Warc Trends - The Content Revolution: Find the right content strategy for your brand

  • 1,108 views
Uploaded on

Warc's Content Revolution Trend Report looks at key trends in content marketing, with a focus on how brands are using digital content formats. …

Warc's Content Revolution Trend Report looks at key trends in content marketing, with a focus on how brands are using digital content formats.

Get in touch if you would like the full Report and to know more about Warc: enquiries@warc.com

SEMINAR - How to be an Effective Content Marketer
- Friday, 21 March 2014
- The Establishment, Sydney NSW

This half day seminar presented by Warc, TrinityP3 and King Content will help you achieve a practical understanding of what content marketing is, how it works and expert insights into being smarter through strategy development, social media integration and agile data analysis. Our panel of industry leaders will also share their real-world examples and best practice tips that can be applied to your organisation.

Seats are filling up fast, so register now!

http://bit.ly/N4wI0Q

More in: Marketing
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,108
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. SAMPLE VERSION WARC TRENDS THE CONTENT REVOLUTION >> Find the right content strategy for your brand © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. Published: December 2013
  • 2. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Four things to take from this report This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial 1 2 3 4 CONTENT IS HERE TO STAY The interest in content marketing is more than just a fad. It is a result of profound long-term changes within marketing and media. However, it still has questions to answer in terms of where it sits in a long-term brandbuilding strategy, and how brands can measure the effectiveness of content investment. CONTENT STRATEGIES ARE DIVERSIFYING Content strategies are diversifying rapidly in terms of client sectors, formats and objectives. This is clear in the rise of branded video, which can be far more sophisticated than a ‘viral’. Video can now be aligned with the path to purchase; and it can be used to deliver ‘micro-relevance’, engaging small but very important groups of consumers. CONTENT SHOULD BE DISCOVERABLE AND OPERATE AT SCALE Content must be backed by a strategy for how people will find it. Search, social distribution and paid promotion (including native placements) can all help, depending on the type of content being produced. To deliver scale, it’s important to think of ways content can be broken down into its constituent parts and recombined effectively on other platforms. SUCCESS REQUIRES LONG-TERM THINKING Some of the best examples of content marketing show how important it is to take a long-term approach, even for seemingly spontaneous ‘real-time’ marketing. This raises questions about how clients structure their own departments, and their agency teams. © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. www.warc.com
  • 3. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Executive summary This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial C ontent is one of the hottest topics in marketing. But, like many emerging areas, it lacks clarity over definitions (where does advertising stop and content begin?), best practice, and measures of success. It should be pointed out that content marketing is not new. Brands have invested in content such as long-form film, advertiser-funded programming, advertorials or branded magazines for many years. But several things have changed: the range of content brands are able to produce; the types of brand investing in it; and the mindset of the marketers behind it. A growing number of brands are trying to think more like publishers or media companies, and build strategies around content production and distribution. This report focuses on the new forms of content strategy made possible by digital platforms. It looks at ways brands are integrating contentled thinking into their marketing, and in some cases how content is becoming central to those strategies. Content marketing is more than just the industry’s latest fad (Chapter 1). The report argues that the current vogue for content reflects several © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. long-term trends within marketing and media: The long-term interest in ‘engagement’ and the need to earn attention in a cluttered marketplace; The rise of low-cost content production and distribution options; The rise of social, and the interest in sharing and ‘earned media’; The importance of content to search engine optimisation. As a result, investment in content marketing looks set to grow. And as new technology and new platforms Social media platforms such as Facebook have provided a distribution platform for content emerge, content strategies can be expected to diversify rapidly. The report identifies three broad approaches to content marketing (Chapter 2). One is a campaign-led approach, where a content idea forms the heart of a multichannel campaign. A case study from Audi in Brazil shows how a content idea was used to drive all other aspects of the company’s communications, and was adapted to target different audience clusters. There is also a social-led approach that sees brands drip-feed various forms of content onto social platforms; and there is a www.warc.com
  • 4. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Executive summary (contd) This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report customer-led approach that focuses on the role of content at specific stages of the path to purchase. The right model will vary from sector to sector and brand to brand. At the moment, it is clear brands are still in a transition stage – only a minority currently have a specific content strategy. The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here Content discovery Regardless of the approach they take, brands must have a strategy for how consumers will find and view their content (Chapter 3). This is particularly important when reaching beyond a brand’s core users (who will typically make up the bulk of Facebook fans or Twitter followers) to the mass of lighter users. Lighter users are important, as brands typically need to change the purchase behaviour of this group if they are to see sales growth. The strategy for consumer ‘discovery’ of content will vary depending on the objectives of the campaign, but typical methods include paid advertising to ‘seed’ content, using search to intercept consumers at relevant points on the path to purchase, and social distribution. The trend for ‘native’ ad placements is rel- If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. 39% of businessto-consumer marketers in North America say they have a formal content strategy Chapter 2 L’Oréal’s partnership with Zombie Boy resulted in viral video success evant here, as it represents a way of embedding branded content within relevant editorial contexts. One major trend within content marketing has been social-driven ‘real-time’, or ‘newsjacking’ (Chapter 4). Oreo’s famous ‘You Can Still Dunk in the Dark’ message during the blackout of the 2013 Super Bowl is often cited as an example; there are also good cases from brands such as Nike in China. These are an extension of social media strategies; rather than simply pushing text through social channels, brands are turning to images and videos, which are more likely to be passed along. This ‘real-time’ approach also allows brands to maintain momentum between bursts of advertising. However, these examples also show just how hard it is to appear ‘spontaneous’. A current trend is for brands to set up ‘newsrooms’ around major events such as the Super Bowl or the Olympics, where agency teams can work around the clock responding as news unfolds. This is labourintensive, and, if content is really to be real-time, can require a brand to rethink its sign-off process. Brands should also bear in mind that www.warc.com
  • 5. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Executive summary (contd) This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here real-time ideas often need to be balanced by, or incorporated within, a long-term brand-building strategy. Brands and video Another key content trend is the rise of video (Chapter 5). Video has become a key content platform – and its importance is growing as formats such as Vine and Video on Instagram add new, mobile-friendly formats. Companies such as L’Oréal and Unilever have taken sophisticated approaches to their video content to link it closely to their target audiences’ paths to purchase. Some brands are taking content strategies further, and are building themselves into entertainment providers (Chapter 6). They are making long-term investments in their own properties. Red Bull, whose ‘Stratos’ skydiving event was years in the planning, is a good example, as is Absolut Vodka’s work with up-andcoming artists. Brands do not always have to produce their own content; some- If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial Absolut Vodka supports emerging artists and distributes their stories online © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. times there are opportunities to use other people’s (Chapter 7). There are a range of curation strategies: many brands have enlisted the help of their customers in building content; others work with professional content creators and provide a platform for their work. One very interesting development, demonstrated by brands such as Intel and AT&T, is the automated creation of content built around a user’s personal data, pictures and other pre-existing content. The final chapter looks at how online content can combine with other marketing activity. Several cases show how brands can use content strategies to provide significant extra value to sponsorship or live events (Chapter 8). There is huge potential to align TV or sports sponsorships with content strategies, and brands such as Smirnoff have found ways to use live experiences to feed social content. Overall, the report shows how sophisticated, and how varied, content marketing is becoming. As more platforms emerge, and brands work out which strategies deliver results, best practice in this area will continue to evolve. It is a subject that Warc will follow closely in the years ahead. 31% of case studies uploaded to warc.com in 2013 use both social media and online video Chapter 5 www.warc.com
  • 6. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Brands featured in this report This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here FEATURED CASE STUDIES 1 4 5 6 7 2 If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial 1 Dos Equis, The Most Interesting Man in the World, US 6 JetBlue Airways, Get Away With It, US 3 Viagra Anti-Counterfeit Interception, US 3 2 Audi, Social Selling Strategies, Brazil 8 7 Canon, Project Imagin8ion, US 4 Nike, Greatness, China 8 AT&T, Brackets by Six-YearOlds, US 5 o.b. Tampons, A Personal Apology (Just For You), Canada © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. www.warc.com
  • 7. This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here SAMPLE CHAPTER HOW TO DRIVE CONTENT DISCOVERY >> Placing content in front of consumers If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved.
  • 8. Warc Trends >> The content revolution At a glance Finding the right audience This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial KEY INSIGHTS 1 I  n almost all cases, content cannot be expected to go ‘viral’ on its own. Brands producing content should have a strategy for how consumers will find it. Paid advertising, native advertising, search, social and PR can all help, depending on a brand’s objectives. 2 S  ometimes content may only be relevant to people at certain times. How-to videos such as make-up tutorials are an example. Increasingly, search and content strategies are coming together to ensure this type of content reaches the right people at the right time. 3 N  ative advertising has emerged as a way to embed a brand’s content into relevant editorial environments. There are still questions regarding how native content can be scaled across platforms, but investment in this area – particularly native ads on social media – is expected to grow rapidly. 4 A  case study from Pfizer’s Viagra brand, which wanted to intercept men before they bought counterfeit versions of the product, shows how a brand can blend discovery strategies. At the core of the campaign was search, but that was supported by paid online display plus public relations. © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. All of the content was crafted leveraging the most popular ‘buying Viagra’ keywords to ensure a strong presence in organic search Viagra ‘AntiCounterfeit Intervention’ case study www.warc.com
  • 9. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Making content discoverable This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial One of the biggest issues around branded content is how to ensure people actually see it. More traditional forms of content marketing had distribution built in (they would appear on TV, or a magazine would be mailed to a customer list). But new forms of online content marketing do not necessarily have a ready-made audience. So the challenge is how to aid consumers’ discovery of content. One of the most common ways to do this is to combine content with some kind of paid media ‘seeding’ strategy. This was one of the drivers behind the phenomenally popular Dove ‘Evolution’ video, which became one of the most-viewed branded videos of all time. Some types of content, however, are designed to be viewed in particular contexts – a make-up tutorial video, for example, has a very specific audience who may only want to view it at a particular time. So more sophisticated strategies are emerging to hit the right consumers at the right time. One is aligning content strategies with search. The two have been growing closer since the launch © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. of Google Panda (an update to the search engine’s algorithm) in 2011. This meant more emphasis was placed on language, structure and depth. As a result, rich, recent, and visual web pages feature more highly in search. By using search carefully, brands can ensure relevant and helpful content appears at important times in a user’s path to purchase. Both Pfizer and Knorr used this to direct consumers towards their content. Pfizer did so by outbidding competitors on keywords to tell potential buyers of counterfeit Viagra about the dangers of imitation drugs. Knorr worked with Chinese search Dairy Crest promoted its Milk&More delivery service by combining content with search marketing engine Baidu to flag an app and videos aimed at mothers searching for meal ideas. Meanwhile, Dairy Crest used content to boost its search profile and promote its Milk&More door-to-door milk delivery service. It built content around the most important keywords in its category. Social media is another key platform for content discovery, via traditional PCs, tablets and on mobile. In the US, The Harris poll found that 64% of mobile video watchers discovered content via mobile apps, in comparison with traditional search engines, used by only 41%. Furthermore, 67% discovered new videos from social recommendations, with 35% using social media to inform their choices of content consumption. With this in mind, smart brands have utilised ways for Facebook ‘likes’, hashtags and ‘check-in’s’ to be gateways to content. In the homecare sector, Clorox Bleach drove consumers to its online content hub through a competition to win $25,000 by sharing personal stories of ‘bleachable moments’. A Twitter hashtag led users back to the Facebook page, where they could enter the competition and gain access to further content, including www.warc.com
  • 10. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Making content discoverable (contd) This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here advice on cleaning stains – something that would feature highly in search. As is argued in a recent IAB paper, social distribution strategies for consumer brands need to look beyond existing fans or followers; they must try to reach the mass of ‘light users’ of a brand who will drive sales growth. Another important element is that, rather than being a transitory viral buzz campaign, content is stored and can be found long after the original launch. Brands are leveraging this by placing work in specific content community areas, such as Flickr, Tumblr and Pinterest, which cater to niche interests. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, for example, launched a content-led campaign that focused on the typical ‘dilemmas’ of refugees. These were portrayed via visual checkboxes that challenged the viewer to contemplate which choice they would make. These emotive images were placed on Flickr, Pinterest and Twitter. The rise of ’native advertising‘ is relevant to content discovery. Native is an attempt by publishers to sell premium online slots that place advertiser content within an editorial If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial Attractive images for recipes using Chobani are shared on social media © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. context. The value to advertisers is that their content appears alongside similar content, promoting it to people interested in that particular topic. Clorox, for example, is using native spots to provide a content experience through in-feed streams. It has delivered very high engagement scores for some of its content as a result. What ‘native’ is, and how it will evolve, is still open to question. Major issues for big advertisers include scale (how to take a piece of content formatted for one particular native execution and reapply it elsewhere to ensure decent reach) and metrics (brands are often dependent on publishers for engagement scores). Yoghurt brand Chobani is an example of how content discovery is evolving. Tracking company TripleLift’s co-founder says of its client: “Chobani has a thousand beautiful recipe images and they are on Pinterest, Twitter and shared and ‘Liked’ and commented… we’re identifying the most compelling images, and plugging it in natively into food and recipe sites.” When users search for recipes on these sites, they will then discover relevant Chobani content that meets their search objective. Great branded content distributed natively sees great performance Julie Jensen, senior group manager for media, Clorox www.warc.com
  • 11. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Four reasons native is making the news This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial 1 2 3 4 PUBLISHERS NEED AN ALTERNATIVE TO DISPLAY The price of traditional banners has been steadily eroded. Publishers see ‘native’ placements, where sponsored content is integrated into editorial, as premium inventory. They are also keen to sell their services as content producers, as well as advertising platforms. BRANDS NEED HIGH-IMPACT SOLUTIONS As banners become less effective, brands need higher-impact digital solutions. Native placements offer new opportunities to earn attention and engagement via contextually relevant content. The ‘sharing’ functionality built into native formats offers the chance for messages to be passed on. SOCIAL PLATFORMS SEE A CHANCE TO MONETISE Native placements within social media sites, such as ads appearing in a Facebook user’s timeline, are a key revenue-generating tool. They are interesting for advertisers because they have social functionality (liking, commenting, sharing) embedded into them. NATIVE WILL BE CRUCIAL IN MOBILE There are fewer display advertising options on stripped-down mobile sites. Native placements, where a brand’s content is embedded into the editorial feed, are an important way in to mobile for brands. © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. www.warc.com
  • 12. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Native is key to social network revenues This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report Social display Social native $4.57 $3.98 The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here $3.40 $2.85 $2.36 $1.63 US$ billions If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial KEY FACTS US SOCIAL DISPLAY VS NATIVE AD SPEND, 2012-2017 $3.0 2012 $3.7 2013 2012-2017 CAGRs: Total Social CAGR 18.6% Social Display CAGR 16.1% Social Native CAGR 22.9% © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. $4.3 2014 $5.0 2015 $5.7 $6.4 Native advertising, which  embeds advertiser content within the editorial ‘structure’ of a website, is expected to be a key driver of social media advertising in the coming years. Social networks continue to experiment with ways to embed brand content within users’ feeds.   2013 study by BIA/Kelsey A looked at projected advertising investment in social display ads versus native placements. While both are expected to grow to 2017, the faster growth will come from native.  The social native market is ex pected to be worth more than $4.5 billion by 2017, almost three times its 2012 value. 2016 2017 Source: BIA/Kelsey, 2013 www.warc.com
  • 13. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Case study Viagra This is a sample version of The Content Revolution Warc Trends Report The full report is available to subscribers of warc.com, who can download it here If you’re not a subscriber, request a free trial Pfizer used search at the heart of a content discovery drive. Campaign Viagra AntiCounterfeit Interception CHALLENGE Viagra was losing sales to a number of imitation products which were trading on its name. With customers often unaware or uninterested in the difference, the brand needed to find a way to cut through the counterfeit content, as well as educate and inform its target audience (50+ men) in order to ensure they bought legitimate products from approved online pharmacies. Advertiser Pfizer Agency RAPP Market US SOLUTION Pfizer directed men to a documentary about the counterfeit drug industry To capture the attention of customers who may be engaging with counterfeit content, Viagra launched an interception campaign via a mix of paid and earned media. It used carefully bought keywords which ensured it featured highly in organic search, and placed decoy display units which prompted the user to roll over to view. Banners were also placed in targeted online destinations. The style of content also made the campaign newsworthy, allowing the content to be discoverable in three different ways (paid, search and PR). After clicking on the decoy ads, users were then directed to content of a much higher quality than that of its competitors, which in turn pushed the message that this was the same for its product. Housed within a richly branded YouTube channel, the brand revealed cinematic documentary videos (created in partnership with an Academy Award-nominated filmmaker) that revealed the dark side of the counterfeit drug industry. Additional content to bolster the story was supplied through interactive experience tools which provided tips on how to identify fakes © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. Source DMA Echo Awards, 2012 as well as paths to purchase. RESULTS Viagra’s content was even more discoverable than anticipated. The YouTube channel received over one million channel views – 400% more views than the campaign’s target, while a 69% increase in traffic was recorded by The Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites. Positive changes in awareness of illegitimate online pharmacies were also noted in a campaign intercept survey that year. Read the full case study www.warc.com
  • 14. About Warc’s Content Revolution report The Content Revolution looks at key trends in content marketing, with a focus on how brands are using digital content formats. Highlights of the report include:  nsight into why content is popular, and I how brands are using it; Warc Trends >> The content revolution Tapping into the news agenda Executive Summary >> Chapter 1 >> Why content marketing matters Chapter 2 >> Three ways to be content-led Chapter 3 >> How to drive content discovery Chapter 4 >> Social and real-time Chapter 5 >> The rise of video Chapter 6 >> Brands as entertainers Chapter 7 >> Curating content Chapter 8 >> The online-offline connection The rise of social media has led more brands to try out real-time content production and delivery. According to Grant Hunter, co-author of Newsjacking, the real-time revolution requires brands to be both “fast and brilliant” to attain a culture of “urgent genius”. This approach involves producing brand-relevant messaging that taps into topical events. Social media offers an instantaneous distribution channel. While that may sound easy, the implications are huge. It requires a shift in the way brands think about a campaign cycle. It is a challenge to agencies to work together in real time, and sometimes a challenge to companies’ legal teams, who may not have time to ponder every execution carefully for potential issues. As Noah Brier, co-founder of Percolate, put it: “If it’s older than three hours, it’s not real time”. Companies with working models like that of Nissan, which pioneered the use of editorial teams and media ‘hubs’, are becoming increasingly common, causing a noticeable shift in dynamic from ‘brand as publisher’ to ‘brand as newsroom’. Johnnie Walker has created an editorial slant for its Formula One sponsorship Procter & Gamble’s approach sees its 24/7 teams assume a war-room mentality for coverage of high profile events such as the Olympics and the Oscars, a method which allowed the much lauded ‘Tide’ response to a NASCAR crash. It is clear that for some of the most successful brands, this “urgent genius” is the end result, and rooted in a carefully planned environment in which real-time content operates as a hook to a wider brand story. The Super Bowl tweet by Oreo, for example, was the product of a major content-led strategy celebrating the brand’s 100th birthday. The Daily Twist campaign latched onto topical stories by reinterpreting daily news with a customised image. For example, it produced a representation of the Tour de France made out of cookies. Oreo required stakeholders from both agency and brand to meet to create an editorial plan. The brand had already built a large social media following, but this content-led approach marked a step-change in the brand’s social strategy. Some brands partner with media outlets to help achieve this shift in mentality. Virgin Mobile holds weekly editorial meetings with the online social news service Buzzfeed, with which it is partnered to push content for its Virgin Media Live platform. Campbell’s soup arranged a similar strategy with the website to build www.warc.com © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. Warc Trends >> The content revolution  nalysis of three types of content strategy, A and how they fit with a brand’s other marketing activity; The growth of content budgets Executive Summary >>  focus on social and video content; A Significantly increase Chapter 2 >> Three ways to be content-led Contact Ed Pank on +65 3157 6200 or edward.pank@warc.com for the full report, plus more guidance on best practice in content marketing. Remain the same 45% 15% Chapter 4 >> Social and real-time Decrease 3% 9% UK 2% 9% Australia 28% Source: Content Marketing Institute, 2013. *North America data is for B2C marketers only. ORGANISATIONAL GOALS FOR CONTENT MARKETING, % 79 78 North America* 73 Chapter 7 >> Curating content 71 75 67 65 69 71 68 UK Australia 71 64 62 63 63 56 48 Chapter 8 >> The online-offline connection 51 54 50 38 56 42 34 33 28 Customer acquisition Customer retention/ loyalty Engagement Website traffic Sales Lead generation Thought leadership 29 The Content Marketing Institute, a US-based organisation, runs surveys of marketers in three markets around the world, in association with local trade body partners. Results from these surveys in the US, Australia and UK show a consistent picture of growing investment in content marketing. In all three markets, around 60% of marketers are planning to increase their budgets over the next year. There is also a consistent picture in terms of the aims of content marketing. Brand awareness, customer acquisition, customer retention and engagement are the most commonly cited objectives in all three markets. Lead management/ nurturing Source: Content Marketing Institute, 2013. *North America data is for B2C marketers only. www.warc.com © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. Warc Trends >> The content revolution Case study JetBlue Getaways Executive Summary >> Chapter 1 >> Why content marketing matters Chapter 2 >> Three ways to be content-led Chapter 3 >> How to drive content discovery Chapter 4 >> Social and real-time Chapter 5 >> The rise of video JetBlue built its own game show to appeal to consumers who went online for entertainment. CHALLENGE While people knew JetBlue as an airline company, the brand hadn’t managed to secure a strong presence in the cluttered package vacation category, in which it’s ‘Jet Blue Getaway’ product had launched in 2011. Noting that its main competitors marketed their products as transactional, logical services, JetBlue wanted to differentiate itself by being a fun product that ‘put people first’. SOLUTION JetBlue knew that its target audience were heavy consumers of online entertainment, and that many were social gamers. To embrace this, it gave them the opportunity to win a variety of vacation packages through an online game show, in which contestants – by Skyping in from home – appeared on a live streamed real-life studio set, complete with host and ‘television’ crew. Presented as an authentic TV show (structured through a media strategy which aligned the show with actual TV programming, including creating Chapter 6 >> Brands as entertainers units with TV Guide), people were encouraged to watch and participate in the show through experiential activity, email reminders with calendar invites, and page takeovers with interactive ‘applause’ meters. The show was also streamed live through expandable rich media banners, which offered a viewing experience without the user having to leave their webpage. Interest and exposure was then built through real-time reactions on social media sites. The game show format allowed key brand and product information to be conveyed in the form of quiz trivia – making it an unobtrusive message which slotted its audience directly and entertainingly into the story. Campaign Get Away With it Advertiser JetBlue Airways Agency Mullen Market US Source North American Effies, 2013 RESULTS Chapter 7 >> Curating content Chapter 8 >> The online-offline connection An online game show showed JetBlue as a fun product that ‘put people first’ © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. © Copyright Warc 2013. All rights reserved. North America* 24% 49% Unsure 2% 10% 28% 49% 12% Chapter 5 >> The rise of video Brand awareness  ase studies that show how content has C been used effectively by brands. Increase 15% Chapter 3 >> How to drive content discovery Chapter 6 >> Brands as entertainers KEY FACTS CONTENT INVESTMENT PLANS (OVER NEXT 12 MONTHS) Chapter 1 >> Why content marketing matters Visitors to the site spent an average of 10 minutes watching or participating, (the equivalent to watching 20 :30 second TV spots) while the live-streaming banners recorded an average of 7 minutes. After the game, awareness of JetBlue Getaways more than doubled, recording the highest search volume for ‘JetBlue Getaways’ since the product launched in 2011. Read the full case study www.warc.com www.warc.com