Best Practices on Migrating to 802.11ac Wi-Fi
 

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Moving towards a new Wi-Fi technology does not have to be too much of an undertaking. Of course, that's assuming great deal of planning and attention to detail in terms of defining the clear steps on ...

Moving towards a new Wi-Fi technology does not have to be too much of an undertaking. Of course, that's assuming great deal of planning and attention to detail in terms of defining the clear steps on how to get there. In this session we will discuss 802.11ac placement, Wi-Fi coverage and capacity planning for 802.11ac devices and how to take advantage of 802.11ac transmit beamforming
To learn more, visit us at http://www.arubanetworks.com/wlan. Join the discussion at https://community.arubanetworks.com

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Best Practices on Migrating to 802.11ac Wi-Fi Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Best Practices on Migrating to 802.11ac Wi-Fi Peter Lane March, 2014
  • 2. CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2013. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved 2 #airheadsconf Changing networks- Capacity & Bandwidth More devices • Average 3 devices per user • Smartphone, tablets, laptops, ultrabooks More applications per device • Average 40 apps per mobile device • Estimates > 300 billion app downloads by 2016 More traffic • HD mobile video, video telepresence, collaboration programs • Tablet traffic ~ 3.4x greater than smartphone traffic Shift in W-Fi Usage • Pervasive, primary access • Mission critical • Multimedia – Voice, IPTV, older legacy media transport systems (i.e. cable TV)
  • 3. 3 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf What type of Apps are on your network ? • Mix of personal and corporate applications • Design for the highest bandwidth demand that you intend to support • Multiply this number by the number of connections that you need to support Personal Apps Throughput Requirements FaceTime 400 Kbps AirPlay Video 1 Mbps Netflix 1.5 or 5 Mbps* Pandora 150 Kbps YouTube 500 Kbps Skype 500 Kbps HTTP 500 Kbps Corporate Apps Throughput Requirements Lync Desktop Sharing 1.5 Mbps SIP Softphone 90 Kbps Citrix Internet + Office 150 Kbps Webex iPad Desktop Share 250 Kbps WebEx High Quality Video 1.5 Mbps GoToMeeting Desktop Share 500 Kbps Desktop Backup 10 – 50 Mbps Printing 1 Mbps
  • 4. 4 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Clients 11ac Clients – Samsung Galaxy S4 (1x1:1 11ac) • 40 million units by late October (6 months) – HTC One (1x1:1 11ac) • 5 million sold in first 45 days – Moto X, Moto droid Ultra, etc. – 2013 MacBook Air (2x2:2 11ac), iMacs and MacBook Pros – Select Dell and Alienware laptops – USB dongles (2x2:2 11ac) • Look for USB 3.0 No significant impact on client battery life
  • 5. 5 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf 802.11ac Technology Overview Think of 11ac as an extension of 11n • 11n specification introduced/leveraged: • 2.4 and 5 GHz supported • Wider channels (40 MHz) • Better modulation (64-QAM) • Additional streams (up to 4 streams) • Beam forming (explicit and implicit) • Backwards compatibility with 11a/b/g • 11ac introduces • 5 GHz supported • Even wider channels (80 MHz and 160 MHz) • Better modulation (256- QAM) • Additional streams (up to 8) • Beam forming (explicit) • Backwards compatibility with 11a/b/g/n • Refer to http://www.802- 11.ac.net for in-depth information
  • 6. 6 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf More Spatial Streams • Spec allows up to 8 spatial streams (4 max in 802.11n) – 8SS performance will only be possible where both devices have 8 antennas – Space, power and cost constraints will dictate the number of streams supported by the client • Smart phones – 1 stream • Tablets – 2 stream • Laptops – 2 or 3 streams – Speed of connection is decided by the device with the lowest number of streams. • Adding spatial streams increases throughput proportionally. – Assuming multipath conditions are favorable: • Two streams offer double the throughput of a single stream • Eight streams increase throughput eight-fold
  • 7. 7 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Wider Channels • 80 MHz channel widths supported in first generation – 80 MHz is 4.5x faster than 20 MHz – 80 MHz is contiguous – Per packet dynamic channel width decisions • Future releases will allow for 160 MHz channel widths – 160 MHz can be either contiguous or in two non- contiguous 80 MHz slices
  • 8. 8 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf 802.11ac Channels (FCC) Channel Freq (MHz) UNII I and UNII II 2x 80 MHz 4x 40 MHz 8x 20 MHz Band Edge Channel Freq (MHz) 5850 US UNII III 1x 80 MHz 2x 40 MHz 5x 20 MHz Channel Freq (MHz) UNII II extended 3x 80 MHz 6x 40 MHz 12x 20 MHz 36 4844 5240 56 6460 Band Edge 5180 5200 5220 5240 5260 5280 5300 5320 5350 Band Edge 5150 149 161157153 5745 5765 5785 5805 Band Edge 5725 165 5825 100 112108 116104 120 128124 5500 5520 5540 5560 5580 5600 5620 5640 Band Edge 5470 136 140 Band Edge 5680 5700 5725 132 5660 144 5720 Weather Radar
  • 9. 9 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf 802.11ac Channels (ETSI) Channel Freq (MHz) UNII I and UNII II 2x 80 MHz 4x 40 MHz 8x 20 MHz Channel Freq (MHz) UNII II extended 2x 80 MHz 5x 40 MHz 11x 20 MHz 36 4844 5240 56 6460 Band Edge 5180 5200 5220 5240 5260 5280 5300 5320 5350 Band Edge 5150 100 112108 116104 120 128124 5500 5520 5540 5560 5580 5600 5620 5640 Band Edge 5470 136 140 Band Edge 5680 5700 5725 132 5660
  • 10. 10 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Channel Usage with two APs
  • 11. 11 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf ARM Primary channel mapping • ARM chooses primary 80, 40 and 20 MHz channels • Same way as existing channels are chosen • Show AP details will show the channels selected • 36+ means
  • 12. 12 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Max Data Rates per Client Type Channel bandwidth Transmit – Receive antennas Typical client scenario Max individual link rate Max aggregate link rate 40 MHz 3x3 PC 606 Mbps 606 Mbps 80 MHz 1x1 Smartphone 433 Mbps 433 Mbps 80 MHz 2x2 Tablet, PC 867 Mbps 867 Mbps 80 MHz 3x3 PC 1300 MBPS 1300 MBPS 160 MHz 1x1 Smartphone 867 Mbps 867 Mbps 160 MHz 2x2 Tablet, PC 1.73 Gbps 1.73 Gbps 160 MHz 4x Tx AP, 4 clients of 1x Rx Multiple smartphones 867 Mbps per client 3.47 Gbps 160 MHz 8x Tx AP, 4 clients with total of 8x Rx Digital TV, set-top box, tablet, PC, smartphone 867 Mbps to two 1x clients 1.73 Gbps to one 2x client 3.47 Gbps to one 4x client 6.93 Gbps
  • 13. 13 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf 802.11ac Channel Width and Datarate • Maximum datarates (in Mbps) for each channel width 802.11n 1SS 802.11n 2SS 802.11n 3SS 802.11ac 1SS 802.11ac 2SS 802.11ac 3SS 20 MHz 72.2 144.4 216.7 96.3 192.6 288.9 40 MHz 150 300 450 200 400 600 80 MHz N/A N/A N/A 433.3 866.7 1,300
  • 14. 14 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Coverage Example 1. Sample coverage for 3x3 11n AP (or 3x3 11ac AP with 11n clients) in HT40 mode •Coverage area sustains MCS5 and up 360 405 450
  • 15. 15 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Coverage Example 2. Upgrade to 3x3 11ac AP with 11ac clients, still using 40Mhz channels (VHT40) •Radius for 600Mbps (MCS9) area is 1/4 of that for 450Mbps (MCS7) 360 405 450 540 600
  • 16. 16 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Coverage Example 3. Equivalent range for clients using 80MHz channels (VHT80) •Rates roughly double, relative range for each of the MCS rates does not change, but 80MHz range is ~70% of equivalent (same MCS) 40MHz range 780 878 975 1170 1300 585
  • 17. 17 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Relative Range 802.11ac Rates Datarate 40MHz 80MHz MCS0 45 97.5 MCS1 90 195 MCS2 135 292.5 MCS3 180 390 MCS4 270 585 MCS5 360 780 MCS6 405 877.5 MCS7 450 975 MCS8 540 1,170 MCS9 600 1,300 Signal level and relative range -dB r MCS0 87 63 MCS1 85 50 MCS2 83 40 MCS3 79 25 MCS4 76 18 MCS5 71 10 MCS6 66 5.6 MCS7 63 4.0 MCS8 58 2.2 MCS9 51 1.0
  • 18. 18 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Beamforming: Notes • AP 22x series has 11ac beamforming support in 2.4 and 5 GHz bands • Works with clients that support 11ac beamforming function – This is at a minimum all 11ac client devices using Broadcom chipsets – Support will have to come to all devices to compete with Broadcom offering • 11ac beamforming is standards based – first standard that is doing this the “right” way – 11ac beamforming represents the consensus view of the 1000’s of contributors to the standards process • 11ac beamforming is implemented in baseband. – It works with all antenna subsystems – The total number of beamforming combinations is effectively infinite • 11ac actively tracks users so has a recent channel estimate between the AP and client that is updated frequently 18
  • 19. 19 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Channel state information, implicit and explicit beamforming estimation 19 Implicit feedback for beamforming (802.11n not 802.11ac) 1 (Beamformer) Send me a sounding frame 2 (Beamformee) Here’s the sounding frame 3 OK, I’ll pre-code assuming you hear me like I heard you Request for sounding sounding frames Explicit feedback for beamforming (802.11n and 802.11ac) 1 (Beamformer) Here’s a sounding frame 2 (Beamformee) Here’s how I heard the sounding frame 3 Now I will pre-code to match how you heard me sounding frames Beamformed frames feedback from sounding Implicit and explicit feedback for beamforming Beamformer BeamformeeBeamformeeBeamformer Beamformed frames Actual CSI Implied CSI
  • 20. 20 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Limits • If the number of scatterers increases do the degrees of freedom continue to increase? • The simple answer is no. • In order to be effective the system has to be able to resolve the various paths • As the angle between paths decreases the ability to resolve them also decreases • Also, paths with large power differences will not contribute to the system performance 20
  • 21. 21 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf AP Throughput > 1Gbps • “How fast can I go?” – Simple question with very complicated answer – Depends on many factors • Device type • Distance • Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) • Access Point configuration • Channel width • Number of Spatial Streams • Short/long guard intervals • Link aggregation – Your mileage WILL vary
  • 22. 22 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Pros and Cons of 802.11ac • Pros 1. APs can accommodate more users/devices • Increased capacity 2. Standards based Explicit Beam-forming increases SNR • Higher data rates over longer distances 3. 256-QAM • Increased throughput at high SNRs • Improved modulation and coding techniques 4. Multi-User MIMO (future generations) • Improved utilization of RF capacity 5. Use of 5 GHz spectrum • More non-overlapping channels • Quieter RF environment
  • 23. 23 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Pros and Cons of 802.11ac • Caveats 1. Hardware update required to support 802.11ac • Some features will not be available on legacy devices 2. Increased product cost • Small premium for 3x performance • Prices will come down 3. Supporting 802.11ac will result in increased load on the infrastructure 4. AP-225 requires 802.3at (PoE+) for full functionality & performance • However, no restrictions on 11ac radio with 802.3af POE • USB disabled, second Ethernet port disabled, 2.4GHz radio in 1x3:1SS mode
  • 24. 24 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Wave 2 of 11ac • What will wave 2 802.11ac deliver? • MU-MIMO • Use AP MIMO resources more effectively • Transmit data to multiple devices simultaneously: for example 4SS AP streaming data to four 1SS clients simultaneously • 4x4:4SS • Benefit of additional stream mostly for MU-MIMO • Not anticipating any 4x4:4SS client devices • Adds 33% to max datarate • VHT160 • Doubles max datarate • Practical problem: only 2 VHT160 channels available in entire 5GHz band • Max 5GHz radio throughput triples again!
  • 25. 25 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf 11ad and what it means • 60GHz band, three channels in most countries (each 2.16GHz wide), each providing up to 6.8Gbps PHY datarate • No MIMO • Challenges: Non-Line of Sight (NLOS) connections, range, penetrating obstacles (and people) • Targeted to clean up a cluttered desk or TV cabinet • Likely not appropriate for traditional AP use. But can be interesting for related applications like wireless docking, high-capacity WLAN hotspots, AP backhaul/aggregation, etc. • It is being investigated (but no product plans as of yet) • Standard is available, certification program in place • Wi-Fi Alliance WiGig Alliance
  • 26. 26 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf AP Platforms not supported in 6.4 • In AOS 6.4, support for the following AP platforms will be removed: – Legacy (a/b/g): AP-60/61, AP-65/65WB, AP-70, AP-85, RAP-2WG – First gen 11n: RAP-5WN – Other: RAP-5 (wired) • Note that all of these platforms are EOS now: – AP-60/61, AP-65, AP-70: 6/1/2011 – AP-120/121, RAP-5: 2/1/2012 – AP-85: 5/1/2012 – AP-65WB: 10/1/2012 – AP-124/125: 8/1/2013 – RAP-2WG, RAP-5WN: 11/1/2013 • This implies that AOS 6.3 will be around at least until 11/1/2018 • AP 12x will be supported in AOS 6.4
  • 27. 27 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf MacBook Pro 3SS NIC
  • 28. 28 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Samsung Galaxy S4
  • 29. 29 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Indoor Campus APs
  • 30. 30 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf AP-114/115: 3 stream 11n AP • Enterprise class baseline 3x3 802.11n – Physical Design: similar to AP-224/225 (but smaller) – Reuse AP-130, AP-220, RAP100 mount accessories • Two platform models: – AP-114: external antennas (3x, dual band diplexed) – AP-115: integrated antennas (6x) • Advanced Cellular Coexistence (ACC) support • Dual radio 802.11n 3x3:3 (450Mbps) – SDM, CSD, STBC, MRC, LDPC support • Wired interfaces – Network: 1x 10/100/1000Base-T Ethernet (no MACSec) – USB 2.0 host interface, console port, DC power • Power: 12Vdc or 802.3af/at POE, 12.5W max (excluding USB) • Enterprise temperature range, plenum rated, TPM
  • 31. 31 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf AP-224/225 802.11ac 3x3 AP • Enterprise class 3x3 802.11ac • Aggregate TCP platform throughput performance >1Gbps • Two platform models: – AP-224: external antennas (3x, dual band) – AP-225: integrated antennas – “Advanced Cellular Coexistence” support • Dual radio: – 802.11n 3x3:3 HT40 2.4GHz(450Mbps), support for “TurboQAM” – 802.11ac 3x3:3 HT80 5GHz (1.3Gbps) – 11ac beamforming supported in both bands • Wired interfaces – Network: 2x 10/100/1000Base-T Ethernet, with MACSec support – USB 2.0 host interface, console port, DC power • Will require 802.3at PoE (or DC power) for full functional operation – Functional, but capabilities reduced when powered from 802.3af POE • Enterprise temperature range, plenum rated, TPM $1,295 U.S. List
  • 32. 32 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf 11ac Controller Support Performance Scale CAMPUS LARGE OFFICE 3200 32 CAP/128 RAP 2K Users 3 Gbps Firewall 3400 64 CAP/256 RAP 4KUsers 4 Gbps Firewall 3600 128CAP/512 RAP 8K Users 4 Gbps Firewall 7210 512 CAP/512 RAP 16K Users 20 Gbps Firewall M3 512 CAP/1024 RAP 8K Users 20 Gbps Firewall 7220 1024 CAP/1024 RAP 24K Users 40 Gbps Firewall 7240 2048 CAP/2048 RAP 32K Users 40 Gbps Firewall
  • 33. 33 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf 7200 Series Controller: Front and Rear Views 7200 Front View 7200 Rear View Capacity • 7210/7220/7240 • 512/1024/2048 APs • 16K/24K/32K users Interfaces • 4x 10G SFP+ • 2x Dual personality ports 10/100/1000Base-T (RJ-45) or 1000Base-X (SFP) Modular Components • Power Supply • Fan Tray • Expansion Slot Management • Console RS-232 (RJ-45) or usb • LCD Display 4x 10GBaseX (SFP+) Ports Expansion Slot for DPI LCD Display usb Field-Replaceable Fan Tray Hot-Swappable, Load-Sharing, Redundant Power Supplies dual personality ports (RJ-45 or SFP) I/O, HA, MGMT Console RJ-45 or usb Coverage for 6.5M sq ft, equivalent to the area of the Pentagon, the office space of 3 Empire State Buildings or 60 Home Depots. Capacity to stream NetFlix for every student in a large university.
  • 34. 34 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Customer scale points • Large Software company – 20,000 APs – 55,000 users – Never exceeded 12 gbps combined throughput • Medium Sized US University – 2,000 APs – 12,500 Students – Never exceeded 6 gbps combined throughput
  • 35. 35 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf AP Uplink Considerations • Assess the environment: Brownfield vs. Greenfield • 2 x Ethernet/LAG cables is NOT a requirement for wave 1 11ac • For a Greenfield environment (new building), laying out 2 x Ethernet cables makes it future proof • For a Brownfield environment (an existing site with 1 x Ethernet cable), you don’t loose anything • TODAY – 2 x Ethernet cables are used by a few customers • salt and pepper designs – PoE redundancy
  • 36. 36 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf PoE Considerations 802.3af 802.3at 2.4 GHz radio 1x3:1 3x3:3 5 GHz radio 3x3:3 3x3:3 Ethernet ports 1 2 USB Disabled Enabled • af vs. at: What do you get vs. loose • Customers who do not have at; why is it not a big problem • Most 2.4 GHz only devices are single stream • 2.4 GHz has limited throughput already due to 20 MHz channels • Competitors don’t have a USB port to begin with • 2nd Ethernet port isn’t that important. And competitors can’t have it both ways. It can’t be important when its not powered and unimportant when it is. • Advanced filtering requires a little more power
  • 37. 37 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf AP Replacement Considerations • If the existing 802.11n network was designed for capacity then 1-for-1 AP replacement with 802.11ac AP is viable. • Capacity = APs that are 2500 sq.ft apart • If the existing network is designed for supporting • 802.11 a/b/g • Or a coverage only 802.11 n • Redesign will be required • Redesigning might includes a combination of both physical and virtual survey. • Depending on the environment
  • 38. 38 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf AP Forwarding Mode Considerations • Tunnel mode is the preferred forwarding mode • For high performance using tunnel mode – enable Jumbo frames to support the increased AMSDU • Expect a 10 – 15 % drop in performance when jumbo frame is not enabled (800 vs. 600 Mbps) • D-Tunnel mode can be used to achieve high performance (equivalent of tunnel mode + jumbo frames • NOTE: D-tunnel mode also takes a minor hit after 50 clients per radio
  • 39. 39 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf 11n + 11ac co-existence & Channel Considerations • 11n + 11ac = No problem • Assuming HD deployments (APs are 15 meters apart) • 80 Mhz – Technology Demonstration and greenfield 802.11ac ONLY • 40 Mhz – 802.11n compatibility modes to avoid client driver issues • 20 Mhz - 802.11a and 802.11n NON-DFS environments • Assuming Ultra HD deployments (APs less than 15 meters apart): Use one of the following • Consider using 20 MHz channels to get more re-use • Tx power considerations, and use of CSR (available 6.3.1.3) should be considered to avoid CCI • Use of DFS as appropriate
  • 40. 40 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Transmit Power Considerations • Assess the environment • How much are my AP’s able to hear each other? • Modern offices like Facebook, square, twitter etc. (hoteling environments) – a lot • Traditional offices like MSFT (lots of offices) and K12 classrooms – Not as much • Universities there is a mixture of both – Variable • How much is “too much” • If the Rx channel busy is > 30% during slow time • It is due to ACI and CCI • This has a direct impact on performance; worsens during peak hours • What is the solution – Tx power on AP’s, high data rates on clients and low ACI/CCI • Guidance • For modern offices • Min EIRP – 9 dBm; Max EIRP – 12 dBm • For Traditional offices • Default (Min EIRP – 9 dBm; Max EIRP – Max) • For environments that are a mix • Default (Min EIRP – 9 dBm; Max EIRP – Max) • Set 802.11a basic and beacon rate to 24 Mbps; 802.11g basic & beacon rate to 12 Mbps to avoid CCI/ACI and increased channel utilization
  • 41. 41 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Profile level Configuration Cheatsheet Profile Configuration Summary RF Management Profile Power: Min – 9, Max – 12 for modern offices Min – 9, Max – max for traditional offices Min – 9, Max – max for mixed environment Measure Rx channel busy during slow time in all cases Channel Use 40 MHz (when mixing 11n and 11ac) use 80 MHz (greenfield 11ac environment) (case by case: DFS needs to be enabled for re-use) Use 20 MHz channels for APs closer than 30 feet (for ultra HD deployments Use CSR - set to 25 or 30 (if running 6.3.1.3)
  • 42. 42 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Profile level Configuration Recommendations Profile Configuration Summary SSID Profile 802.11a basic & beacon rate- 24 Mbps 802.11g basic & beacon rate – 12 Mbps HT-SSID Profile Default settings VHT Profile Default settings
  • 43. 43 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Configuration recommendations for bake-offs • AOS 6.3.1.2 build 41701. This is a technology release • Use D-Tunnel forwarding mode. • Try to use Cisco Switch in the set up. Use 1G uplink in case Aruba switch is used. 10G has caused problems. • Enable end-to-end jumbo frame support. • Use 20 Chariot end point pairs for single client, 4 pairs for multi-client test case. • Use high performance TCP script with 1MB file size for TCP tests. • For small packet test, use UDP script and modify the send/receive buffer size and data rate according to test case. • Use Max EIRP for during our test. Adjust power levels as necessary for maximum PHY rates. • Set AMSDU to 3 for BE,BK and VI under Ht-SSID Profile. • Set ARM WIDS override to Dynamic For more information see https://arubapedia.arubanetworks.com/arubapedia/index.php/AP_225_vs_Cisco_3702i_Performance_Results_and_Bake-off_Recommendations
  • 44. 44 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Configuration recommendations for bake-offs ! rf arm-profile "arm-disable" assignment disable min-tx-power 127 ! rf dot11a-radio-profile "custom-a" channel 100E tx-power 127 spectrum-monitoring disable-arm-wids-functions Dynamic arm-profile "arm-disable" ! rf dot11g-radio-profile "custom-g" channel 11 spectrum-monitoring disable-arm-wids-functions Dynamic arm-profile "arm-disable" ! For more information see https://arubapedia.arubanetworks.com/arubapedia/index.php/AP_225_vs_Cisco_3702i_Performance_Results_and_Bake-off_Recommendations
  • 45. 45 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Configuration recommendations for bake-offs wlan ht-ssid-profile "ArubaShowcase-AS-htssid_prof" temporal-diversity max-tx-a-msdu-count-be 3 max-tx-a-msdu-count-bk 3 max-tx-a-msdu-count-vi 3 ! wlan ssid-profile "ArubaShowcase-AS-ssid_prof" essid "ArubaShowcase-AS" opmode wpa2-psk-aes max-clients 150 wmm wmm-vo-dscp "56" wmm-vi-dscp "40" wmm-be-dscp "24" wmm-bk-dscp "8" wpa-passphrase xxxxxxxxxxxxx mcast-rate-opt ht-ssid-profile "ArubaShowcase-AS-htssid_prof" ! For more information see https://arubapedia.arubanetworks.com/arubapedia/index.php/AP_225_vs_Cisco_3702i_Performance_Results_and_Bake-off_Recommendations
  • 46. 46 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Configuration recommendations for bake-offs ! wlan virtual-ap "ArubaShowcase-AS-vap_prof" aaa-profile "ArubaShowcase-AS-aaa_prof" ssid-profile "ArubaShowcase-AS-ssid_prof" vlan 881 forward-mode decrypt-tunnel band-steering dynamic-mcast-optimization dynamic-mcast-optimization-thresh 100 ! ap-group "ArubaShowcase-AS" virtual-ap "ArubaShowcase-AS-vap_prof" virtual-ap "MBP-AS-vap_prof" dot11a-radio-profile "custom-a" dot11g-radio-profile "custom-g" ap-system-profile "apsys_prof-iiu58" ! For more information see https://arubapedia.arubanetworks.com/arubapedia/index.php/AP_225_vs_Cisco_3702i_Performance_Results_and_Bake-off_Recommendations
  • 47. 47 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Resources • Evaluating a Config template on ASE for 11ac • 11ac deployment guidelines on Arubapedia • Click here • Other specific guidance • Early 11ac swat team • Email dl-solutions@arubanetworks.com
  • 48. 48 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf General • “Can I simply do a 1:1 replacement of all my existing Access Points?” –It depends on a number of factors • Original AP density/RF environmental challenges • Types of applications currently running – or expected to be running – over the existing network • Existing network infrastructure • i.e. Gigabit uplinks • 802.11at port availability
  • 49. 49 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Capacity Planning • Plan on a minimum of 3 devices per person – IP phone, tablet, laptop – Consider number of VLANs and subnets based on these increased amounts of devices – Consider how many of these devices will be active on the network concurrently • Plan on ~50 active devices per AP • 802.11at on all edge switches • Review existing controllers to ensure adequate performance • All Aruba controllers running version 6.3 of ArubaOS will support 802.11ac, however network performance will vary depending on increased throughput resulting from higher 802.11ac speeds (don’t expect much out of the 6x0)
  • 50. 50 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf The Planning Process • Perform an initial environment evaluation: – Is there an existing wireless network? • Is it capacity or coverage based? – What types of client devices will be used? – What applications will be deployed? • Select the proper APs and antennas for the deployment: – Internal • Ceiling mount • Standard option – External • Wall mount • Unique coverage pattern needed (aisles in a warehouse) • Outdoor coverage
  • 51. 51 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf The Planning Process • VisualRF Plan (Virtual site survey): – VisualRF Plan is the Aruba pre-deployment site planning tool. – Covers most standard deployments – Outdoor, warehouse, non-standard environments may need extra work • Physical site surveys: – Best way to characterize the RF propagation of a given facility – Time consuming – Costly
  • 52. 52 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf RF Planning recommendations • Consider using 80 MHz channels in a 5-channel plan – ARM will manage primary 20 and 40 MHz channel selections – Will require use of 3 DFS channels • All 11n Tx power recommendations continue 2 1 3 4 5 2 1 3 4 5 2 1 3 4 5
  • 53. 53 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Antenna Gain: 5 dBi 2G: 3x3:3 11ac (2.4 GHz) 5G: 3x3:3 11ac (5.15 to 5.875 GHz) 11ac Beamforming Conducted Tx Power 2G: 23 dBm per branch (27.7 aggregate) MAX EIRP = 36 dBm 5G: 23 dBm per branch (27.7 aggregate) MAX EIRP = 36 dBm Power Interface: AC and 802.3at (PoE+) Power Consumption: 23 W WAN + LAN Port Advanced Cellular Coexistence IP66 and IP67 -40° to +65°C No Heater. Start and operate. AP-270 Series 53
  • 54. 54 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Advanced Cellular Coexistence • Proliferation of DAS and new LTE bands at 2.6 GHz are creating issue for Wi-Fi solution • All new APs introduced by Aruba in the last 12 months and going forward have implemented significant filtering into the 2.4 GHz radio portion to combat this • Design solution – Use high-linear LNA followed with a high-rejection filter to achieve rejection target and little sensitivity degradation; – Design target: Minimal Sensitivity degradation with -10dBm interference from 3G/4G networks (theoretical analysis).
  • 55. 55 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Interfaces • Interfaces Designed for easier field installation PoE-In; WAN Port LAN Port AC Port Console/Reset Ground
  • 56. 56 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf • Unit does not look like radio • Omni antennas are fully integrated in the chassis • Resembles video cameras and light fixtures • Multiple Bracket Options AP-275: Campus Access / Outdoor Retail 56 8.5”
  • 57. 57 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Hanging bracket 57
  • 58. 58 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Reduced install time 58 • Brackets are designed to be • Strapped onto poles • Lagged into wall • Once bracket is in place unit slides in and is held with 2 screws. Slide Chassis into Bracket Lock in Place
  • 59. 59 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Mechanical Solution – Ease for manufacturing AC power module PCBA
  • 60. 60 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf 175 versus 27x
  • 61. 61 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Super High-density PCBA • Super High-density Thermal design 190mm 124mm Surge protection for outdoor deployment Surge protection for outdoor deployment For thermal design For EMC design For EMC design WiFi chipsets Six PAs CPU & DDR2 PoE Circuits Top view Bottom view Ethernet PYHs
  • 62. 62 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Antenna Subsystem Prototype
  • 63. 63 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Why a purpose built 11ac AP • Can spread out the antennas – Required for optimal MIMO operation • No redundant hardware – No disabled radios or radios talking over each other • Optimize Power Consumption • Bring the latest processor to bear – 11ac data plane requirements will overwhelm older processors 63
  • 64. 64 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Cisco vs Aruba test results • Onsite customer bakeoff results • Tests run by Aruba • Cisco config set by Cisco • AOS 6.3.1.2-AcPerf vs Cisco 7.6.100.0 • AOS config info • D-tunnel • AMSDU 3 • ARM/WIDS Dynamic • Static Channel • Hybrid Spectrum enabled • All tests run in Charriot • 1500 byte packets unless otherwise specified
  • 65. 65 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Single-Client TCP Peak Performance (1 x 3SS MacBook Pro) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 DOWNSTREAM UPSTREAM BI-DIRECTIONAL 828 609 596600 502 522 Aruba AP-225 Cisco AP-3700
  • 66. 66 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Multi-Client TCP Performance (20 x 2SS MacBook Air, 1500-Byte) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 DOWNSTREAM UPSTREAM BI-DIRECTIONAL 378 384 415 335 314 299 Aruba AP-225 Cisco AP-3700
  • 67. 67 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Small Packet Multi-Client Performance (20 x 2SS MacBook Air, Downstream UDP) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 256-BYTE 512-BYTE 159 312 37 109 Aruba AP-225 Cisco AP-3700
  • 68. 68 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Multi-Client Performance with Interference (20 x 2SS MacBook Air, 15% duty cycle) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 DOWNSTREAM UPSTREAM BI-DIRECTIONAL 316 326 384 276 259 258 Aruba AP-225 Cisco AP-3700
  • 69. 69 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Always use the latest firmware 495 493 107 400 400 100 450 440 98 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 6.3.1.2 No Spectrum 6.3.1.2 Spectrum 6.3.0.1 TCP Up TCP Down TCP Bi
  • 70. 70 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf HW: AP225 vs Cisco 3600 + 11ac Module • AP-225 has 60% more processing capacity -> Higher throughput – Cisco AP 3600 has dual-core CPU that can be run @ 500MHz with 2 cores or @ 800 Mhz using just one core -> only one core used today @800MHz – Aruba AP-225 has dual core CPU @ 800 MHz • AP-225 has 100% more RAM -> Room for future features – Aruba AP-225 has 512MB or RAM, Cisco AP 3600 only 256MB • AP-225 has better antenna design than Cisco 11ac module -> Better range with AP-225 • Cisco 11ac module can support only max 50 clients • Cisco 3600 has only 1GE port
  • 71. 71 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf ClientMatch™ Enables 802.11ac Wi-Fi Match to another AP DEVICE TYPE INTERFERENCELOCATION CONGESTION REAL-TIME RF CORRELATION Enables use of 802.11ac Wi-Fi rates  98% of mobile devices with higher signal quality  94% better performance for “sticky” clients  No client-side software required Patent: 8,401,554
  • 72. 72 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf ClientMatch for Link & Traffic Optimization (L2-3)
  • 73. 73 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf RF Performance Aruba OS Dashboard
  • 74. 74 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf AOS 6.3 RF support * ClientMatch will override Band Steering, Spectrum load balancing, and Station handoff . a/b/g only 11n 11ac (AP-225) ClientMatch No impact Supported Supported Band steering Supported Supported* No impact Spectrum load balancing Supported Supported* No impact Station handoff assist Supported Supported* No impact All settings will be visible at all times. They will only affect some APs though.
  • 75. 75 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf 88% Higher Network Performance with ClientMatch 218.3 147.4 218.2 116 0 50 100 150 200 250 Aruba Cisco SystemAggThroughput System Throughput in a Static vs. Mobile Environment Static Environment Mobile Environment Aruba Vendor X • Aruba has no change in total system performance • Vendor X has a 21% drop due to sticky clients • Better per-AP throughput for Aruba across the board 88%
  • 76. 76 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Sticky client impact on the network • Simple example – 1 user connecting at 6 Mbps and 9 users at 130 Mbps – If they each download a 10 MB (80 Mb) file • 6 Mbps is ~5 Mbps useful • 6 Mbps connection takes 16 seconds • 130 Mbps is 85 Mbps useful • 130 Mbps takes 0.94 seconds – So 16 + 9*0.94 = 24.5 seconds for 800 Mb ~32.5 Mbps versus 85 Mbps for all users connecting at 130 Mbps. • This is exacerbated in built out networks as one slow user will affect all APs and clients that can hear it
  • 77. 77 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf CLI Commands (Aruba3200) #show rf arm-profile default | include Client Client Aware Enabled Client Match Enabled Client Match report interval (sec) 30 Allows Client Match to automatically clear unsteerable clients after ageout Enabled Client Match Unsteerable Client Ageout Interval 2 0 Client Match Sticky Client Check Interval (sec) 3 Client Match Sticky client check SNR (dB) 25 Client Match SNR threshold(dB) 10 Client Match Sticky Min Signal 70 Client Match Restriction timeout (sec) 10 Client Match Load Balancing threshold (%) 20 Client Match VBR Stale Entry Age (sec) 120 Client Match Max steer failures 3 Client Match Load Balancing client threshold 10 Client Match Load Balancing SNR threshold (dB) 30
  • 78. 78 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Tunnel vs D-tunnel • Jumbo frame • AMSDU • High client count performance • Max throughput , low client best in D-tunnel • Max throughput, high client count, best in tunnel
  • 79. 79 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved #AirheadsConf Preparing your wired network for .11ac • Ensure minimum 1 Gbps uplink ports for the APs • Ensure 10 Gbps uplink from edge switches to core – One 11ac AP can max out a 1 Gbps uplink on a switch • Ensure uplink ports support 802.3at (PoE+) – 802.3af can be used, but performance will be reduced
  • 80. 80
  • 81. 81 CONFIDENTIAL © Copyright 2014. Aruba Networks, Inc. All rights reserved Thank You #AirheadsConf