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  • 1. MnemonicLearning VIIThe Boom of the 1920s
    Why was prohibition such a failure?
  • 2. DAMAGE
    D - Drinking Continued
    A - Available
    M - Made Criminals out of ordinary people
    A - Adverse Effects
    G - Gangsters
    E – End in 1933
  • 3. D – Drinking Continued
    It was impossible to enforce (not enough police - only 4000 agents, many of whom were sacked for taking bribes).
    A - Available
    • the liquor trade just 'went underground'.   speakeasies (illegal bars), moonshine (illegally-made alcohol), bootlegging (smuggling alcohol to sell). There were 200,000 speakeasies in 1933.
  • M – Made criminals out of ordinary people
    People wanted to drink and the drink was available so it meant that many people were breaking the law deliberately.
    A – Adverse Effects
    • Moonshine was poor quality and sometimes sent blind or killed people;
    • 4. 'Jackass brandy' caused internal bleeding;
    • 5. 'Soda Pop Moon' contained poisonous alcohol.
  • G - Gangsters
    The massive profit that could be made by selling alcohol attracted gangsters (organised crime).
    The most famous was Al Capone of Chicago.
    E – End in 1933
    • When FDR was elected he ended prohibition in order to create more jobs in the New Deal.
    • 6. Gradually the crime was brought under control.