Module 1 - Mise en place des points nodaux GBIF I : Créez un dossier solide pour votre point nodal
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Module 1 - Mise en place des points nodaux GBIF I : Créez un dossier solide pour votre point nodal

  • 320 views
Uploaded on

Les dossiers de décision sont des outils très fréquemment utilisés pour présenter des propositions, défendre des positions, convaincre un public, etc. ...

Les dossiers de décision sont des outils très fréquemment utilisés pour présenter des propositions, défendre des positions, convaincre un public, etc.
Les points nodaux du GBIF peuvent tirer bénéfice de l’utilisation de ce cadre de travail, étant donné qu’il requiert un processus systématique de planification et d’esprit critique qui ne peut que porter ses fruits par la suite.
Dans ce module, nous utiliserons les dossiers de décision comme outils génériques. D’autres modules vous donneront un aperçu de la façon dont vos dossiers de décision peuvent être complétés avec un contenu approprié.
Cette présentation correspond au Module 1 de la session d’exercices pour points nodaux du GB20, organisé à Berlin (Allemagne) en octobre 2013.

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
320
On Slideshare
311
From Embeds
9
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 9

http://community.gbif.org 9

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Template image by Zsuzsanna Kilian, Hugary (http://www.sxc.hu/profile/nkzs), obtained through stock.xchng (http://www.sxc.hu/). Cette présentation a été traduit en Français par Sophie Pamerlon, du point nodal de GBIF France.
  • Note Sophie : « Business case » n’est pas facile à traduire en français, j’ai choisi « dossier de décision », ne pas hésiter à modifier cette traduction. J’ai dû réduire l’interligne afin que le texte ne dépasse pas de la page, j’espère que ça reste lisible !
  • Another way of looking at it: “A business case justifies the investment required to deliver a proposed solution”. Image composed based in an image by Pieter Beens (The Netherlands), obtained through stock.xchng (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1314696).
  • Another way of looking at it: “A business case justifies the investment required to deliver a proposed solution”. Image composed based in an image by Pieter Beens (The Netherlands), obtained through stock.xchng (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1314696).
  • Why is it useful to build a business case around your Node? Establish the Node position and scope Secure funds Ensure sustainability Be ready for unexpected challenges Increase the success rate of your proposals Influence your professional career: a successful business case shows your skills as a planner and leader in the field. A poorly presented project may undermine your options in the future. Image by Vangelis Thomaidis (Greece), obtained through stock.schng (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1004849).
  • On these points: Written for the decision maker: that means that the level of information, the language used, the depth of the information… has to be adapted to the audience. Easy to follow and understand: If the explanations are too complex, not presented together with adequate schemas, and graphs, chances are that you will lose the interest of your audience. Well structured: the information needs to be easy to find. Clear and concise: brevity is always a virtue. The goal is to be persuasive, not wordy. Rigorous: your case need to be based on facts, that are verifiable. Never build a case based on unrealistic assumptions, unverified information, etc. Relevant: the case need to be focussed on addressing a specific situation. The contents need to be targeted, with no superfluous information. Solid: A good business case should be able to withstand challenges. Image from ilco (Turkey), obtained through stock.xchng (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1078183).
  • On these points: Who will be taking the decisions? One person? A group of people? What is the decision workflow? Consider the roles of the people involved. Who can influence their decisions? If there is any advisory body that will pre-select proposals or influence the decision, try to get insights about them too. Institutional policies / mission: try to align your proposal with the ultimate mission of the organization who will take the decision, your audience, etc. Individual interests: different people take decisions differently, according to their beliefs, values, education, experience, background, priorities and values. Adjust your language & jargon level: keep it simple and accurate. Keep jargon to a minimum, unless strictly necessary. Include the adequate level of detail: don’t assume things that they may know. Don’t explain things that they know. Try to get their opinion early: if there is contact information available; any mechanism to evaluate early drafts, pre-proposals,… use them! Image by Michal Zacharzewski (Poland), obtained through stock.xchng (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1174494).
  • The format of the business case varies case by case, but all include a structure similar to this one. Use the format already adopted by the organization, if there’s one. The size of the business case should not be the main criteria. It needs to include all the information needed. Include extensive information as annexes, not in the main body of the text. Brevity is always a virtue.
  • On these points: High level view Condensed view, with all components. No longer than 1-2 pages. Plain language It is the key to the rest of the document: some stakeholders will only read this part. Last part to be written
  • The case will have to focus on providing solution to the main problem/opportunity, or to a subset of them, depending on the interests of the stakeholders. We will see many examples in the module dealing with uses of data. Important to be objective, neutral. Don’t complain about the situation. Don’t blame or accuse anyone.
  • SWOT: Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. There is a lot of information about these kind of analysis on the web.
  • On these points: Description of SEVERAL ways to deal with the situation (3-4 is a good number). If possible, include different scales (a bigger proposal that delivers good value may attract the interest of the stakeholders). Don’t introduce weak solutions: they are easy to spot. Create strong alternatives or the stakeholders may introduce them for you. Sufficient detail to be understood. Graphs help a lot. You do not need to present 4 developed proposals. Sufficent data so the different options can be compared: pros & cons of the different options should be equivalent so they can be compared (also with the current status presented before). One of them must be identified as the preferred solution. Leaving the options open does not help the decision maker. Why is the preferred solution needs to be explained, puting yourself in the skin of the decision maker: use the same criteria that they would use (costs and benefits, strategic value, etc). It shows that you know the issue well. Be prepared if they want to explore one of the alternative options presented.
  • On these points: It should provide enough detail on how the preferred solution could be implemented: it shows that you have given real thought to the details of the implementation. Again, it depends on the audience! Resources and timing are essential elements that need to be clearly explained. Avoid any ‘we will decide that later’ statements. No need for an exhaustive plan, that will come with the execution. Remember that it can happen that it is not the preferred solution. Make the links with the problem and analysis section.
  • On these points: Depending on the audience, this section will be more or less detailed. You don’t need to include all details in the proposal, but you need to know them. Seek help if needed. Important to highlight quantitative AND qualitative benefits and costs. Quantitative: Expenses vs direct savings and possible revenue generated, return of investment, probabilities of success, release of capacity of current workers, etc. Qualitative: Positioning and leadership, etc. Any benefit that is difficult to quantify should be listed here. Consider direct and indirect costs. i.e. administrative charges, Try to use ‘their’ data. This is a generic piece of advice: if their Ministry, department etc produces information about costs, use their assumptions. You will face less oposition.
  • Works better for longer documents.
  • On these points:
  • Some of these generic documents can give you the background information to describe the current situation and the options offered by GBIF participation. As for examples of how other Nodes has structured their cases, we hope to discuss that in Module 2A.
  • Image composed based in an image by Pieter Beens (The Netherlands), obtained through stock.xchng (http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1314696).

Transcript

  • 1. GB20 : sessions d’exercices pour les points nodaux Mise en place des points nodaux GBIF I : Créez un dossier solide pour votre point nodal Alberto González-Talaván Senior Programme Officer for Training GBIF Secretariat 4 Octobre 2013
  • 2. Résumé Les dossiers de décision sont des outils très fréquemment utilisés pour présenter des propositions, défendre des positions, convaincre un public, etc. Les points nodaux du GBIF peuvent tirer bénéfice de l’utilisation de ce cadre de travail, étant donné qu’il requiert un processus systématique de planification et d’esprit critique qui ne peut que porter ses fruits par la suite. Dans ce module, nous utiliserons les dossiers de décision comme outils génériques. D’autres modules vous donneront un aperçu de la façon dont vos dossiers de décision peuvent être complétés avec un contenu approprié. Cette présentation correspond au Module 1 de la session d’exercices pour points nodaux du GB20, organisé à Berlin (Allemagne) en octobre 2013.
  • 3. Plan 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 4. Outline 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 5. Stratégie d’approche : définition Un dossier de décision est : “Un outil de communication, rédigé dans un langage que le public ciblé comprend et assez détaillé pour faciliter la prise de décision de sa part.” From Ilya Bogorad, 6 Essential Elements for a Winning Business Case, Tech Decision Maker, July 19, 2011
  • 6. Stratégie d’approche : définition Un dossier de décision est : “Un outil de communication, rédigé dans un langage que le public ciblé comprend et assez détaillé pour faciliter la prise de décision de sa part.” From Ilya Bogorad, 6 Essential Elements for a Winning Business Case, Tech Decision Maker, July 19, 2011
  • 7. Stratégie d’approche : sous quelle forme ? Un projet général, envoyé à un Ministère, dans le but de rejoindre une organisation telle que le GBIF Un plan d’action d’une structure nationale pour la création (ou gestion) d’un système d’information sur la biodiversité et d’un point nodal Un plan annuel Une proposition de projet afin qu’une structure finance la numérisation des données Une proposition d’accord de collaboration entre organisations Une intervention dans un symposium international afin d’encourager la publication de données et leur libre accès
  • 8. Stratégie d’approche : dans quel but ? Etablir la position du point nodal et son rayon d’action Sécuriser le financement Assurer la durabilité des projets Être mieux préparé pour les défis et opportunités inattendus Augmenter le taux de succès de vos projets Influencer votre carrière professionnelle
  • 9. Outline 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 10. Outline 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 11. Caractéristiques • Rédigé pour les preneurs de décisions • Facile à suivre et à comprendre • Bien structuré • Clair et concis • Rigoureux • Pertinent • Solide
  • 12. Plan 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 13. Outline 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 14. Connaissez votre public ! Quelles personnes prendront les décisions ? Qui peut influencer leurs décisions ? Politiques et missions institutionnelles Intérêts individuels Ajustez votre langage et votre niveau de jargon Incluez un niveau de détail adéquat Explorez d’autres projets approuvés antérieurement Essayez de connaître leurs opinions assez tôt ?
  • 15. Outline 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 16. Outline 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 17. Composants 1. Résumé 2. Contexte 3. Problématique 4. Analyse de la situation et des conséquences 5. Solutions proposées et alternatives recommandées 6. Plan d’implémentation 7. Estimation coût/bénéfice 8. Conclusions et pistes de réflexion 44 55 66 77332211 88
  • 18. Composants : résumé Vision d’ensemble Présentation condensée, avec tous les composants Langage simple C’est la clé pour comprendre le reste du document Dernière partie à écrire 4 5 6 73211 8
  • 19. Composants : contexte Le strict nécessaire d’informations basiques que les preneurs de décisions ont besoin de connaître pour comprendre les propositions et la situation actuelle Plus important lors de la présentation de dossiers à un public externe Assurez-vous que vos sources sont fiables Par exemple, une description des méthodes utilisées actuellement pour gérer les ressources et informations sur la biodiversité, en incluant les acteurs au niveau national. 4 5 6 732211 8
  • 20. Composants : problématique La raison pour laquelle vous créez le dossier. Cela peut être : • Un problème, une situation qui doit être résolue • Une opportunité de générer des bénéfices, des revenus, réduire les coûts, augmenter l’efficacité, etc. • Une exigence formelle, un changement obligatoire. Il est important de garder un ton objectif, neutre. Par exemple, inefficacité à gérer des données, manque d’un accès (coordonné) aux données, incapacité à gérer les ressources naturelles de façon optimale, engagements internationaux non remplis, investissements répétés pour collecter des données identiques. 4 5 6 7332211 8
  • 21. Composants : analyse Information supplémentaire sur les circonstances de mise en place de la situation actuelle Fournit des projections sur l’évolution de la situation dans le cas où rien n’est fait Un préambule à la section suivante Vous pouvez utiliser des outils d’analyse génériques tels que SWOT Par exemple, les coûts financiers du maintien de la situation existante. Problèmes d’extensibilité. Image internationale. 44 5 6 7332211 8
  • 22. Composants : les solutions Description de PLUSIEURS façons de gérer la situation (3-4 est un bon nombre) Assez de détail pour être compris Assez de données pour que les différentes options puissent être comparées Une d’entre elles doit être identifiée comme étant la solution de préférence. Anticipez les objections Par exemple, organiser un système national d’information indépendant, copier le système utilisé dans un autre pays, recentrer un système existant, etc. 44 55 6 7332211 8
  • 23. Composants : plan d’implémentation Il doit fournir assez de détails sur la façon dont la solution retenue peut être implémentée Un plan exhaustif n’est pas nécessaire Faire le lien avec la problématique et la section d’analyse Inclure une section d’évaluation des risques Par exemple, vous pouvez inclure des détails sur le rayon d’action, la gouvernance, les équipes de travail, les rôles et responsabilités, les ressources externes, les plans de communication, les plannings, la gestion des risques. 44 55 66 7332211 8
  • 24. Composants : estimation coût/bénéfice Le niveau de détail peut varier, mais soyez toujours RÉALISTES. Soulignez les coûts et bénéfices quantitatifs ET qualitatifs. Prenez en compte les coûts directs et indirects. Essayez d’utiliser leurs données. Par exemple : Quantitatif : économies réalisées grâce à une efficacité améliorée et à des investissements déjà effectués par d’autres. Qualitatif : positionnement national et international, transparence, mise en place de bonnes pratiques, accès amélioré aux informations, augmentation de la capacité, etc. 44 55 66 77332211 8
  • 25. Composants : les conclusions Un résumé dynamique qui reprend les points mentionnés dans les paragraphes précédents. Inclut les principaux points et figures Fonctionne comme un appel à l’action Par exemple, investir X € génèrera Y € d’économies et produira les bénéfices immédiats A, B et C. 44 55 66 77332211 88
  • 26. Plan 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 27. Plan 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 28. Recommandations 1. TOUJOURS s’adapter à la situation et au public 2. Donner des alternatives réelles comme solutions 3. Trouver d’où l’opposition est susceptible de venir 4. Rendez votre public maître des données 5. “Prenez la température” le plus tôt possible 6. Soyez concis, clair, logique et convaincant 7. Soyez prêts à défendre votre proposition en 30 secondes, 5 minutes et 30 minutes.
  • 29. Plan 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 30. Plan 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 31. Ressources : spécifiques aux points nodaux Global Biodiversity Informatics Outlook http://www.gbif.org/orc/?doc_id=5353 Plan stratégique du GBIF http://www.gbif.org/orc/?doc_id=2792 Bénéfices de la participation au GBIF http://www.gbif.org/participation/outreach Comment créer stratégies et plans pour les points nodaux → Module 2A. Comment positionner stratégiquement votre point nodal → Module 2B. Utilisations des données → Modules 4A, 4B.
  • 32. Ressources : sur les dossiers de décisions Jonathan Wu, 2001, Creating a successful business case to advance your initiative. http://www.information-management.com/news/4330-1.html Ilya Bogorad, 2011, 6 essential elements for a winning business case. http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/tech-decision-maker/6-essential-elements-for- a-winning-business-case/. Margaret Rouse, 2012, How to write a business case document. http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/How-to-write-a-business-case-document. Bizvortex Consulting Group Inc., Business case template. http://new.bizvortex.com/products/. Ilya Bogorad, 2010, Thirty tips for a better proposal or business case. http://bizvortex.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/. Bizvortex Consulting Group Inc., 2010, Business case tips. http://new.bizvortex.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/Business-Case-Tips.pdf Steven Gara, 2013, How to build a project’s business case. http://news.dice.com/2013/04/12/how-to-define-a-business-case/. Plus d’informations sur http://community.gbif.org/pg/pages/view/36138/
  • 33. Plan 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 34. Plan 1. Stratégie d’approche 2. Caractéristiques d’un dossier réussi 3. Connaissez votre public ! 4. Composants d’un dossier de décision 5. Recommandations 6. Ressources 7. Conclusions
  • 35. Conclusions Les dossiers de décision sont de bons outils lors de la présentation de propositions liées à votre point nodal Ils vous aident à mener à bien un processus d’analyse et de planification qui se révèlera payant Ils vous aident à saisir des opportunités et à vous adapter aux changements Ils peuvent être appliqués à des niveaux très différents Adaptez-les au public et à la situation
  • 36. GB20 : sessions d’exercices pour les points nodaux Mise en place des points nodaux GBIF I : Créez un dossier solide pour votre point nodal Alberto González-Talaván Senior Programme Officer for Training GBIF Secretariat 4 Octobre 2013