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Breakout - Airheads Macau 2013 - 11ac Migration (7200)
 

Breakout - Airheads Macau 2013 - 11ac Migration (7200)

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Breakout - Airheads Macau 2013 - 11ac Migration (7200)

Breakout - Airheads Macau 2013 - 11ac Migration (7200)
Topics Include:
802.11ac Overview
Migration to 7200

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  • What you really need here is the minimum acceptable throughput that the application will require -It is advisable to measure this yourself on multiple platforms - manufacturer/supplier numbers are good - but Trust and Verify is always a better career bet.
  • 11ac is an extension of 11n. Those of you who were around for the 11n roll out will notice a lot of déjà vu. The big difference with 11ac is that end users care about wireless speeds now. Client devices are differentiating themselves with 11ac support (HTC One, Samsung GS4, MacBook Air)
  • While 11ac allows for more spatial streams in the standard. The first generation will be 3 streams like 11n. None of the throughput improvements will come from the number of streams.Additionally, you have to have as many antennas as you have streams. Which requires more space, power, etc. So devices won’t really change from where they are.
  • More on channel widths later. The important thing to know right now is that you get more than a 1 for 1 improvement in throughput. And we think must customers can deploy 80 mhz channels without significant problems now that the standard does a better job of detecting channel width. The AP will automatically fall back to 20 or 40 mhz channels.
  • FCC: US, Australia Canada, Colombia, Korea, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan (all core countries), and moreOrange = cannot be used due to doplar weather radar interferenceBlue = added 144 which opened a 20, 40 and 80 mhz channelPattern = FCC DFS requiredFCC has talked about adding additional channels but there is no official word on that yet. Unknown is new hardware will be required because we don’t know what the DFS requirements will be.Most customers will deploy 80 MHz channels. There is a dynamic per packet channel width decision made in 11ac. Some of that was standard in 11n but the sensitivity was too low (-62) and it has been increased to -72 and seems to work now.High density deployments and special cases may still want 20 or 40 mhz channels depending on utilization and use case.
  • ETSI: EU, Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Thailand, UAE (all core countries), and moreJapan: similar restrictions, different power limits, DFS detailsPattern = ETSI DFS required
  • Same range for rates that also exist in 11n, add 2 more rates in coreNote that coverage areas may expand using 11ac TxBF
  • Rates are ~doubled, but range is slightly reduced
  • Signal level: assumes a site survey is done with an AP transmitting at +17dBm
  • 2.4 ghz will mostly remain 20 mhz 11n so those speeds will still be on the network5 ghz will transition to 80 mhz in most cases from the 40 mhz. Single stream smart phones see some of the largest benefits from 11ac going from 72.2 mhz (2.4 ghz) to 433. Many phones are making the switch from 2.4 to 5 as part of the 11ac migration.Single 11ac client, 5GHz radio13x3 11ac VHT80 N/ATCP UP/Down, UDP UP/Downd-tunnel 825870,920930     tunnel650672,800776     bridge825865,920945
  • TurboQAM: proprietary solution to support 11ac 256-QAM modulation in 2.4GHz, potentially offering 33% throughput increase (600Mbps)802.3af POE:No USBNo second Ethernet port1X3:1ss 2.4GHz radio2x3:2ss 5GHz radio
  • Dual personality ports can be used for out of band management. Put them on a separate vlan and protect them from broadcast storms.A single PSU is enough to power the controller. Load sharing really has to do with the hot swappable nature. They are 350 watt PSUs.7240 and 7220 will bookend the M3. The 7210 will replace the 3600. The 3600 will drop in price and become the low end controller.Expansion slot is for DPI. S3500 expansion slot is for session based firewall capabilities that the controller has today. For DPI you will have to have a controller.No more distinction between CAP and RAP capacity counts. The AP count is the AP count.Field replaceable fan with variable speed control and front to back cooling.Dedicate HA interconnect using the GE port.
  • The migration to 11ac won’t fundamentally change the applications users use. It sill increase the airtime available for users by clearing up the air faster since users will take less time to get their data.For the large software company, they would need 10x 7240s to manage all of those APs. 10x 7240s would result in 400 gpbs firewall throughput. That means 97% of their firewall throughput would be idle. For the university, they would need 2x 7240s forthat many APs. That means 80 gbps of firewall throughput, leaving 74 gigs free, or 92% idle.

Breakout - Airheads Macau 2013 - 11ac Migration (7200) Breakout - Airheads Macau 2013 - 11ac Migration (7200) Presentation Transcript

  • 11ac Migration CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 1 #airheadsconf
  • Changing networksCapacity & Bandwidth More devices • Average 3 devices per user • Smartphone, tablets, laptops, ultrabooks CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved More applications per device • Average 40 apps per mobile device • Estimates > 300 billion app downloads by 2016 More traffic • HD mobile video, video telepresence, collaboration programs • Tablet traffic ~ 3.4x greater than smartphone traffic 2 Shift in W-Fi Usage • Pervasive, primary access • Mission critical • Multimedia – Voice, IPTV, older legacy media transport systems (i.e. cable TV) #airheadsconf
  • What type of Apps are on your network ? Personal Apps Throughput Requirements Corporate Apps Throughput Requirements FaceTime 400 Kbps Lync Desktop Sharing 1.5 Mbps AirPlay Video 1 Mbps SIP Softphone 90 Kbps Citrix Internet + Office 150 Kbps Netflix 1.5 or 5 Mbps* 250 Kbps Pandora 150 Kbps Webex iPad Desktop Share 1.5 Mbps YouTube 500 Kbps WebEx High Quality Video Skype 500 Kbps GoToMeeting Desktop Share 500 Kbps HTTP 500 Kbps Desktop Backup 10 – 50 Mbps Printing 1 Mbps • Mix of personal and corporate applications • Design for the highest bandwidth demand that you intend to support • Multiply this number by the number of connections that you need to support CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 3 #airheadsconf
  • Currently shipping 11ac Clients 11ac Clients – Samsung Galaxy S4 (1x1:1 11ac) • 40 million units by late October (6 months) – HTC One (1x1:1 11ac) • 5 million sold in first 45 days – Moto X, Moto droid Ultra, etc. – 2013 MacBook Air (2x2:2 11ac), iMacs and MacBook Pros – Select Dell and Alienware laptops – USB dongles (2x2:2 11ac) • Look for USB 3.0 No significant impact on client battery life CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 4 #airheadsconf
  • 11ac Overview 11ac Overview CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 5 #airheadsconf
  • 802.11ac Technology Overview Think of 11ac as an extension of 11n • 11ac introduces • 11n specification introduced: • • • • • • • 2.4 and 5 GHz supported Wider channels (40 MHz) Better modulation (64-QAM 5/6) Additional streams (up to 4 streams) Beam forming (explicit and implicit) Backwards compatibility with 11a/b/g 11n Greenfield • 5 GHz supported • Wider channels (80 MHz and 160 MHz) • Better modulation (256-QAM) • Additional streams (up to 8) • Beam forming (explicit) • Backwards compatibility with 11a/b/g/n • Refer to http://www.80211.ac.net for in-depth information CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 6 #airheadsconf
  • More Spatial Streams Spec allows up to 8 spatial streams (4 max in 802.11n) – 8SS performance will only be possible where both devices have 8 antennas – Space, power and cost constraints will dictate the number of streams supported by the client • Smart phones – 1 stream • Tablets – 2 stream • Laptops – 2 or 3 streams – Speed of connection is decided by the device with the lowest number of streams. Adding spatial streams increases throughput proportionally. – Assuming multipath conditions are favorable: • Two streams offer double the throughput of a single stream • Eight streams increase throughput eight-fold CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 7 #airheadsconf
  • Wider Channels 80 MHz channel widths supported in first generation – 80 MHz is 4.5x faster than 20 MHz – 80 MHz is contiguous – Per packet dynamic channel width decisions Future releases will allow for 160 MHz channel widths – 160 MHz can be either contiguous or in two noncontiguous 80 MHz slices – 2x faster than 80 MHz CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 8 #airheadsconf
  • 802.11ac Channels (FCC) UNII I and UNII II 2x 80 MHz 4x 40 MHz 8x 20 MHz Channel Freq (MHz) Band Edge 5150 36 40 5180 44 52 56 60 5220 5200 48 5240 5260 5280 5300 64 5320 Band Edge 5350 UNII II extended 3x 80 MHz 6x 40 MHz 12x 20 MHz Weather Radar Channel Freq (MHz) Band Edge 5470 Band Edge 100 104 108 112 116 120 124 128 132 136 140 144 5500 5520 5540 5560 5580 5600 5620 5640 5660 5680 5700 5720 5725 Channel Band Edge 149 153 157 161 165 Freq (MHz) 5725 5745 5765 5785 5805 5825 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved US UNII III 1x 80 MHz 2x 40 MHz 5x 20 MHz Band Edge 5850 9 #airheadsconf
  • 802.11ac Channels (ETSI) UNII I and UNII II 2x 80 MHz 4x 40 MHz 8x 20 MHz Channel Freq (MHz) Band Edge 5150 36 5180 40 5200 44 48 52 56 60 5220 5240 5260 5280 5300 64 5320 Band Edge 5350 UNII II extended 2x 80 MHz 5x 40 MHz 11x 20 MHz Channel Freq (MHz) Band Edge 5470 100 104 108 112 116 120 124 128 132 136 140 Band Edge 5500 5520 5540 5560 5580 5600 5620 5640 5660 5680 5700 5725 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 10 #airheadsconf
  • Channel Usage with two APs CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 11 #airheadsconf
  • Coverage Example (-70dBm) Maximum sustained rates using 3x3 11n AP or 3x3 11ac AP with 11n clients 450 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 12 405 360 #airheadsconf
  • Coverage Example (-70dBm) Upgrade to 3x3 11ac AP with 11ac clients (40Mhz Channels) 450 405 360 540 600 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 13 #airheadsconf
  • Coverage Example (-70dBm) Upgrade to 80MHz channels with 11ac clients 878 780 585 975 1170 1300 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 14 #airheadsconf
  • Relative Range 802.11ac Rates MCS0 MCS1 MCS2 MCS3 MCS4 MCS5 MCS6 MCS7 MCS8 MCS9 MCS0 MCS1 MCS2 MCS3 MCS4 MCS5 MCS6 MCS7 MCS8 MCS9 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 15 Signal level and relative range -dB r 87 63 85 50 83 40 79 25 76 18 71 10 66 5.6 63 4.0 58 2.2 51 1.0 Datarate 40MHz 45 90 135 180 270 360 405 450 540 600 80MHz 97.5 195 292.5 390 585 780 877.5 975 1,170 1,300 #airheadsconf
  • 11ac Beamforming: Notes 11ac beamforming is standards based – 11ac beamforming represents the consensus view of the 1000’s of contributors to the standards process 11ac beamforming is implemented in baseband. – It works with all antenna subsystems – The total number of beamforming combinations is effectively infinite Works with clients that support 11ac beamforming function – This is at a minimum all 11ac client devices using Broadcom chipsets 11ac actively tracks users so has a recent channel estimate between the AP and client that is updated frequently 16 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 16 #airheadsconf
  • Channel state info: implicit and explicit beamforming Beamformer Request for sounding Beamformee Beamformer Sounding frames Implied CSI sounding frames Beamformee Sounding feedback Actual CSI Beamformed frames Beamformed frames Explicit feedback for beamforming (802.11n and 802.11ac) 1 (Beamformer) Here’s a sounding frame 2 (Beamformee) Here’s how I heard the sounding frame 3 Now I will pre-code to match how you heard me Implicit feedback for beamforming (802.11n not 802.11ac) 1 (Beamformer) Send me a sounding frame 2 (Beamformee) Here’s the sounding frame 3 OK, I’ll pre-code assuming you hear me like I heard you Implicit and explicit feedback for beamforming 17 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 17 #airheadsconf
  • Practical Application of 11ac CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 19 #airheadsconf
  • AP Placement • Don’t plan for the highest data rate everywhere • Similar AP density to 11n capacity based networks • Consider client density and desired data rates • a/b/g networks should be redesigned • Existing processes/behavior should continue • Recommend predictive planning with spot checks CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 20 #airheadsconf
  • AP Throughput > 1Gbps “How fast can I go?” – Simple question with very complicated answer – Depends on many factors • • • • Device type Distance Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) Access Point configuration • • • • Channel width Number of Spatial Streams Short/long guard intervals Link aggregation – Your mileage WILL vary CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 21 #airheadsconf
  • Max Data Rates per Client Type Channel bandwidth Transmit – Receive antennas Typical client scenario Max individual link rate Max aggregate link rate 40 MHz 3x3 PC 606 Mbps 606 Mbps 80 MHz 1x1 Smartphone 433 Mbps 433 Mbps 80 MHz 2x2 Tablet, PC 867 Mbps 867 Mbps 80 MHz 3x3 PC 1300 MBPS 1300 MBPS 160 MHz 1x1 Smartphone 867 Mbps 867 Mbps 160 MHz 2x2 Tablet, PC 1.73 Gbps 1.73 Gbps 160 MHz 4x Tx AP, 4 clients of 1x Rx Multiple smartphones 867 Mbps per client 3.47 Gbps 160 MHz 8x Tx AP, 4 clients with total of 8x Rx Digital TV, set-top box, tablet, PC, smartphone 867 Mbps to two 1x clients 1.73 Gbps to one 2x client 3.47 Gbps to one 4x client 6.93 Gbps CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 22 #airheadsconf
  • Maximum datarates (in Mbps) for each channel width 802.11n 1SS 802.11n 2SS 802.11n 3SS 802.11ac 1SS 802.11ac 2SS 802.11ac 3SS 20 MHz 72.2 144.4 216.7 96.3 192.6 288.9 40 MHz 150 300 450 200 400 600 80 MHz N/A N/A N/A 433.3 866.7 1,300 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 23 #airheadsconf
  • AP-224/225 802.11ac Campus Access Point • Enterprise class 3x3 802.11ac • Aggregate TCP platform throughput performance >1Gbps • Two platform models: – AP-224: external antennas (3x, dual band) – AP-225: integrated antennas – Advanced Cellular Coexistence (ACC) support • Dual radio: – 802.11n 3x3:3 HT40 2.4GHz (450Mbps), support for “TurboQAM” – 802.11ac 3x3:3 HT80 5GHz (1.3Gbps) • Wired interfaces – Network: 2x 10/100/1000Base-T Ethernet, with MACSec support – USB 2.0 host interface, console port, DC power • Will require 802.3at PoE (or DC power) for full functional operation – Functional, but capabilities reduced when powered from 802.3af POE • Enterprise temperature range, plenum rated, TPM CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 24 #airheadsconf
  • Switch Recommendations • • • • 1 gig uplinks from AP to switch 10 gig uplinks from the switch to the core 802.3at power for full performance Advanced filtering requires a little more power • Significant out of band interference filtering requires a little more power • Most 2.4 ghz only devices are single stream • Deploying a new building? Consider • Dual cables or cat6a for future generations of wireless 802.3af 802.3at 2.4 GHz radio 1x3:1 3x3:3 5 GHz radio 3x3:3 3x3:3 Ethernet ports 1 2 USB Disabled Enabled CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 25 #airheadsconf
  • Better 11n than 11n • Improved rate vs range – Newer generation radios with better receive sensitivity – Improved antenna design – Better out of band interference mitigation • Better performance at high client densities – Faster CPU – More Memory CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 26 #airheadsconf
  • Rate vs Range: AP-225 vs AP135 23% 23% 43% 39% 40% 56% 5.35x 3.32x AP-225 11n performance is considerably better than AP-135 -> up to 5.35x AP-225 TCP down throughput @ 120ft 128Mbps CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 27 #airheadsconf
  • Multi Client TCP Bidirectional Throughput (Mbps) 2x2:2 MacBook Air laptops CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 28 #airheadsconf
  • 11ac Controller Support CAMPUS 7240 Scale 2048 CAP/2048 RAP 32K Users 40 Gbps Firewall 7210 7220 512 CAP/512 RAP 16K Users 20 Gbps Firewall LARGE OFFICE 1024 CAP/1024 RAP 24K Users 40 Gbps Firewall M3 3600 128CAP/512 RAP 8K Users 4 Gbps Firewall 512 CAP/1024 RAP 8K Users 20 Gbps Firewall 3400 3200 64 CAP/256 RAP 4KUsers 4 Gbps Firewall 32 CAP/128 RAP 2K Users 3 Gbps Firewall CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved Performance 29 #airheadsconf
  • 7200 Series Controller: Front and Rear Views LCD Display 7200 Front View Capacity • 7210/7220/7240 • 512/1024/2048 APs • 16K/24K/32K users Interfaces Expansion Slot for DPI dual personality 4x 10GBaseX Console ports (RJ-45 or SFP) (SFP+) Ports RJ-45 or usb I/O, HA, MGMT usb • 4x 10G SFP+ • 2x Dual personality ports 10/100/1000Base-T (RJ-45) or 1000Base-X (SFP) Modular Components 7200 Rear View • Power Supply • Fan Tray • Expansion Slot Management Hot-Swappable, Load-Sharing, Redundant Power Supplies Field-Replaceable Fan Tray • Console RS-232 (RJ-45) or usb • LCD Display Coverage for 6.5M sq ft, equivalent to the area of the Pentagon, the office space of 3 Empire State Buildings or 60 Home Depots. Capacity to stream NetFlix for every student in a large university. 30 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 30
  • Oversubscription • Oversubscription is part of every network that is deployed. • Real Customer Data – Large Software company • 20,000 APs • 55,000 users • Never exceeded 12 gbps combined throughput – Medium Sized US University • 4,000 APs • 15,000 Students • Never exceeded 6 gbps combined throughput CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 31 #airheadsconf
  • Client Health • Client throughput compared to client capabilities • 11g client getting an effective 27 mbps would be 50% healthy • Combines data rates, retries, dropped packets into one metric • Calculated and updated every minute CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 32 #airheadsconf
  • Wave 2 of 11ac • What will wave 2 802.11ac deliver? • MU-MIMO • Use AP MIMO resources more effectively • Transmit data to multiple 1x1 and 2x2 devices simultaneously • 4x4:4SS • Benefit of additional stream mostly for MU-MIMO • Not anticipating any 4x4:4SS client devices • No impact on max platform throughput • VHT160? Most likely not • Only 2 160MHz available in entire 5GHz band • Not practical, but there could be competitive pressure • When will it be available? • Radio chipsets available late 2014 • Products in 2015 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 33 #airheadsconf
  • 802.11ad • Targeted to clean up a cluttered desk or TV cabinet • Likely not appropriate for traditional AP use. But can be interesting for related applications like wireless docking, high-capacity WLAN hotspots, AP backhaul/aggregation, etc. • It is being investigated (but no product plans as of yet) • Standard is available, certification program in place • Wi-Fi Alliance WiGig Alliance • 60GHz band, three channels in most countries (each 2.16GHz wide), each providing up to 6.8Gbps PHY datarate • No MIMO • Challenges: Non-Line of Sight (NLOS) connections, range, penetrating obstacles (and people) CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 34 #airheadsconf
  • Thank You CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 35 #airheadsconf
  • How do I get to the data rate for a given MCS? Basic Symbol Rate – 312.5 KHz – 3.2 s Cyclic Extension – t/4 0.8 s – t/8 0.4 s Bits Per Tone – – – – – 36 BPSK QPSK 16 QAM 64 QAM 256 QAM CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 1 2 4 6 8 36 #airheadsconf
  • Sub-carriers 26 carriers 28 carriers 26 carriers fc -10MHz +10MHz -10MHz 57 carriers -10MHz fc +10MHz 56 subcarriers (52 usable) for a 20 MHz HT mode (802.11n) channel 52 subcarriers (48 usable) for a 20 MHz non-HT mode (legacy 802.11a/g) channel -20MHz 28 carriers 57 carriers fc +10MHz +20MHz 114 subcarriers (108 usable) for a 40 MHz HT mode (802.11n) channel 121 carriers -40MHz -30MHz -20MHz 121 carriers -10MHz fc +10MHz +20MHz +30MHz +40MHz 242 subcarriers (234 usable) for a 80 MHz VHT mode (802.11ac) channel An 80+80MHz or 16MHz channel is exactly two 80MHz channels, for 484 subcarriers (468 usable) OFDM subcarriers used in 802.11a, 802.11n and 802.11ac CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 37 #airheadsconf
  • Raw Data Rates #Tones * Bits per Tone * Symbol Rate – 16 QAM, 20 MHz – 52 * 4 * 0.3125 = 65 Mbps 38 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 38 #airheadsconf
  • Correct for Cyclic Extension 20 MHz BPSK QPSK 16 QAM 64 QAM 256 QAM t/4 13 26 52 78 104 Corrected for cyclic extension 20 MHz t/8 BPSK 14.4 QPSK 28.9 16 QAM 57.8 64 QAM 86.7 256 QAM 115.6 Mbps Mbps Mbps Mbps Mbps 40 MHz BPSK QPSK Mbps 16 QAM Mbps QAM 64 Mbps QAM 256 t/4 27 54 108 162 216 Mbps Mbps Mbps Mbps Mbps t/8 30 60 120 180 240 Mbps BPSK Mbps QPSK Mbps 16 QAM Mbps Mbps 64 QAM Mbps Mbps 40 MHz BPSK QPSK 16 QAM 64 QAM 256 QAM 256 QAM CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 39 t/4 58.5 117 234 351 468 Mbps Mbps Mbps Mbps Mbps 80 MHz BPSK QPSK 16 QAM 64 QAM 256 QAM 39 80 MHz t/8 65 130 260 390 520 Mbps Mbps Mbps Mbps Mbps #airheadsconf
  • Apply FEC Coding 40 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 40 #airheadsconf
  • QAM constellations Amplitude +1 Quadrature -1 Quadrature -1 Amplitude -1 64-QAM constellation Quadrature +1 16-QAM constellation Quadrature +1 Quadrature +1 Amplitude -1 Amplitude +1 Quadrature -1 Amplitude +1 Amplitude -1 256-QAM constellation Constellation diagrams for 16-, 64-, 256-QAM CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 41 #airheadsconf
  • CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 42 #airheadsconf