1/8 scale Piper PA-12 “Super Cruiser” ARF      Wingspan:                53.25 in. (1353mm)      Length:                  3...
2
Hobby-Lobby.com is pleased to announce the 1/8 scale Piper PA-12 “Super Cruiser” aspart of its Pilot-1 Golden Age Civilian...
Introduction & History“The end of World War II saw the resumption of private aircraft manufacture and thePiper Aircraft Co...
Before starting, use the contents list to take an inventory and make sure it is complete.If any parts are missing or are n...
1. This manual will help you assemble your   Hobby-Lobby.com Pilot-1 airplane step-by-   step. It does assume that this is...
5. Insert the elevator or rudder pushrod into   the wing so that it sticks out of the aileron   servo cavity as shown. Not...
9. Insert CA hinges and aileron into wing.   Make sure alignment is good with even   spaces at each end of aileron.10. Wit...
13. Use straight edge and pen to mark where    the aileron control horn will be attached.14. Make another mark 8mm (5/16”)...
17. Insert horn and use thin CA or 5-min epoxy    to glue in place.      Repeat steps 1-17 for opposite wing       panel....
21. Using the same technique as the ailerons to    install the elevator. Pre-bend the CA    hinges, deflect downwards, CA ...
25. When completely satisfied with fit and    alignment, use thin CA to glue each joint    thoroughly. There are six joint...
29. Install pushrods and servos as shown.    Make sure servos are centered before    installing horns. The outer holes may...
33. Using the indentations, drill two pilot holes    through elevator. The drill bit should be    smaller than the control...
37. Install four (4) aluminum straps and eight    (8) sheet metal screws on each corner of    landing gear wire as shown. ...
41. Cut four (4) strips of paper the same width    of cowling blocks (approx. 1/2” wide) and 4”    long. Use tape to insta...
45. Fold paper strips out of the way and slightly    enlarge the hole in the fiberglass cowl only!    Here we are using a ...
49. Use canopy glue or craft glue to install side    windows.50. Use canopy glue to install windshield. Use a    wet paper...
53. The tail brace cable should look like this    when complete.54. Prepare the wing struts for assembly. The    front str...
57. When you are satisfied with the    straightness of the wing, use a sheet metal    screw to attach the forward wing str...
61. Please refer to your radio manual for the    following few steps. Please note that some    computer radios have separa...
65. Adjust Rudder LOW RATE travel to get    9/16” (15mm) LEFT and 9/16" (15mm)    RIGHT.    Use 20% expo to soften the cen...
PreflightIf you are new to flying R/C aircraft, or a seasoned modeler, we recommend you have afellow R/C modeler help you ...
24
25
2008 Official Academy of Model Aeronautics National Model Aircraft Safety Code                                            ...
allocation of frequencies for each site, a day-use agreement between sites, or testing which      determines that no inter...
Hobby Lobby International, Inc.  5614 Franklin Pike Circle   Brentwood, TN 37027      1-866-WE-FLY-RC       (1-866-933-597...
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1/8 scale Piper PA-12 “Super Cruiser” ARF

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1/8 scale Piper PA-12 “Super Cruiser” ARF

  1. 1. 1/8 scale Piper PA-12 “Super Cruiser” ARF Wingspan: 53.25 in. (1353mm) Length: 39.5 in. (1003mm) Wing Area: 360 in². (23.23dm²) Weight (w/o battery): 27.5 oz. (780g) Weight (w/ TP2100-3S): 34 oz. (964g) 1
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  3. 3. Hobby-Lobby.com is pleased to announce the 1/8 scale Piper PA-12 “Super Cruiser” aspart of its Pilot-1 Golden Age Civilian Series. The Pilot-1 “Super Cruiser” encompassesthe same attributes in quality construction and handling that made the original a greatdesign. We know you will be pleased with your new model. Its’ beautiful looks, balancedmaneuverability, and docile flying characteristics make it a design that is truly at homecruising the skies at a Pilot-1 Aerodrome near you! Hobby Lobby International, Inc. 5614 Franklin Pike Circle Brentwood, TN 37027 1-866-WE-FLY-RC (1-866-933-5972) www.hobby-lobby.com 3
  4. 4. Introduction & History“The end of World War II saw the resumption of private aircraft manufacture and thePiper Aircraft Company, already well known for the J-3 Cub and the J-5 Cruiser, beganproduction of improved models of these aircraft. These were the Piper PA-11 CubSpecial and the Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser. Walter Jamoneau, who was head of theengineering department at Piper for many years, modified the J-5 into the PA-12. Testflights were made in December 1945, and the first production version of the aircraftappeared in February 1946.”“The original J-5 series were fabric-covered, three-place, high-wing monoplanes, initiallypowered by 75-hp Lycoming engines, and later by 90-hp Lycomings. The PA-12 wasalso fabric-covered, over a welded metal tubular frame and wooden wing spars, andfeatured a Lycoming O-325-C engine, fully cowled. Later models of the PA-12 had asoptional equipment a slightly more powerful engine. Standard features on the PA-12included an electric starter, navigation lights, and a cabin heater. The Piper PA-12Super Cruiser was used in a number of roles, from private pleasure flying to light cargocarrying and many are still flying. It was also successful in the export market.”Manufacturer: Piper Aircraft Corp.Date: 1946Country of Origin: United States of AmericaDimensions:Wingspan: 10.8 m (35 ft 5 in)Length: 6.86 m (22 ft 6 in)Height: 2.08 m (6 ft 10 in)Weight, empty: 454 kg (1,000 lb)Weight, gross: 793 kg (1,750 lb)Top Speed: 184 km/h (115 mph)Engine: Lycoming O-235-C, 100 hpMaterials:Fuselage: steel tube with fabric coverPhysical Description:Single engine, two seat, high wing, monoplane, [cream] and red, first light aircraft to fly around the world(Source: Online, NASM, http://www.nasm.si.edu/ , Jan 3, 2009) Search “Piper Super Cruiser” at thefollowing link: http://www.nasm.si.edu/ 4
  5. 5. Before starting, use the contents list to take an inventory and make sure it is complete.If any parts are missing or are not of acceptable quality, contact Hobby-Lobby.comsupport at 1-866-WE-FLY-RC (1-866-933-5972) Contents List  Fuselage  Battery Hatch  Engine Cowl  Landing Gear  Wheels, Velcro, Tailwheel, Misc Hardware  Windshield and Side Windows  Wings, Center Section, and Ailerons  Tube Wing Joiner and Wing Struts  Horizontal Tail  Vertical Tail  Pushrods Additional Items Required  4-channel Aircraft Radio w/ Receiver (minimum), Computer radio recommended.  2100 mah, 3-cell, 11.1v Lipo Battery (1800-2200mah)  (4) Hitec HS-55 Servos  18 amp Jeti Advance Plus Brushless ESC  AXI 2217/16 Brushless Motor  AXI 22 Series Radial Mount  APC 9x6SF “Slow-fly” Propeller  Soldering Iron and Electrical Solder  5-minute Epoxy Glue  Thin CA Glue and Canopy Glue (craft glue)  Small Phillips Screwdriver  Needle Nose Pliers  Hobby Knife 5
  6. 6. 1. This manual will help you assemble your Hobby-Lobby.com Pilot-1 airplane step-by- step. It does assume that this is not your first airplane. If you need assistance, please ask a local flyer, visit www.rcgroups.com, or call us here at Hobby-Lobby.com. Let’s start by preparing the aileron servos and aileron wire extensions. Wrap the connection with tape or use heat shrink tubing to prevent an accidental disconnect.2. Make sure servo is centered and install large servo horn and screw. Test fit servo on servo cover.3. While holding servo horn centered in the slot, use 5-min epoxy to glue servo blocks in place as shown. Be careful to align side- to-side and up-and-down.4. After 5-min epoxy has set, install servo screws into blocks. Use wire cutters to remove unused side of servo arm. 6
  7. 7. 5. Insert the elevator or rudder pushrod into the wing so that it sticks out of the aileron servo cavity as shown. Note: Be careful not to bend pushrod.6. Tape the aileron wire extension to the end of the pushrod. Pull pushrod and wire through wing panel. Remove tape from pushrod. Repeat for opposite wing panel.7. Install each aileron servo cover with four (4) small sheet metal screws.8. Bend CA hinges as shown. Flex hinges completely back and forth several times to loosen them before installation. 7
  8. 8. 9. Insert CA hinges and aileron into wing. Make sure alignment is good with even spaces at each end of aileron.10. With aileron deflected downward and fitted with no gap between the leading edge of aileron and wing, CA each hinge. Use thin CA, 2 drops per hinge per side.11. Insert wing tube and route aileron wire as shown.12. Insert machine screw and washer into predrilled hole to secure wing panel. 8
  9. 9. 13. Use straight edge and pen to mark where the aileron control horn will be attached.14. Make another mark 8mm (5/16”) as shown. This is where the aileron horn pins will go through the balsa aileron block.15. Temporarily insert aileron control horn into aileron.16. Trace around horn and remove covering with hobby knife. 9
  10. 10. 17. Insert horn and use thin CA or 5-min epoxy to glue in place.  Repeat steps 1-17 for opposite wing panel.18. Insert aileron pushrod “z-bend” into outer hole of servo arm as shown. You may need to use a drill bit, reamer, or hobby knife to enlarge hole in servo arm.19. Adjust clevis to correct length and connect to aileron horn. Slide fuel tubing safety onto clevis to prevent accidental disconnect.20. Look at the covering on the horizontal stabilizer to determine which side is the top. Use a pen to mark the “top.” TOP 10
  11. 11. 21. Using the same technique as the ailerons to install the elevator. Pre-bend the CA hinges, deflect downwards, CA each hinge 2 drops per side. *Note: before gluing, if you feel hinges are too stiff, cut each hinge in half so that they are 1/4” wide by 1/2" long. Then glue normally.22. Temporarily install the wing. Insert countersunk machine screws or use masking tape to hold in place.23. Temporarily install horizontal and vertical stabilizers in place.24. Use 90 degree square to align vertical stabilizer. Check alignment between horizontal stabilizer and wing for level. Measure left and right elevator tip to aileron tip and adjust so that they are even. Some twist can be removed with light heating of covering with heat gun. 11
  12. 12. 25. When completely satisfied with fit and alignment, use thin CA to glue each joint thoroughly. There are six joints total.26. Remove covering from lower front of rudder. Insert and glue tailwheel wire into predrilled hole. Use 5-min epoxy for this step.27. Install rudder and check for alignment.28. Use thin CA for each hinge as you did with the elevator. Be careful NOT to CA the tailwheel bracket to the tailwheel wire. 12
  13. 13. 29. Install pushrods and servos as shown. Make sure servos are centered before installing horns. The outer holes may need to be drilled out slightly for the “z-bend” in the wire.30. Install pushrod clevis to the rudder and elevator pushrods. Use a sheet metal screw to install tailwheel bracket. NOTE: fuel tubing safety shown installed on clevis.31. Measure and mark a line 9mm (5/16”) from the hinge line. Install control horn on clevis.32. Lightly press control horn points into elevator along mark made in previous step. 13
  14. 14. 33. Using the indentations, drill two pilot holes through elevator. The drill bit should be smaller than the control horn pin diameter, approximately 1.5mm (1/16”).34. Trace around horn, remove the covering, install control horn flush.35. Use thin CA on both sides of elevator to secure horn in place. Then use wire cutters to trim of excess pin length flush. NOTE: Make sure to use fuel tubing over each clevis to prevent them from coming open accidentally.36. Repeat the steps above for the ruder horn. Again, make sure to install the fuel tubing safety sleeve on each clevis. 14
  15. 15. 37. Install four (4) aluminum straps and eight (8) sheet metal screws on each corner of landing gear wire as shown. Install wheels and wheel collars.38. Solder motor to speed control. In our application, on the motor side of the ESC, connect black to yellow, red to red, yellow to black. That will assure motor runs the correct direction. Solder your battery connector on the other end of ESC. Here we have used the Male Deans Ultra plug. As with any electric plane, use high quality connectors designed for R/C applications and make good solder connections.39. Install motor mount supplied in AXI accessory kit. Then install motor mount bolts with plywood spacers as shown.40. Use tie wraps or tape to secure ESC (Electronic Speed Control) to motor box. Route wires as necessary to receiver and battery. 15
  16. 16. 41. Cut four (4) strips of paper the same width of cowling blocks (approx. 1/2” wide) and 4” long. Use tape to install paper strips over each cowling block as shown.42. Install cowling. Make sure the paper strips are on outside of cowl. Align cowl with propeller shaft face 5mm (3/16”) in front of cowl. Use masking tape to hold cowl in position for next few steps.43. Use a pen to mark the location for each screw on the paper strips.44. Drill a 1mm (1/32”) pilot hole through paper strip, cowl, and wood mounting blocks for each of the four (4) screws. 16
  17. 17. 45. Fold paper strips out of the way and slightly enlarge the hole in the fiberglass cowl only! Here we are using a reamer but you could use a hobby knife or drill bit. This is done to keep cowl from cracking when inserting the cowl sheet metal screws.46. Install four (4) sheet metal screws to hold cowl in place. Remove all tape and paper strips. Install the APC 9x6SF propeller. An APC “E-series” is shown in this photo but we preferred the “SF-series” after testing.47. Install receiver and hook up all servos and wiring. A 2.4GHz receiver is shown here. If you are using a 72MHz radio, you may wish to route antenna though bottom of plane, along belly, and use clear tape to secure near tailwheel, leaving any extra wire to trail behind plane.48. We used a black permanent marker to color around window frames before installing windows. 17
  18. 18. 49. Use canopy glue or craft glue to install side windows.50. Use canopy glue to install windshield. Use a wet paper towel to clean up any mess before glue dries. Use masking tape to hold everything in place while the glue dries.51. Make one (1) loop with the tail brace cable and crimp. Compress crimp with needle nose pliers as shown.52. Remove tailwheel bracket screw and reinstall with wire loop from above step. Route tail brace cable through predrilled holes in horizontal and vertical stabilizers, then through 2nd crimp, around screw, and back through crimp as shown. Then lightly pull slack out of cable and compress crimp with needle nose pliers. Trim off extra cable. 18
  19. 19. 53. The tail brace cable should look like this when complete.54. Prepare the wing struts for assembly. The front strut is slightly larger than the rear strut.55. Place scrap foam or towel under center section of wing for support. You do not want any load placed on wing tips while installing struts. Sight the wings from behind the airplane to check for any warp or twist. If any is found, twist wing back to straight and lightly use heat gun or iron to remove any wrinkles in covering. Experienced modelers may want to add a degree or two of washout (L.E. down) at the wing tips.56. Install both wing struts to the fuselage with sheet metal screws behind the landing gear as shown. 19
  20. 20. 57. When you are satisfied with the straightness of the wing, use a sheet metal screw to attach the forward wing strut at 1- 5/8” (41mm) from the Leading Edge of the wing.58. Install a sheet metal screw in the rear strut at 5-3/8” (137mm) from the Leading Edge of the wing.59. You may wish to remove struts and soak each hole with thin CA to strengthen attach point. Reinstall sheet metal screws after CA has dried.60. Make a mark on each wing 2” (50mm) back from the leading edge. Install battery and balance model at these marks with the tips of your fingers. Move the battery fore or aft until airplane balances with fuselage level or slightly nose down. Make a mark in CG battery compartment so that you place the battery in the same place every time. Small stick-on lead weights may also be necessary inside engine cowl or near tail to properly balance. 20
  21. 21. 61. Please refer to your radio manual for the following few steps. Please note that some computer radios have separate settings for exponential for high and low rate positions. Make sure you double check all settings before flight. If you are new to programming, check with a local experienced modeler or hobby shop for assistance. The use of Exponential (expo) and Aileron-Rudder mix is recommended.62. Adjust Elevator HIGH RATE travel to get 7/8” (22mm) up and 7/8” (22mm) down. Use 25% expo to soften the center travel 22mm per your radio manual. (JR/Spektrum +25% and Futaba/Hitec -25%) 22mm63. Adjust Elevator LOW RATE travel to get 9/16” (15mm) up and 9/16” (15mm) down travel. Use 20% expo to soften the center travel 15mm per your radio manual. (JR/Spektrum +20% 15mm and Futaba/Hitec -20%)64. Adjust Rudder HIGH RATE travel to get 3/4” (20mm) left and 3/4" (20mm) right Use 25% expo to soften the center travel per your radio manual. (JR/Spektrum +25% and Futaba/Hitec -25%). 20mm 20mm 21
  22. 22. 65. Adjust Rudder LOW RATE travel to get 9/16” (15mm) LEFT and 9/16" (15mm) RIGHT. Use 20% expo to soften the center travel per your radio manual. (JR/Spektrum +20% and Futaba/Hitec -20%). 15mm 15mm66. Adjust each aileron’s HIGH RATE travel to get 9/16” (14mm) UP and 3/16” (6mm) DOWN using the end point adjustment. 14mm Use 25% expo to soften the center travel 6mm per your radio manual. (JR/Spektrum +25% and Futaba/Hitec -25%)67. Adjust each aileron’s LOW RATE travel to get 7/16” (11mm) UP and 1/16” (4mm) DOWN using the end point adjustment. 11mm Use 20% expo to soften the center travel per your radio manual. (JR/Spektrum +20% 4mm and Futaba/Hitec -20%)68. The use of a very small Aileron-to-Rudder mix is also suggested. We used a mix of 12%. This means when you move the aileron control stick to its full position, the rudder will also move about 3/16” (5mm) in the same direction of the control stick. 22
  23. 23. PreflightIf you are new to flying R/C aircraft, or a seasoned modeler, we recommend you have afellow R/C modeler help you with the first flight. Some items you will need to completeon your first preflight are: 1. Aircraft assembled correctly and ready for flight. 2. All control throws and expos are set per this manual. 3. Transmitter fully charged and on correct model. 4. Aircraft balances at the recommended location. (2” aft of wing Leading Edge) 5. Flight Battery is fully charged and secure. 6. All electronics are operating correctly, proper direction, and secure. 7. Complete a radio Range Check per your radio manual. 8. Balance propeller and make sure it is secure. 9. Wait for a calm or light wind day for first flights. 10. If you are new to R/C flying, consider having an accomplished flyer make the first flight and trim the aircraft. A buddy-box training system is also very helpful. FlyingYou will soon find out the Pilot-1 “Super Cruiser” is a real pleasure to fly. Takeoffs,landings, and light aerobatics are easy and well behaved. Even if you have never flowna tailwheel airplane before, the Pilot-1 “Super Cruiser” should be an easy transition. Wepersonally recommend the use of a buddy-box training system for new pilots. Landingsare best accomplished by “three-pointing.” This means that all three wheels shouldtouch at the same time and a little up-elevator is held until the aircraft comes to acomplete stop. Except for takeoff and climb, you will only use about 1/2 throttle tomaintain a scale flying speed. You can expect flight times of 15-20 minutes dependingon battery used and throttle management.We hope you enjoy your Pilot-1 “Super Cruiser” as much as we do!Happy Landings! WARNING – THIS IS NOT A TOY! Radio controlled model aircraft are capable of inflicting serious injury and/or property damage if not assembled, operated, andmaintained in a competent and safe manner. If you are not already experienced with radio controlled models, we strongly suggest that you find an experienced modeler to assist you. WarrantyHobby-Lobby guarantees this kit to be free from defects in both material and workmanship at the date of purchase. This warrantydoes not cover any component parts damaged by use or modification. In no event shall Hobby-Lobby’s liability exceed the original cost of the purchased kit. Completely read through this manual before starting construction. 23
  24. 24. 24
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  26. 26. 2008 Official Academy of Model Aeronautics National Model Aircraft Safety Code GENERAL1. A model aircraft shall be defined as a non-human-carrying device capable of sustained flight in the atmosphere. It shall not exceed limitations established in this code and is intended to be used exclusively for recreational or competition activity.2. The maximum takeoff weight of a model aircraft, including fuel, is 55 pounds, except for those flown under the AMA Experimental Aircraft Rules.3. I will abide by this Safety Code and all rules established for the flying site I use. I will not willfully fly my model aircraft in a reckless and/or dangerous manner.4. I will not fly my model aircraft in sanctioned events, air shows, or model demonstrations until it has been proven airworthy.5. I will not fly my model aircraft higher than approximately 400 feet above ground level, when within three (3) miles of an airport without notifying the airport operator. I will yield the right-of-way and avoid flying in the proximity of full-scale aircraft, utilizing a spotter when appropriate.6. I will not fly my model aircraft unless it is identified with my name and address, or AMA number, inside or affixed to the outside of the model aircraft. This does not apply to model aircraft flown indoors.7. I will not operate model aircraft with metal-blade propellers or with gaseous boosts (other than air), nor will I operate model aircraft with fuels containing tetranitromethane or hydrazine.8. I will not operate model aircraft carrying pyrotechnic devices which explode burn, or propel a projectile of any kind. Exceptions include Free Flight fuses or devices that burn producing smoke and are securely attached to the model aircraft during flight. Rocket motors up to a G-series size may be used, provided they remain firmly attached to the model aircraft during flight. Model rockets may be flown in accordance with the National Model Rocketry Safety Code; however, they may not be launched from model aircraft. Officially designated AMA Air Show Teams (AST) are authorized to use devices and practices as defined within the Air Show Advisory Committee Document.9. I will not operate my model aircraft while under the influence of alcohol or within eight (8) hours of having consumed alcohol.10. I will not operate my model aircraft while using any drug which could adversely affect my ability to safely control my model aircraft.11. Children under six (6) years old are only allowed on a flightline or in a flight area as a pilot or while under flight instruction.12. When and where required by rule, helmets must be properly worn and fastened. They must be OSHA, DOT, ANSI, SNELL or NOCSAE approved or comply with comparable standards. RADIO CONTROL1. All model flying shall be conducted in a manner to avoid over flight of unprotected people.2. I will have completed a successful radio equipment ground-range check before the first flight of a new or repaired model aircraft.3. I will not fly my model aircraft in the presence of spectators until I become a proficient flier, unless I am assisted by an experienced pilot.4. At all flying sites a line must be established, in front of which all flying takes place. Only personnel associated with flying the model aircraft are allowed at or in front of the line. In the case of airshows demonstrations straight line must be established. An area away from the line must be maintained for spectators. Intentional flying behind the line is prohibited.5. I will operate my model aircraft using only radio-control frequencies currently allowed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Only individuals properly licensed by the FCC are authorized to operate equipment on Amateur Band frequencies.6. I will not knowingly operate my model aircraft within three (3) miles of any preexisting flying site without a frequency-management agreement. A frequency management agreement may be an (continued) 26
  27. 27. allocation of frequencies for each site, a day-use agreement between sites, or testing which determines that no interference exists. A frequency-management agreement may exist between two or more AMA chartered clubs, AMA clubs and individual AMA members, or individual AMA members. Frequency-management agreements, including an interference test report if the agreement indicates no interference exists, will be signed by all parties and copies provided to AMA Headquarters.7. With the exception of events flown under official AMA rules, no powered model may be flown outdoors closer than 25 feet to any individual, except for the pilot and located at the flightline.8. Under no circumstances may a pilot or other person touch a model aircraft in flight while it is still under power, except to divert it from striking an individual.9. Radio-controlled night flying is limited to low-performance model aircraft (less than 100 mph). The model aircraft must be equipped with a lighting system which clearly defines the aircrafts attitude and direction at all times.10. The operator of a radio-controlled model aircraft shall control it during the entire flight, maintaining visual contact without enhancement other than by corrective lenses that are prescribed for the pilot. No model aircraft shall be equipped with devices which allow it to be flown to a selected location which is beyond the visual range of the pilot. PARK FLYER SAFE OPERATING RECOMMENDATIONS Inspect your model before every flight to make certain it is airworthy. Be aware of any other radio frequency user who may present an interference problem. Always be courteous and respectful of other users of your selected flight area. Choose an area clear of obstacles and large enough to safely accommodate your flying activity. Make certain this area is clear of friends and spectators prior to launching your aircraft. Be aware of other activities in the vicinity of your flight path that could cause potential conflict. Carefully plan your flight path prior to launch. Abide by any and all established AMA National Model Aircraft Safety Code. 27
  28. 28. Hobby Lobby International, Inc. 5614 Franklin Pike Circle Brentwood, TN 37027 1-866-WE-FLY-RC (1-866-933-5972) www.hobby-lobby.com 28

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