Rev. 1
                                                                             10.11.2009
                           ...
4. TEACHING METHOD
Lectures - Slides - Field Trips - Demonstrations with student practice - Group or class discussions -
O...
6. COURSE SITE VISITS AND FIELDTRIPS

Visits to Azienda Agricola Fattoria di Maiano
No extra cost.

7. COURSE MATERIALS
N/...
11. ASSIGNMENTS, TERM PAPERS AND EXAMS
Note: the date and time of the exams cannot be changed for any reason



12. LESSON...
In Defense of Food: pages 40-50, 58-78.

Italian Food: Almond pages 11-13, Butter 81-82, Hazelnut 245-246, Lard 270-271, L...
Week 5 Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Fruits in Mediterranean diet.
Common fruits in Mediterranean diet: figs, grapes, dates, cit...
124-126, Chives 126, Ciannamon 129-131, Cloves 133-134, Coriander 142-143, Cucumber 150,
Cumin 151, Dandelion 154, Dill 15...
Monkfish 331-332, Moray eel 332-333, Mozzarella di bufala 336-337, Mussel 340, Octopus 346,
Ombrine 350, Oyster 353-354, P...
Week 13 Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Mediterranean menu for special population. Hypertension, hearth and circulation.
  1. Exc...
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Alberto Fatticcioni Fw+Dn+Ds+520+Dietetics+And+Nutrition Edited

  1. 1. Rev. 1 10.11.2009 SYLLABUS RMD PALAZZI - FLORENCE ASSOCIATION FOR INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION FLORENCE UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS APICIUS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY SCHOOL OF FOOD AND WINE STUDIES DEPARTMENT OF DIETETICS AND NUTRITION COURSE TITLE: DIETETICS AND NUTRITION IN THE MEDITERRANEAN COURSE CODE: FW DN DS 520 SECTION: 201 SPRING 2010 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) Class Meetings: Tuesday 12:00-3:00 pm Classroom: Instructor: Alberto Fatticcioni Instructor Availability: Tuesday 11:00-12:00 Contact: info@albertofatticcioni.com – 320 88 17 653 1. COURSE DESCRIPTION This course introduces students to the benefits of eating the “Mediterranean way”, focusing on the nutritional aspects of the diet, the culinary tradition of the most significant Mediterranean countries and on the cultural relevance of the Mediterranean way of eating. Scientists and researchers have discovered that traditional Mediterranean cuisine is one of the most healthful, nutritious diets in the world, one that can help you live longer and enjoy far lower rates of coronary heart disease and other chronic conditions, including diabetes and cancer. Instructor’s Note: Olive oil, whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits, seafood and other Mediterranean food will be closely examined and different healthy food combinations analyzed and discussed. Mediterranean menu composition and meal planning for special population (diabetic, heart disease, overweight, obese, celiac disease, vegetarian) will be discussed 2. OBJECTIVE The course objective is to provide the student with fundamental knowledge of food composition and transformation in the cooking processes and to show students the cultural, social and medical relevance of food choices and unbalanced diet. Through the understanding of food composition, and dietetics aspect (calories, nutrients, micronutrients) students will be able to plan a nutritionally balanced diet, a healthy Mediterranean menu and to critically evaluate the too often confusing and contradictory dietary advice of Western society. Students develop particular skills in understanding foods and food cures and will be able to construct special menus for vegetarians, diabetics, obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, high cholesterol, celiac disease, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s, cancer. 3. REQUIREMENTS The course is open to graduates of Culinary Arts or students with at least 3 years of restaurant or food service experience at the professional level
  2. 2. 4. TEACHING METHOD Lectures - Slides - Field Trips - Demonstrations with student practice - Group or class discussions - Oral presentations. 5. TEXT BOOK AND ACADEMIC RESOURCES COURSE TEXT BOOK • THE NEW MEDITERRANEAN DIET COOKBOOK, by Nancy Harmon Jenkis, 2009, Bantam Book • FOOD CURES, By Allison Cleary, Norine Dworkin-McDaniel, Debra Gordon, Dorothy Foltz- Gray, Timothy Grower, 2009 The Reader’s Digest Association inc FURTHER SUGGESTED READINGS: • WHAT TO EAT, by Marion Nestle, 2006, North Point Press • IN DEFENSE OF FOOD An Eater’s Manifesto, 2008, Penguin books • DIET AND HEALTH: Implication for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk, online book, http://books.- nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=1222#toc • ITALIAN FOOD, Gillian Riley, 2007, Oxford University Press INTERNET RESOURCES: Nutrition Data, foods database for nutrients LIBRARIES IN FLORENCE Students have access to the two school libraries at Apicius International School of Hospitality and Florence University of the Arts: Apicius: The Apicius library is located on the 1st floor of the annex at GANZO in via dei Macci 85r. Florence University of the Arts: The FUA library is located on the first floor of Via Magliabechi 1. Please consult the posted course schedules for official opening times. Please note that both libraries are consultation only and thus it is not possible to remove texts. However It is possible to make photocopies (fee-based). Students are encouraged to take advantage of Florence’s libraries and research centers: Biblioteca Palagio di Parte Guelfa Located in Piazzetta di Parte Guelfa between Piazza della Repubblica and Ponte Vecchio. Telephone: 055.261.6029. The library is open Monday thru Saturday. This library is open until 10:00pm during weekdays. Biblioteca delle Oblate Located in via dell'Oriuolo 26 (across the street from SQUOLA Center for Contemporary Italian Studies) Telephone: 055 261 6512. Please consult the website www.bibliotecadelleoblate.it for current opening times under “orario”. The Harold Acton Library at the British Institute of Florence Address: Lungarno Guicciardini 9. For opening times and student membership information: www.britishinstitute.it/en. This is a fee-based membership library. 2
  3. 3. 6. COURSE SITE VISITS AND FIELDTRIPS Visits to Azienda Agricola Fattoria di Maiano No extra cost. 7. COURSE MATERIALS N/A 8. ADDITIONAL FEES N/A 9. EVALUATION AND GRADING SYSTEM Final Grade Breakdown Please note that a detailed explanation of the above is found in Section 11 (Assignments, Term Papers and Exams). Grading Scale A = 100 – 93% A - = 92 – 90% B+ = 89 – 87% B = 86 – 83% B- = 82 – 80% C+ = 79 – 77% C = 76 – 73% C- = 72 – 70% D = 69 – 60% F = 59 – 0% 10. ATTENDANCE AND PARTICIPATION Institutional Attendance Policy: Academic integrity and mutual respect between instructor and student are central to a positive and productive learning experience. This belief is reflected in the attendance policy. Attendance will be taken at the start of every class. Attendance is mandatory for all class meetings. Absence from class will negatively impact the final grade. One to Two Absences: Will result in lowering of the Participation and Final Grade as per the grading system. Three Absences: Will result in the final grade being lowered one full letter grade. (Example 90% / A – will become 80% / B -) Four Absences: Will result in an “automatic failure”. It is the student's responsibility to know how many absences they have in a course. If you are in doubt, talk to your instructor! Late Arrival and Early Departure Arriving late or departing early from class is not acceptable. Two late arrivals or early departures or a combination will result in an unexcused absence. Travel is not an acceptable excuse for being late. Personal Day Students may request a “Personal Day” to be excused from class for a medical or personal emergency one time during the semester. (Fall and Spring Terms only) The request must be made within 24 hours of the absence during regular school hours. Students must follow the instructions and regulations set forth in the academic handbook. All requests must be made in person. For further information or to request a “Personal Day”: APICIUS Students: Front Desk in Via Guelfa 85 FUA Students: Front Desk in Corso Tintori 21 Travel (or delays due to travel) is NEVER an excuse for absence from class. 3
  4. 4. 11. ASSIGNMENTS, TERM PAPERS AND EXAMS Note: the date and time of the exams cannot be changed for any reason 12. LESSON PLAN Week 1 Tuesday, February 2, 2010 Introduction, “Mediterranean Diet” and “Mediterranean Food”; • Mediterranean Diet Pyramid Focus on Mediterranean diet and health • Adherence to Mediterranean Diet and Health status: meta-analysis Diet, nutrition and nutritionism; the industrialization of eating Basic Nutrition Concepts ; • Calories, Macronutrients (carbohydrates, protein, fats) • Micronutrients (fat-soluble vitamins, water-soluble vitamins, minerals) Reading : The New Mediterranean Diet Cookbook: pages 1-23, 467-473 What To Eat: pages 3-16, 282-295. In Defense of Food: pages 19-36, 101-136. Italian Food: Cucina povera pages 149-150, Greek gastronomy 239, Mediterranean diet 319-320, Week 2 Tuesday, February 9, 2010 Sources of fats in Mediterranean Diet: Olive Oil and nuts. Olive oil and health. History of olive oil; olive oil production; olive oil classification. Common nuts in the Mediterranean Diet: almonds, walnut, pistachios, pine nuts. Other nuts: hazelnuts, peanuts Fats and oils; saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated; • Fats and other lipids Cholesterol. Lipids and diet; Lipids and cooking. Focus on foods and lipids sources: Lipids from animal source and lipids from vegetable source. Reading: Food Cures: pages 14-31, page 58, page 61, page 63. What To Eat: pages 108-126, pages 385-400. 4
  5. 5. In Defense of Food: pages 40-50, 58-78. Italian Food: Almond pages 11-13, Butter 81-82, Hazelnut 245-246, Lard 270-271, Lardo 271-272, Nut 344-345, Olive 347-348, Olive oil 348-350, Peanut 383, Pine Nuts 404-405, Pistachio 409-410, Pizza 410-411, Sunflower 521, Walnut 574-577. Week 3 Tuesday, February 16, 2010 Grains and processed foods grains in Mediterranean diet. Foods and carbohydrate sources: Whole grain, Pasta, White Bread, Whole Grain Bread, Pizza Focus on carbohydrates; Monosaccharides, disaccharides and polysaccharides; • Carbohydrates Carbohydrates and diet: glycemic load and glycemic index • Glycemic index database Reading: Food Cures: pages 31-37, page 62, page 70 What To Eat : pages 305-316, pages 335-349, pages 481-496. Italian Food: Barley pages 39-40, Bread 65-69, Breads rustic 73-74, Bruschetta 79, Buckwheat 80, Chestnut 118-120, Emmer wheat 180-181, Flatbreads 211-213, Flour 214, Focaccia 215-216, Gnocchi 232-233, Grissini 240, Honey 250-253, Maize 304, Millet 319-320, Oats 346, Pane di ramerino 358, Panzanella 360, Pappa al pomodoro 360-361, Pasta 366-380, Polenta 414-415, Potato 419, Rice 441-442, Risotto 444-445, Rye 461-462, Spelt 507, Sugar 518-521, Wheat 579. Week 4 Tuesday, February 23, 2010 Common legumes in Mediterranean diet; chickpeas, lentils, peas, beans, grass pea, broadbeans. Other legumes: soy beans, lupins Legumes, the most important dietary predictor of survival in older people of different ethnicities Mushrooms in Mediterranean Diet. Focus on protein; amino acids and structures, animal and plant proteins. • Protein Vegetarianism and protein intake Reading Food Cures: page 33, page 66, Italian Food: Beans pages 46-48, Broad beans pages 75-76, Chickpeas 121-124, Lentil 279, Lupin 302, Mushrooms 338-339, Pea 381-382, Ribollita 439-441, Truffle 533-534, Zuppa 590-591 5
  6. 6. Week 5 Tuesday, March 2, 2010 Fruits in Mediterranean diet. Common fruits in Mediterranean diet: figs, grapes, dates, citrus fruits, pomegranates. Focus on vitamins. Vitamins and Mediterranean Diet. Focus on foods and vitamins sources • Fat-soluble vitamins • Water-soluble vitamins Wine and health. Balsamic vinegar, vinegar Focus on antioxidants and phythonutrients Fruit and vegetables: the price of fresh. Organic Food. Food miles. Reading: Food Cures: pages 38-44, page 54. What To Eat: pages 25- 45. Italian Food: Apple pages 18-20, Apricot 20-21, Azarole 32, Balsamic Vinegar 35-37, Bergamot orange 50, Blueberry 53-54, Blackberry 57, Cherries cornelian 117, Cherry 118, Citron 131-132, Citrus fruits 132-133, Currant and raisin 152-153, Fig 200-201, Gooseberry 234-235, Grape 237-238, Medlar 320, Melon 320-321, Mostarda di frutta 335, Mosto cotto 336, Mulberry 337, Orange 351-352, Peach 382, Pear 383-384, Persimmon 388, Plum 413-414, Pomegranate 416-417, Quince 429-431, Raspberry 437, Sorb Apples 505, Strawberry 516, Vinegar 572-573, Watermelon 578, Wine 582-585. Week 6 Tuesday, March 9, 2010 Vegetables, aromatic herbs & spices. Plant natural product and Health Focus on fiber; fiber-rich foods. • Dietary fiber Focus on mineral; macro and micro-mineral; Focus on mineral-rich foods. • Minerals • Trace-elements Reading Food Cures: pages 55-56, page 59, 64, 67-68, 72-75 In Defense of Food: pages 161-181 Italian Food: Agretti page 8, Anise 16, Artichoke 24-27, Asparagus 30-32, Bagna cauda 35, Basil 40-41, Bay Leaves 45-46, Borage 61-63, Broccoli 76-77, Cabbage 84, Capers 99-100, Cardamom 101-102, Cardoon 102-103, Carrot 104, Cauliflower 107-108, Celery 111-112, Chilli pepper 6
  7. 7. 124-126, Chives 126, Ciannamon 129-131, Cloves 133-134, Coriander 142-143, Cucumber 150, Cumin 151, Dandelion 154, Dill 159, Dittany 159-160, Eggplant 169-170, Elderflower and berries 170-171, Endive 181-182, Fennel 189-192, Garlic 226-227, Ginger 231, Grains of paradise 235, Herbs 247-250, Horseradish 254, Juniper 265-266, Lamb’s lettuce 269, Lamb’s quarters 269, Lampascione 269, Lemon Balm 278-279, Lemon Verbena 279, Lettuce 279-280, Lovage 301, Mace 303, Marjoram 309-310, Marrow 310, Mint 329-330, Mustard 340, Myrtle 340-341, Nutmeg 344-345, Onion 350-351, Oregano 352-353, Parsley 365-366, Parsnip 366, Pennyroyal 387, Pepper 387-388, Poppy 418-419, Pumpkin 427, Radicchio 433, Radish 433, Rhubarb 439, Rocket 446, Rosemary 456, Saffron 462-466, Sage 466-467, Salad 467-469, Salsa verde 476-477, Salsify 477-478, Sesamo 494, Sformato 495, Shallot 495, Sorrel 505, Spices 507-508, Spinach 509-511, Sweet or bell pepper 522, Tyme 528, Tomato 529-530, Turnip 536, Wild greens 581-582, Zucchini 589-590. Week 7 Tuesday, March 16, 2010 Exam Week 8 Tuesday, March 23, 2010 No class – Midterm Break Week 9 Tuesday, March 30, 2010 Fish and Mediterranean seafood What’s so healthy about seafood? Focus on poly-unsaturated fats; omega-3 rich foods. Diary products in Mediterranean Diet. Milk and yogurt. Focus on foods and animal protein sources: Read meat, white meat and with dish. Meat in Mediterranean diet. Reading Food Cures: page 60, 65, 71. What To Eat : pages 67-107, 181-202. Italian Food: Anchovy pages 14-15, Baccalà page 33, Beef p48-50, Biancomangiare 52-53 ; Bonito 61, Botargo 63-64, Bresaola 74-75, Brodetto 77-78, Broth 78-79, Buridda 80-81, Cacciucco 84-85, Cheese 114-117, Chicken 116-117, Clam 133, Crab 146-147, Cuttlefish 153, Deer 154-156, Dentex 158, Duck 163-164, Eel 166-167, Eeg 167-168, Fegatini 186-187, Fish and seafood 202-206, Fish freshwater 206-207, Fish preserved 207-210, Fish soup 210-211, Flounder 213, Frittata 220, Frog 224, Gambero 225, Game 225-226, Gilt-Head Bream 230, Goat and kid 233, Goby 234, Goose 234, Grana Padano 235-237, Grey mullet 240, Grouper 240-241, Guinea fowl 242-243, Gurnard 243, Hake 245, Ham 245-246, Hare 245, Herring 250, Horse 253, Junket 266, Lamprey 269-270, Liver 293-294, Lobster 294-295, Mackerel 303, Marzolino 313, Milk 328, 7
  8. 8. Monkfish 331-332, Moray eel 332-333, Mozzarella di bufala 336-337, Mussel 340, Octopus 346, Ombrine 350, Oyster 353-354, Pancetta 356, Parmesan 361-365, Peacock 382-383, Pecorino 384-386, Pheasant 390, Pig 396-402, Pigeon 402-403, Pike 403, Provola 422, Provolone 422, Quail 429, Rabbit 432, Ray 437, Red mullet 437-438, Ricotta 442-444, Salame 470-473, Sar 483, Sardine 483-484, Scallop 490, Scampi 490, Scorpion fish 493, Seabass 493, Sea urchin 494, Shad 495, Sheep 495, Shellfish and Crustaceans 497, Shrimp 497, Snail 503, Sole 504, Squid 511, Swordfish 522-523, Tripe 532, Trout 532-533, Tuna 534, Turbot 534, Turkey 535-536, Wild boar 580-581. Week 10 Tuesday, April 6, 2010 No class Week 11 Tuesday, April 13, 2010 The Traditional Healthy Mediterranean Diet: the principles and basics of Mediterranean diet menu. Healthy Mediterranean menu; breakfast, snack, lunch and dinner ideas. Mediterranean menu for vegetarians • Vegetarianism Mediterranean menu for Alzheimer disease. Mediterranean menu for cancer • Cancer Mediterranean menu for osteoporosis • Osteoporosis Reading: Food Cures: pages 92-95, pages 120-125, pages 254-257. Italian food : Granita 237, Ice cream 255-260, Jam 263, Jelly 263, Liquorice 292, Marzipan 312-313, Vanilla 556-557, Vegetarianism 560-561. Week 12 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 Mediterranean menu for special population. Obesity and diabetes. The health cooker. 1. Dietary management of obesity Mediterranean menu for overweight and obese people. 1. Diabetic diet Mediterranean menu for diabetes Mediterranean menu for constipation Reading: Food Cures: pages 136-137, 142-147, 248-253. 8
  9. 9. Week 13 Tuesday, April 27, 2010 Mediterranean menu for special population. Hypertension, hearth and circulation. 1. Excess dietary sodium is an important contributor to high blood pressure 2. Hypertension Mediterranean menu for high blood pressure Mediterranean menu for heart disease/high cholesterol. Mediterranean menu for stroke • Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular disease Mediterranean menu for coeliac disease; gluten-free Mediterranean diet. • Celiac disease Reading: Food Cures: pages 174-181, 186-189, 270-275 Week 14 Tuesday, May 4, 2010, 9:00 am – 2:30 pm Field trip: walking into Mediterranean agriculture. Trekking into the organic farm “Azienda Agricola Fattoria di Maiano”, Via Benedetto da Maiano, 11 - 50014 Fiesole – FI. The “Laudemio” Organic Extravirgin OliveOil Mediterranean Diet, physical activity and physical exercise Week 15 Tuesday, May 11, 2010 Final exam ALTERNATIVE LESSON: In the case of the instructor’s absence, a substitute will carry out a pre- prepared alternative lesson during the regular course time. 9

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