Toefl Integrated Writing Task

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TOEFL Integrated Writing Task with model answer

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  • @dhuntgen the answer is good. The Princeton's 'Cracking the TOEFL iBT' says that it must contain a conclusion. It's a very good example. Thanks.
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  • thank you great example but your answer is not good. i think you do not need write conclusion. Intro one compare and two compare that is it.
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  • @nanditnandan youtube to mp3 converter
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  • very helpful!
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  • how can i get the listening part??i mean in a recorded version not printed
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Toefl Integrated Writing Task

  1. 1. TOEFL Integrated Writing Task with example
  2. 2. What? <ul><li>You have 3 minutes to read a passage on an academic topic </li></ul><ul><li>Then, you listen to a lecture on the same topic, that either supports or casts doubt on the reading </li></ul><ul><li>Finally, you have 20 minutes to plan and write an essay (about 150 to 225 words), that summarizes the lecture and compares it to the reading </li></ul>
  3. 3. Let’s look at an example
  4. 4. The Reading <ul><li>Altruism is a type of behavior in which an animal sacrifices its own interest for that of another animal or group of animals. Altruism is the opposite of selfishness; individuals performing altruistic acts gain nothing for themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of altruism abound, both among humans and among other mammals. Unselfish acts among humans range from the sharing of food with strangers to the donation of body organs to family members, and even to strangers. Such acts are altruistic in that they benefit another, yet provide little reward to the one performing the act. </li></ul><ul><li>In fact, many species of animals appear willing to sacrifice food, or even their life, to assist other members of their group. The meerkat, which is a mammal that dwells in burrows in grassland areas of Africa, is often cited as an example. In groups of meerkats, an individual acts as a sentinel, standing guard and looking out for predators while the others hunt for food or eat food they have obtained. If the sentinel meerkat sees a predator such as a hawk approaching the group, it gives an alarm cry alerting the other meerkats to run and seek shelter. By standing guard, the sentinel meerkat gains nothing - it goes without food while the others eat, and it places itself in grave danger. </li></ul><ul><li>After it issues an alarm, it has to flee alone, which might make it more at risk to a predator, since animals in groups are often able to work together to fend off a predator. So the altruistic sentinel behavior helps ensure the survival of other members of the meerkat’s group. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Notes from the Reading <ul><li>Altruism = gain nothing - opp. Selfish </li></ul><ul><li>Ex.1 Humans share and give – receive no benefit </li></ul><ul><li>Ex.2 Meerkats – Guard alerts others – selfless act - no food + danger for itself </li></ul>
  6. 6. Listening Script <ul><li>You know, often in science, new findings force us to re-examine earlier beliefs and assumptions. And a recent study of meerkats is having exactly this effect. The study examined the meerkat’s behavior quite closely, much more closely than had ever been done before. And some interesting things were found… like about eating habits… it showed that typically meerkats eat before they stand guard – so the ones standing guard had a full stomach! And the study also found that since the sentinel is the first to see a predator coming, it’s the most likely to escape… because it often stands guard near a burrow, so it can run immediately into the burrow after giving the alarm. The other meerkats, the ones scattered about looking for food, are actually in greater danger. </li></ul><ul><li>And in fact, other studies have suggested that when an animal creates an alarm, the alarm call might cause the other group members either to gather together or else to move about very quickly, behaviors that might actually draw the predator’s attention away from the caller, increasing that animal’s own chances of survival. </li></ul><ul><li>And what about people – what about some human acts that might be considered altruistic? Let’s take an extreme case, uh, suppose a person donates a kidney to a relative, or even to a complete stranger. A selfish act, right? But …. Doesn’t the donor receive appreciation and approval from the stranger and from society? Doesn’t the donor gain an increased sense of self-worth? Couldn’t such non-material rewards be considered very valuable to some people? </li></ul>
  7. 7. Notes from Listening <ul><li>Altruism – New findings </li></ul><ul><li>Meerkats – eat before guarding – most likely escape – others more in danger </li></ul><ul><li>Humans – organ donors receive appreciation and approval – valuable </li></ul>
  8. 8. The Question <ul><li>Summarize the points made in the lecture you just heard, being sure to specifically explain how they cast doubt on points made in the reading. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Model Answer <ul><li>Introduction: </li></ul><ul><li>In the lecture, the professor made several points about altruism. He argues that the behavior of animals and humans may not be altruistic. However, the reading states that both humans and meerkats are altruistic and gives evidence for this opinion. The professor’s lecture casts doubt on the reading by using a number of points that are contrary to the reading’s theory that humans and animals are altruistic. </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Body Paragraph 1: </li></ul><ul><li>Firstly the professor casts doubt on the idea that the meerkat sentinels are acting through altruism. According to the professor they, in fact, eat before standing guard, and they are more likely to escape than the rest of the meerkats. This is different from the reading in that the reading states that the sentinels don’t eat before standing guard, and that they are more in danger. The point made by the professor casts doubt on the idea that the meerkat guards are being altruistic. </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Body Paragraph 2: </li></ul><ul><li>Secondly the professor casts doubt on the altruistic acts committed by humans. He claims that humans, who donate organs to relatives or strangers actually receive appreciation and approval from other people. This can be seen as valuable and not totally unselfish. However, the reading states that these people receive no benefit from their actions and that they can be seen as altruistic. The point made by the professor casts doubt on the reading because he shows that these acts are not entirely without benefit for the person who is giving. </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Conclusion: </li></ul><ul><li>In summary, the points made in the lecture contrast with the reading. The professor demonstrates that both the meerkats and humans do not act altruistically as first thought and that the idea of altruism in humans and animals is in doubt. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Ask yourself these questions <ul><li>Have I answered the question? Did I compare the main points of the lecture to the reading. </li></ul><ul><li>Did I organize my response in paragraphs? </li></ul><ul><li>Have I used transition words? </li></ul><ul><li>Does each paragraph start with a topic sentence and end with a concluding sentence? </li></ul><ul><li>Did I paraphrase the main points from the reading and the listening using my own words? </li></ul><ul><li>Have I only used information from the lecture and passage, and not my own ideas? </li></ul>

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