Comparative Communication Policy Analysis: The Case of Mexico<br />Nanxi Chen<br />Katie Leasor<br />Isadora Vigier de Lat...
Chapter 1: The Development of Mexico’s Initial Backbone<br />Deregulation and the Advent of Competition:<br />only one sin...
The Role of Foreign Investment<br />Legal components of Mexico's new Foreign Investment Act of 1993<br />A number of "stra...
Chapter 2: Mobile Interconnection Policies<br />Problems<br /><ul><li>Telmex essential facilities needed for interconnection
Nationalistic
Dominant position=anticompetitive
Bundled network packages
Overlap and inefficient regulatory authorities
Carriers cannot agree on mobile interconnection rates
High mobile interconnection rates= lack of regulation of calling-party-pays (CPP) cost model
On-net prices in call termination w/incumbent</li></li></ul><li>Regulation Issues<br />Regulating Authorities<br />Secreta...
Policy Recommendations<br />1. Strengthen COFETEL as an independent regulatory body<br />2.Present COFETEL with the author...
Chapter 3: Bridging the Digital Divide via community connectivity  <br />Developing ICTs  to foster economic development +...
Recommendations<br />Define, strengthen and clarify strategic directions for ICT policy and programs <br />Shifting from a...
Chapter 4:The Establishment of E-Government in Mexico<br />Key Policy Documents :<br />1. Vicente Fox’s “Presidential Good...
Barriers to E-Government Implementation in Mexico<br /><ul><li>Loss of Momentum in E-Government Readiness
 Differing levels of ICT usage between federal, state, and local authorities
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In class presentation of the Latin America Consulting Group's findings and recommendations on Mexico's communication policies.

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  1. 1. Comparative Communication Policy Analysis: The Case of Mexico<br />Nanxi Chen<br />Katie Leasor<br />Isadora Vigier de Latour<br />AkintundeAkinmade<br />Melissa Moreland <br />
  2. 2. Chapter 1: The Development of Mexico’s Initial Backbone<br />Deregulation and the Advent of Competition:<br />only one single phone company – Telmex<br />1990 – government sold 44% and maintained control of 56%<br />Telmex – deregulated, new competition began <br />
  3. 3. The Role of Foreign Investment<br />Legal components of Mexico's new Foreign Investment Act of 1993<br />A number of "strategic areas“ continue to be exclusively reserved to the government…<br />Minority foreign ownership, ranging from 10% up to 49%, is allowed…<br />requires a favorable resolution…<br />establishes more precise regulations…<br />enlarged the membership of the National Commission of Foreign Investments<br />
  4. 4. Chapter 2: Mobile Interconnection Policies<br />Problems<br /><ul><li>Telmex essential facilities needed for interconnection
  5. 5. Nationalistic
  6. 6. Dominant position=anticompetitive
  7. 7. Bundled network packages
  8. 8. Overlap and inefficient regulatory authorities
  9. 9. Carriers cannot agree on mobile interconnection rates
  10. 10. High mobile interconnection rates= lack of regulation of calling-party-pays (CPP) cost model
  11. 11. On-net prices in call termination w/incumbent</li></li></ul><li>Regulation Issues<br />Regulating Authorities<br />Secretariat Communications and Transportations (SCT)<br />Federal Telecommunications Commission (COFETEL)<br />Overlapping responsibilities<br />Must regulate interconnection rates for dominant providers<br />Regulation<br />1995 Federal Telecommunications Law (FTL)<br />Fundamental Technical Plan for Interconnection and Interoperability (PFTII)<br />Largest network must interconnect with smaller carriers<br />
  12. 12. Policy Recommendations<br />1. Strengthen COFETEL as an independent regulatory body<br />2.Present COFETEL with the authority to declare Telmex as a dominant carrier who has essential facilities<br />3. Institutionalize a law with interconnection rates w/ unbundled network access;<br />4. Establish and regulate individualized mobile interconnection cost systems according to OECD average rates in CPP countries.<br />25.6% saved for mobile line expenditures <br />
  13. 13. Chapter 3: Bridging the Digital Divide via community connectivity <br />Developing ICTs to foster economic development + digital divide <br />Mexico’s challenges <br />E-Mexico initiative – connectivity, access, empowerment<br /><ul><li>Connectivity </li></li></ul><li>Policy Analysis <br />“ICT Diffusion to Business: Peer Review Country Report Mexico”<br />ICT diffusion to households<br />Internet penetration <br />Telephony<br />DCCs as part of the e-Mexico initiative <br />2. “Proposals on Indicators for the measurement and quantification of community access to ICTs<br />Population indicator <br />Usage patterns of DCCs <br />
  14. 14. Recommendations<br />Define, strengthen and clarify strategic directions for ICT policy and programs <br />Shifting from a Nationalistic  Development or Public Service/Interest Model <br />Public Private Partnerships <br />Feature on Digital Divide in Mexico <br />
  15. 15. Chapter 4:The Establishment of E-Government in Mexico<br />Key Policy Documents :<br />1. Vicente Fox’s “Presidential Good Governance Agenda (2002)<br />The Federal Transparency and Access to Public Government Information Law” (2002)<br />Amendments to Article 6 of Mexican Constitution – 1977 and 2007<br />
  16. 16. Barriers to E-Government Implementation in Mexico<br /><ul><li>Loss of Momentum in E-Government Readiness
  17. 17. Differing levels of ICT usage between federal, state, and local authorities
  18. 18. The Digital Divide
  19. 19. Insecure Financial Backing</li></li></ul><li>Recommendations<br /><ul><li>Cease the constant shuffling of e-government policy to different parts of the government. Instead, house the policy in one part of the government to encourage stability and cohesion.
  20. 20. Continue addressing the digital divide between urban and rural communities. Increased funding to build more Digital Community Centers will be helpful in this regard.
  21. 21. Greater Coordination between state, local, and federal authorities in Mexico through combination of mandates and/or incentives</li></li></ul><li>Chapter 5:Social Media Policy <br />Problems with social media <br />“Los Twitteros”<br />Drug cartels spreading violence <br />Norberto Nazario’s bill<br /><ul><li>“La LeySinde”
  22. 22. Spanish bill to counteract copyright infringement
  23. 23. Shifts power from IPC to judicial courts
  24. 24. IPC can request website be removed
  25. 25. defendant can refute
  26. 26. judge decides verdict and can have site removed</li></li></ul><li>Current Mexican Legislation<br />Article 6 of Mexican Constitution<br /> “Free Speech shall not be restricted neither judicially nor administratively, but when it represents an attack to public morality or individual rights as well as when it produces a criminal offence or disturbs the public order, the right to information shall be enforced by the state”<br />
  27. 27. Current Mexican Legislation<br />Federal Radio and Television Law of 1960<br />Affirm respect for principles of social morality, human dignity and family ties<br />Avoid harmful disturbances to harmonious development of youth<br />Help raise cultural level of people and preserve national characteristics…<br />Strengthen democratic beliefs, national unity and friendship and international cooperation (Article 5)<br />
  28. 28. Recommendations<br />Social media platforms should enhance flow of information within public sphere<br />Social media should not include threats to individuals or groups<br />Should not be used to spread propaganda related to drugs/violence<br />Regulatory body identifies users guilty of violating policy, goes to trial<br />

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