0
Nodes training– Berlin, 04-05 october 2013
Promoting data use I: Introduction
Anne-Sophie Archambeau (archambeau@gbif.fr)
...
Summary
In the use of biodiversity data is where the efforts of all the
people working to make the data available digitall...
Outline
1. General review of all use cases
2. Detailed review of nine key cases
3. Sources of information
Outline
1. General review of all use cases
2. Detailed review of nine key cases
3. Sources of information
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
Look at Arthur Chapman’s publication (2005) :
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
(http://imsgbif.gbif.org/CMS_ORC/?
d...
Outline
1. General review of all use cases
2. Detailed review of nine key cases
3. Sources of information
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
Acacia
simsii
http://www.deh.gov.au/biodiversity/abrs/online-resources/abif/flora/main/index.html
Diapo de A. Chapman
Taxo...
Diapo de A. Chapman
Taxonomy
Flora of Australia online
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
Biogeographic studies
Distribution of the
Eurasian Curlew
(Numenius arquata)
in Fife, Scotland
from the
Fife Bird Atlas
(E...
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
Species diversity and populations
Endemisms
0 - 1.25
1.26 - 3.59
3.6 - 6.74
6.75 - 10.4
10.5 - 15.7
15.8 - 22.7
22.8 - 36....
Polynesia -
Micronesia
Polynesia-
Micronesia
California
Floristic
Province
Madrean
Pine-Oak
Woodlands
Mesoamerica
Caribbea...
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
See module 4B for a detailed example on IAS
Invasive species: example of the Asian predatory wasp in France
(Vespa velutina Lepeletier, 1836)
inpn.mnhn.fr
Invasive species: example of the Asian predatory wasp in France
(Vespa velutina Lepeletier, 1836)
inpn.mnhn.fr
Transmitters have been
attached on albatros from
Tasmania to follow them
during 4 months
From the Australian Antarctic Div...
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
See module 4B for a detailed example on impact on climate change
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
Evolution and Genetics
Source: http://www.barcodeoflife.org
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
See module 4B for a detailed example on conservation planning
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
Example of costs due to the loss of biodiversity
The value of the activity of insects pollination was estimated at € 153 b...
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
The Tiger mosquito is known as an
important vector for the transmission
of many viral pathogens, including
the West Nile v...
Slide from Samy Gaiji
Health and Public Safety
Diseases and disease vectors : the Tiger Mosquito
Slide from Samy Gaiji
Health and Public Safety
Diseases and disease vectors : the Tiger Mosquito
Slide from Samy Gaiji
Risk area
Current distribution
Health and Public Safety
Diseases and disease vectors : the Tiger Mos...
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
Ecosystemic services:
The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment:
http://www.unep.org/maweb/en/index.aspx
The Millennium Ecosyste...
Ecosystems and some services they provide:
Ecosystemic services:
GBIF at work - biodiversity data at the service of
science and society
http://www.gbif.org/communica...
Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data
1. Taxonomy
2. Biogeographic studies
3. Species diversity and populations
4. Life ...
Outline
1. General review of all use cases
2. Detailed review of nine key cases
3. Sources of information
GBIF Symposia and workshops:
- GBIF Science Symposium once a year
- The GBIF Secretariat also organises symposia on biodiv...
http://uat.gbif.org/usingdata/summary
http://uat.gbif.org/usingdata/sciencerelevance
http://uat.gbif.org/newsroom/uses
GBIF citation in research
www.mendeley.com
1496 papers collected in october 2013
1496 papers collected in october 2013
Data can be reused by other portals:
GROMS : Global Register of Migratory Species
(www.groms.de)
Nodes training– Berlin, 04-05 october 2013
Promoting data use I: Introduction
Anne-Sophie Archambeau (archambeau@gbif.fr)
...
Module 4A - Promoting data use I: Introduction
Module 4A - Promoting data use I: Introduction
Module 4A - Promoting data use I: Introduction
Module 4A - Promoting data use I: Introduction
Module 4A - Promoting data use I: Introduction
Module 4A - Promoting data use I: Introduction
Module 4A - Promoting data use I: Introduction
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Module 4A - Promoting data use I: Introduction

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In the use of biodiversity data is where the efforts of all the people working to make the data available digitally bears fruit.
In this module we will make a general review of the most frequent scenarios of data use, with two objectives: to help GBIF Node managers to promote them, but also to help them build their own arguments, strategies and plans.

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  • Un effort de modélisation à grande échelle pour identifier les impacts potentiels du changement climatique sur la biodiversité, les risques d'atténuation et d'adaptation
  • 04/10/13 Document de travail / Ne pas diffuser
  • Different combinations of services are provided to human populations from the various types of ecosystems represented here. Their ability to deliver the services depends on complex biological, chemical, and physical interactions, which are in turn affected by human activities.
  • This Figure depicts the strength of linkages between categories of ecosystem services and components of human well-being that are commonly encountered, and includes indications of the extent to which it is possible for socioeconomic factors to mediate the linkage. (For example, if it is possible to purchase a substitute for a degraded ecosystem service, then there is a high potential for mediation.) The strength of the linkages and the potential for mediation differ in different ecosystems and regions. In addition to the influence of ecosystem services on human well-being depicted here, other factors—including other environmental factors as well as economic, social, technological, and cultural factors—influence human well-being, and ecosystems are in turn affected by changes in human well-being. (See Figure B.)
  • Changes in drivers that indirectly affect biodiversity, such as population, technology, and lifestyle (upper right corner of Figure), can lead to changes in drivers directly affecting biodiversity, such as the catch of fish or the application of fertilizers (lower right corner). These result in changes to ecosystems and the services they provide (lower left corner), thereby affecting human well-being. These interactions can take place at more than one scale and can cross scales. For example, an international demand for timber may lead to a regional loss of forest cover, which increases flood magnitude along a local stretch of a river. Similarly, the interactions can take place across different time scales. Different strategies and interventions can be applied at many points in this framewo rk to enhance human well-being and conserve ecosystems.
  • )
  • Transcript of "Module 4A - Promoting data use I: Introduction"

    1. 1. Nodes training– Berlin, 04-05 october 2013 Promoting data use I: Introduction Anne-Sophie Archambeau (archambeau@gbif.fr) Presentation partly based on Arthur Chapman’s publication: « Uses of primary species-occurence data » published by GBIF
    2. 2. Summary In the use of biodiversity data is where the efforts of all the people working to make the data available digitally bears fruit. In this module we will make a general review of the most frequent scenarios of data use, with two objectives: to help Node managers to promote them, but also to help them build their own arguments, strategies and plans. This presentation corresponds to Module 4A of the GB20 Training course for Nodes hold in October 2013 in Berlin, Germany.
    3. 3. Outline 1. General review of all use cases 2. Detailed review of nine key cases 3. Sources of information
    4. 4. Outline 1. General review of all use cases 2. Detailed review of nine key cases 3. Sources of information
    5. 5. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    6. 6. Look at Arthur Chapman’s publication (2005) : Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data (http://imsgbif.gbif.org/CMS_ORC/? doc_id=1300&download=1) Available in English, French, Chinese and Korean
    7. 7. Outline 1. General review of all use cases 2. Detailed review of nine key cases 3. Sources of information
    8. 8. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    9. 9. Acacia simsii http://www.deh.gov.au/biodiversity/abrs/online-resources/abif/flora/main/index.html Diapo de A. Chapman Taxonomy Flora of Australia online
    10. 10. Diapo de A. Chapman Taxonomy Flora of Australia online
    11. 11. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    12. 12. Biogeographic studies Distribution of the Eurasian Curlew (Numenius arquata) in Fife, Scotland from the Fife Bird Atlas (Elkins et al. 2003) using 2 km grid squares. Map reproduced with permission of the authors. Distribution of the Rainbow Bee-eater from The New Atlas of Australian Birds (Barrett et al. 2003). Records are recorded as point records and mapped as a summary in 1- degree grid squares (red) and on 0.25- degree grid squares (grey). Right-hand image - Potential distribution for Tropidechis carinatis in Australia. Red stars indicate known collections, dots show modelled distribution. Left-hand image shows predicted numbers of species in each 1º x 1.5º cell. From Longmore (1986) with permission of Australian Biological Resources Study. Salvin’s Mollymook, Kaikoura, New Diapo de A. Chapman
    13. 13. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    14. 14. Species diversity and populations Endemisms 0 - 1.25 1.26 - 3.59 3.6 - 6.74 6.75 - 10.4 10.5 - 15.7 15.8 - 22.7 22.8 - 36.1 36.2 - 59.5 59.6 - 102 103 - 177 Amphibia - Weighted endemism score Australian Heritage Assessment Tool Department of the Environment & Heritage Australian Government 2004 0 500 1,000250 Kilometers Endemism in Australian frogs showing peak areas for frog endemism highlighted in red. Image from the Australian Heritage Assessment Tool; published with permission of Cameron Slatyer and Dan Rosauer, Australian Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2004.
    15. 15. Polynesia - Micronesia Polynesia- Micronesia California Floristic Province Madrean Pine-Oak Woodlands Mesoamerica Caribbean Islands Tumbes- Chocó- Magdalena Tropical Andes Chilean Winter Rainfall- Valdivian Forests Cerrado Atlantic Forest Cape Floristic Region Succulent Karoo Guinean Forests of West Africa Maputaland- Pondoland-Albany Madagascar and the Indian Ocean Islands enatnomorfAnretsaE Coastal Forests of Eastern Africa Horn of Africa Mediterranean Basin Caucasus Irano- Anatolian Himalaya Mountains of Central Asia Mountains of Southwest China Western Ghats and Sri Lanka Wallacea Sundaland Philippines Japan New Caledonia New Zealand East Melanesian Islands Southwest Australia New Zealand Indo- Burma ©2012 CI Maps Forests of East Australia biodiversity hotspot http://www.conservation.org/where/priority_areas/hotspots/Pages/hotspots_main.aspx To qualify as a hotspot, a region must meet two strict criteria: it must contain at least 1,500 species of vascular plants (> 0.5 percent of the world's total) as endemics, and it has to have lost at least 70 percent of its original habitat. Species diversity and populations Hotspots
    16. 16. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    17. 17. See module 4B for a detailed example on IAS
    18. 18. Invasive species: example of the Asian predatory wasp in France (Vespa velutina Lepeletier, 1836) inpn.mnhn.fr
    19. 19. Invasive species: example of the Asian predatory wasp in France (Vespa velutina Lepeletier, 1836) inpn.mnhn.fr
    20. 20. Transmitters have been attached on albatros from Tasmania to follow them during 4 months From the Australian Antarctic Division Diapo de A. Chapman Tracking Migratory Species
    21. 21. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    22. 22. See module 4B for a detailed example on impact on climate change
    23. 23. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    24. 24. Evolution and Genetics Source: http://www.barcodeoflife.org
    25. 25. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    26. 26. See module 4B for a detailed example on conservation planning
    27. 27. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    28. 28. Example of costs due to the loss of biodiversity The value of the activity of insects pollination was estimated at € 153 billion in 2005 => If the bees disappear, mankind will pollinate the plant itself => New costs (technology development, salaries workers, etc. ....) for a service for now "free” and yet vital (Ecological Economics, 2008).
    29. 29. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    30. 30. The Tiger mosquito is known as an important vector for the transmission of many viral pathogens, including the West Nile virus, Yellow fever virus, St. Louis encephalitis, dengue fever… Slide from Samy Gaiji Health and Public Safety Diseases and disease vectors : the Tiger Mosquito
    31. 31. Slide from Samy Gaiji Health and Public Safety Diseases and disease vectors : the Tiger Mosquito
    32. 32. Slide from Samy Gaiji Health and Public Safety Diseases and disease vectors : the Tiger Mosquito
    33. 33. Slide from Samy Gaiji Risk area Current distribution Health and Public Safety Diseases and disease vectors : the Tiger Mosquito
    34. 34. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    35. 35. Ecosystemic services: The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment: http://www.unep.org/maweb/en/index.aspx The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment assessed the consequences of ecosystem change for human well-being. From 2001 to 2005, the MA involved the work of more than 1,360 experts worldwide. Their findings provide a state-of-the-art scientific appraisal of the condition and trends in the world’s ecosystems and the services they provide, as well as the scientific basis for action to conserve and use them sustainably.
    36. 36. Ecosystems and some services they provide:
    37. 37. Ecosystemic services: GBIF at work - biodiversity data at the service of science and society http://www.gbif.org/communications/news-and-events/gbif- symposia-and-workshops/2012-science-symposium/
    38. 38. Uses of Primary Species-Occurrence Data 1. Taxonomy 2. Biogeographic studies 3. Species diversity and populations 4. Life histories and phenologies 5. Endangered, Migratory and Invasive Species 6. Impact of Climate Change 7. Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 8. Environmental Regionalisation 9. Conservation Planning 10. Natural Resource Management 11. Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and Mining 12. Health and Public Safety 13. Bioprospecting 14. Forensics 15. Border Control and Wildlife Trade 16. Education and Public Outreach 17. Ecotourism and Recreational Activities 18. Society and Politics 19. Human Infrastructure Planning
    39. 39. Outline 1. General review of all use cases 2. Detailed review of nine key cases 3. Sources of information
    40. 40. GBIF Symposia and workshops: - GBIF Science Symposium once a year - The GBIF Secretariat also organises symposia on biodiversity informatics at other meetings. => abstracts, PowerPoint presentations and other materials related to these events are available here: http://www.gbif.org/communications/news-and-events/gbif- symposia-and-workshops/#c1910
    41. 41. http://uat.gbif.org/usingdata/summary
    42. 42. http://uat.gbif.org/usingdata/sciencerelevance
    43. 43. http://uat.gbif.org/newsroom/uses
    44. 44. GBIF citation in research
    45. 45. www.mendeley.com 1496 papers collected in october 2013
    46. 46. 1496 papers collected in october 2013
    47. 47. Data can be reused by other portals: GROMS : Global Register of Migratory Species (www.groms.de)
    48. 48. Nodes training– Berlin, 04-05 october 2013 Promoting data use I: Introduction Anne-Sophie Archambeau (archambeau@gbif.fr) Presentation partly based on Arthur Chapman’s publication: « Uses of primary species-occurence data » published by GBIF
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