Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Sheri Heller
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Sheri Heller

285

Published on

Sheri Heller, Lakeland College …

Sheri Heller, Lakeland College

Alberta Sustainable Tourism Forum
Nakoda Lodge, Morley, Alberta
December 9, 2010

alberta.icrtcanada.ca

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
285
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Socio‐Cultural Best Practices Sheri Heller, Moderator
  • 2.  What is an ethical holiday?  Why does an ethical holiday make sense??
  • 3.  Helps to alleviate poverty ‐ $$ in local hands  Gives back a sense of pride  Can contribute to schools and clinics  Can give more central role to women  Stops flight to cities from rural areas  Does not destroy the environment  Happy hosts equal happy guests
  • 4.  Allows closer connection to other cultures  Invitations to experience culture  We feel a “bit” better about the footprint we leave  It can be great fun  Doesn’t have to be expensive  Can be luxurious or as simple as you want  It benefits the hosts  Safeguards the future of destination  Happy tourists equal happy hosts 
  • 5. Everyone benefits from an  ethical holiday
  • 6. AVOID  GUILT  TRIPS Make sure your next holiday isn’t at someone else’s expense
  • 7.  Experience local cultures and environments  Involving local people in the experience   Fair ‐ helps ensure they will give you an even  warmer welcome   i.e. a local guide from the destination will open  your eyes to the culture and way of life far better  than an expat guide could ever do – they will also  earn a much needed income from you. 
  • 8. Double page spread advertisement for The London Evening Standard. Copy reads: Thousands of holidays to hundreds of places that haven't  been ravaged by mass tourism
  • 9. Earth Rhythms, Celes Davar "...Earth Rhythms has the ability to  transform the ordinary into the  extraordinary. Without reservation, an  adventure with Earth Rhythms is a  moment in time 'when the cup runs over."  ‐ Goerz Family, Manitoba, 2007 
  • 10.  The Canadian tourism experience in  Nunatsiavut will be developed by the  people of Nunatsiavut, in ways that “are  culturally sensitive, economically viable,  and sustainable” ( Fran Williams).  Seeing the invisible through conversations  that matter
  • 11.  “It’s never enough just to tell people about some new  insight. Rather, you have to get them to experience it  in a way that evokes its power and possibility. Instead  of pouring knowledge into people’s heads, you need  to help them grind a new set of eyeglasses so they can  see the world in a new way.” ‐ John Seely Brown, Seeing Differently: Insights on  Innovation (from The World Café book).
  • 12.  Going twice to a salmon fish net with local fishers to  take Atlantic salmon and Arctic char right out of the  net.  Eating fresh Arctic char that has been smoked for  fifteen hours or so in a cold smoke, using blackberry  (crowberry) sod over coals. Mmmmm!
  • 13.  Walked with, learned from, became  educated by, and was inspired by three  amazing stone carvers ‐ Canadian legends  and icons John Terriak, Glibert Hay, and  Walter Piercey. To walk with them is to  understand marble, soapstone, serpentine,  labradorite, and Newfoundland marble  from a spiritual perspective
  • 14.  Listened to the language of Inuktitut being  spoken in five different communities. Tried  sounding out Inuktituk phrases myself.  Saw minke whales in Hamilton Inlet...and  photographed them splashing about in  front of the arriving coastal boat, the  Northern Ranger.
  • 15.  Met a grass‐sewer, who makes a variety of different  functional artworks ‐ mats, bowls, platters, baskets ‐ and learned how to identify "sewing grass" right down  at the salt‐water's edge, and then went to her home to  see works that had been produced by her mother  several decades earlier.
  • 16.  Went up‐stream like the Atlantic Salmon  do, on the English River, to learn about  salmon conservation at a very cool, eight‐ year old salmon trap and fence project  monitoring salmon, char and trout. Was  inspired by the local people and we coined  a phrase that seems to capture their sense  of pride quite well ‐ Guardians of the  English River.
  • 17.  Saw, touched, and watched  Labradorite being cut ‐ a beautiful,  blue‐crystal studded rock that was  polished at a stone plant in  Nain. Talked to the production  manager, walked on beautiful tiles of  Labradorite, and had a new  appreciation for a stone that is loved in  Italy.
  • 18.  Talked with the ships' mates of a  crabbing boat, walked through a large  crab fishing plant being guided by the  production manager, and then tasted  fresh snow crab which was available  locally for $6.50 a pound. WOW!!
  • 19.  Ordered and bought customized stone  carvings, seal‐skin mitts, and seal‐skin  boots direct from the artists.  Traveled with a local guide through some of  the most beautiful islands north of the  Caribbean, watched the sun set, traveled  with a mother eider and her young, and  watched our guide catch an Arctic Char  while thunderheads disappeared in the  east.
  • 20.  Tasted lovage (like celery leaves) for  the first time, and saw eggs in an eider  duck nest close by.  Walked through the lofts, hallways  and floors of historic Moravian  structures.
  • 21.  Experienced the rare Rigolet square dance  and participated in a "stepper down" with  local fiddle and guitar players, and listened  to the beautiful sounds of Inuit drum‐ dancers.
  • 22.  Learned about Innu and Inuit cultures at  the very beautiful and iconic Labrador  Interpretation Centre (which I wish every  Canadian could experience), where I  touched a beautiful 1 metre high Gilbert  Hay amazing soapstone carving.
  • 23.  Met wonderful new friends, artists,  fishers, and entrepreneurs.   Was inspired by the people, their  welcoming nature, and the traditions  that they introduced me to!!!
  • 24.  Adventure Tourism & Outdoor Recreation  Guiding Skills  Leadership Skills  Business Skills
  • 25.  Clear Water Canoeing  Reedan Ranch  Wild Escapes  Paragon Eco‐Adventures  Pure Mountain Adventure
  • 26.  Bev Thornton, Crown of the Continent  Corrine Card, Metis Crossing  Andrew Pratt, Inside Out Experience

×