Advanced client relationship skills

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Advanced Client Relationship Skills Training Programme Slides

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  • Confidentiality – ask you to agree, and give you our assurance of confidentiality
  • Everything during the two days is towards maximising one or more boxes
  • If there is a process – we better know what it is, maybe even dictate and direct it a bit Controlling and influencing are “Active” you can’t control and influence by being “Passive” It must be a Win-Win situation or outcome
  • What are the fundamental, underlying motivators? Eg. save time, save money, open doors, avoid (expensive) mistakes, make a name for themselves,
  • This is what you’ve seen before… now the advanced stuff
  • Research confirms (Rackham/Huthwaites) that in major/complex sales, Clients are more motivated by the implications of problems
  • Remember Lifeboat!!
  • Remember Lifeboat!!
  • Flip Chart Exercise
  • Develop an introduction – page p54
  • Develop an introduction – page p54
  • What are the problems if you don’t?
  • Remember Lifeboat!!
  • Confidentiality – ask you to agree, and give you our assurance of confidentiality
  • Success only comes from satisfying all 6 aspects (deliberately or accidentally)
  • What industry is the “sales man” in? How could they move up a level?
  • Don’t just say “add value”… say how you will add value!
  • Don’t just say “add value”… say how you will add value!
  • Jon
  • Get them to shout it out
  • Jon
  • What are the fundamental, underlying motivators? Eg. save time, save money, open doors, avoid (expensive) mistakes, make a name for themselves,
  • Research confirms (Rackham/Huthwaites) that in major/complex sales, Clients are more motivated by the implications of problems
  • Aidan
  • Confidentiality – ask you to agree, and give you our assurance of confidentiality
  • Confidentiality – ask you to agree, and give you our assurance of confidentiality
  • Nigel Hunt – p192
  • Nigel Hunt – p192
  • Nigel Hunt – p192
  • Nigel Hunt – p192
  • Shout out exercise or post it potes
  • Develop an introduction – page p54
  • Develop an introduction – page p54
  • Develop an introduction – page p54
  • Develop an introduction – page p54
  • Develop an introduction – page p54
  • Develop an introduction – page p54
  • Nigel Hunt – p192
  • Nigel Hunt – p192
  • Nigel Hunt – p192
  • Remember Lifeboat!!

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Understanding Client Needs & Delivering to Them Presented by Jonathan Nunn & Aidan Dye
  • 3. Our Approach
    • Minimum ‘formal’ lecturing
    • Share with you some of the proven ‘solutions’ to finding and winning new business
    • Draw out the best ideas from the group and share them
    • Help develop and add to these ‘solutions’ using your experience
    • Ensure that the ‘solutions’ are practised in a ‘low risk’ environment
  • 4. Northamptonshire Enterprise Limited
  • 5. Sources
    • Ideas have been drawn from:
    • Latest techniques in ‘consultative’ Relationship Management
    • Leading business sales psychologists
    • Internationally renowned business speakers
    • Business School research
    • and have been successfully applied to many ‘Consultative’ sales situations.
  • 6. Knowledge of UKTI
    • Our experience of working with UKTI includes:
    • Worked with 100+ ITAs and many other UKTI staff
      • Client Relationship Skills
      • Continuous Professional Development Workshops
    • In depth interviews of 300+ UKTI Clients
    • We are UKTI Clients ourselves!
  • 7. ‘ Ground Rules’
    • Freedom to ask questions and discuss differing opinions
    • Be prepared to listen to others, respecting others’ opinions, being open-minded and not judging
    • Not interrupting the sessions by leaving to make calls, email, or do other work.
  • 8. Introduce your colleague
    • Career background
    • Sales Experience
    • Experience in this job
    • Expectations and objectives of this workshop – issues they wish to address
    • Their interests & passions!
  • 9.
    • Aidan Dye
    • 20 Years in Business
    • Commercial Sales Background
    • Relationship management, advisory and sales experience
    • Qualified performance coach
    • Jonathan Nunn
    • Sales & Customer Service - services & finance sectors
    • Sales Manager
    • Training Manager – Finance Co.
    • Own Finance Business
    • 2002 Individual Team Performance
  • 10. Ansoff’s Product Market Matrix Cross Selling New Opportunities Maximising Existing Opportunities Finding New Clients Clients Products Existing New New Present
  • 11. What is selling?
  • 12. Selling in not
    • The art of arresting someone’s intelligence long enough to extract money from them.
  • 13. The Best Sales Man We Ever Had…
    • … was the one who sold two milking machines to a farmer who only had one cow!.......
    • Then this sales man helped finance the deal by taking the cow as a down payment on the two machines!
  • 14. What is selling? Selling is controlling and influencing the whole of the decision making process, persuading the Client to come to a decision in their favour and yours.
  • 15. What is selling? Selling is controlling and influencing the whole of the decision making process , persuading the Client to come to a decision in their favour and yours .
  • 16. UKTI Selling
    • For UKTI in the South West, consider:
    • What types of thing do UKTI sell?
    • What techniques make for good UKTI selling?
    • Generally what makes for bad selling?
  • 17. What Type of Things Do UKTI Sell?
    • Our time (to get in front of people) the Client pays with their time!
    • The whole Passport to Export Programme
    • O.M.I.S.
    • … ..
  • 18. The Wonderful Paradox
    • I have more fun and enjoy more financial success when I stop trying to get what I want and start helping other people get what they want.
    • Kenneth Blanchard
    • The One Minute Sales Person
  • 19. The UKTI Consultative ‘Sale’ is what is Commercially referred to as…
    • A Complex Sales Situation
    • Definition of a Complex Sale includes:
    • High value
    • Big impact
    • Lengthy process
    • Strategic business implications for the Client
    • Number of people involved in the decision
  • 20. Sometimes People Don’t Know What They Need
    • Buyer’s Needs
    • Conscious
    • Unconscious
    • Our job is to understand their conscious needs and bring their unconscious needs to their attention – and then solve both!
  • 21. The Buyer’s Motivation
    • People buy more from fear of loss than from promise of gain
    • Murray Raphel
  • 22. Emotions vs Logic
    • Emotions dominate
    • Desire
    • Fear / Caution
    • Whilst logic is trying to break through
  • 23. People buy with their hearts and as well as their heads Fear, overcome problems, desire, greater health or happiness, make me look good, more money
  • 24. Motivators for Buying UKTI Services
  • 25. Features and Benefits
    • Features
    • Weaknesses
    • Advantages
    • Benefits
    • Implications
  • 26. Using Benefits
    • Ask Questions that bring out your Benefits
    • Not : “We have a list of contacts in your market.”
    • But : “Have you experienced problems getting hold of new people in your market?”
    • “ What would you do on the first morning when you step out of your hotel in China?”
    • “ Would it help you to know exactly who you should be meeting in advance?”
    • Then say : “We able to offer a market research service using local resource in your market – it sounds like that would be extremely valuable to you, wouldn’t it?”
  • 27. Benefit Fluency
    • People don’t buy features
    • They buy what the features do for them
      • i.e. the benefits to them
    • An advantage becomes a benefit only if the Client tells you they need it
    • Otherwise lots of advantages only make you seem unsuitable
    • Weaknesses only have to be less than the weakness of not taking the action!
  • 28. Developing Implications
    • Don’t assume you both know the full extent of the problem
    • “ What are the implications of not solving that problem?”
    • “ Oh dear, what could that mean?”
    • “ And what would that in turn mean?”
    • “ How could that impact - the business/you personally/growth plans/profitability/ financially/ reputation in industry/cash flow/ shareholder value…?”
    • “ What would be the (knock-on) effect of that?”
  • 29. Developing Implications
    • Don’t assume you both know the full extent of the problem
    • “ What are the implications of not solving that problem?”
    • “ Oh dear, what could that mean?”
    • “ And what would that in turn mean?”
    • “ How could that impact - the business/you personally/growth plans/profitability/ financially/ reputation in industry/cash flow/ shareholder value…?”
    • “ What would be the (knock-on) effect of that?”
  • 30. Features
    • Consider:
    • Features
    • Weaknesses
    • Advantages
    • (Benefits)
    • Of:
    • UKTI
    • Passport to Export
    • O.M.I.S.
    • Signing up to UKTI website
  • 31.
    • A Consultative Sales Situation Demands…
      • A skilled approach
      • A thorough fact find
      • A strategy or model
  • 32. A Consultative Selling Approach Knowledge of Problem Knowledge of Solution Low Hi Hi Most people start here Where we want to get to is here Our start point
  • 33.
    • Pr = P + I
    Pr = Problem (needs) P = Pain I = Implications
  • 34. A Consultative Approach Knowledge of Problem Knowledge of Solution Low Hi Hi NO GO AREA Results Area Find out the Pain, do they need advantages Unearth the implications and motivators
  • 35. The Consultative Selling Two Phased Approach Knowledge of Problem Knowledge of Solution Low Hi Hi NO GO AREA Start here Don’t assume you know what the solutions are. Don’t assume you know what the problems are. 1. Consult 2. Resolve
  • 36. The Consultative Selling Two Phased Approach Knowledge of Problem Knowledge of Solution Low Hi Hi NO GO AREA Start here Don’t assume you know what the solutions are. Don’t assume you know what the problems are. Pain & implications Motivators, Advantages or Benefits Solutions Present Benefits 1. Consult 2. Resolve
  • 37. Considering all this our primary focus must be…
    • … on the buyer’s perspective.
    To sell John Brown, What John Brown buys, You’ve got to see things, Through John Brown’s eyes.
  • 38. A Two Phased Approach
    • Provides time needed to build trust
    • Gives you thinking time
    • Draws out facts and underlying motivators
    • Presenting solutions straight away implies their problem was an easy one to solve
    • Builds anticipation of solution
    • Identifies you as a Professional
    • Client moves from ‘tell’ to ‘listen’ mode and is receptive to solutions
    • Ensures Client focus and that you only present solutions to the needs identified
    • Greater Client commitment comes from showing that you have listened to them, understood them, and invested time on their behalf.
  • 39. Successful Selling
    • Start with a completely open mind and explore:
    • The Clients needs (conscious and unconscious)
    • Problems and the implications of those problems
    • Motivators
    • Relevance of Advantages
    • Use a 2 Phased approach to get a full understanding and to give yourself time to develop the ideal solution.
  • 40. The Magic Formulae
    • 1. The best salesperson is the best communicator
    • 2. The best communicator is the best listener
    • 3. The best listener is the best questioner
    • 4. The best questioner is the person who
      • - knows his/her unique product benefits
      • - encourages the client to talk about their problems
      • - causes the client to reflect on the implications of those problems
      • - leads the client to identify the product as the solution to the problems
  • 41. ‘ Game plan’ Game Plan (questions) Implications of NOT resolving the problems: Problems: Benefits: Relevant Feature(s): Product:
  • 42. 3 Approaches to Conducting the Diagnosis
  • 43. Definitions
    • Informal chat:
      • Conversational style with key contact
      • Free-ranging discussion
    • Semiformal discussion:
      • Flagged up in advance
      • More structured approach around the main areas
    • Formal session
      • Purpose and format of meeting clearly set out in advance
      • All key stakeholders invited and encouraged to attend
      • Deliberately consider all question using paper or laptop (or both)
      • Facilitation style
  • 44.  
  • 45. Diagnostic – Client Views
    • Clients get more out of the diagnosis if they are taken through a more formal process
    • At the point at which the relationship is being established the timing it just right for this and there is a real appetite to do it
    • Evidence is that a strong diagnosis increases the Clients perception of the Adviser, their commitment to the Action Plan and the value the customer places on the support they receive
  • 46.
    • “ I’m big enough and ugly enough to do this export thing on my own. Why should I come to UKTI?!?”
  • 47. Our Unique Selling Points With UKTI On their own or with ‘a competitor’ Shared
  • 48. What is your greatest USP?
    • YOU!!
  • 49. Developing USP’s
    • What ‘shared’ USP’s can you move to your unique USP’s?
    • What Unique Service (and Product) Problems do your competitors have that you don’t? These are also USP’s for you.
  • 50. Structure of Sales meeting
    • “ You recently met Mr Perkins from Feltons Plc (a Medium Business on your patch) at a Chamber event. He says he is keen to learn about exporting. You have arranged to go to see him on Friday.
    • What are the key stages to and purposes of them for this meeting?”
  • 51. Structure of Sales Meeting
    • Preparation
    • Meeting objective setting
    • Introduction of ourselves and what we can do for Client
    • Question Client problems / issues
    • Implications of problems
    • Summarise and float some solutions
    • War Stories / Promise
    • Propose Next Step
  • 52. Preparation
    • Thoughts to consider when preparing:
    • Research
      • Market, products, person, etc
    • Objectives
      • Satisfactory Advances
      • Referrals?
    • Develop your sales gameplan
    • Prepare questions
    • Rehearse positive and negative outcomes/objections
  • 53. Setting Meeting Objectives
    • Always set clear objectives in advance of appointments
    • Successful meeting objectives must include some form of action/commitment on the part of the client
  • 54. Continuations and Advances
    • There are 4 outcomes to a “sales” appointment:
    • Agreement to Proceed – Client “signs up” to a service
    • Advance – something specifically happens to move nearer to a sale
    • Continuation – Client makes “nice noises”
    • No Sale – actively denied your principle call objective
  • 55. Continuations & Advances
    • A Continuation
      • The discussions continue towards a ‘ possible’ positive outcome
    • An Advance
      • A clear step has been taken nearer to a sale
  • 56. Introducing UKTI
    • What is the purpose of the introduction?
    • Gaining the Client’s Confidence – who you are and why you are there
    • Must be Client Focused – relevant to them
    • Sets direction for the meeting
    • Encourage them to share information and problems
    • Keep it short!
  • 57. Introducing UKTI
    • What is the purpose of the introduction?
    • Prime for ‘the journey’
    • Condition that there will be some services they will want to consider paying for
      • Further repeating the conditioning message works even better
    • Any other ‘strategic message’ you wish to convey.
  • 58. Structure of Initial Sales Meeting
    • Preparation
    • Meeting objective setting
    • Introduction of ourselves and what we can do for Client
    • Find out some facts – collect any ‘data for later’
    • Question Client problems / issues
    • Implications of problems
    • Summarise and float some solutions
    • War Stories / Promise
    • Managing expectations
    • Propose Next Step
  • 59. Structure of Initial Sales Meeting
    • Preparation
    • Meeting objective setting
    • Introduction of ourselves and what we can do for Client
    • Find out some facts – collect any ‘data for later’
    • Question Client problems / issues
    • Implications of problems
    • Summarise and float some solutions
    • War Stories / Promise
    • Managing expectations
    • Propose Next Step
  • 60. Structure of Initial Sales Meeting
    • Preparation
    • Meeting objective setting
    • Introduction of ourselves and what we can do for Client
    • Find out some facts – collect any ‘data for later’
    • Question Client problems / issues
    • Implications of problems
    • Summarise and float some solutions
    • War Stories / Promise
    • Managing expectations
    • Propose Next Step
  • 61. Summarising Present back and confirm the Client’s key concerns, problems, implications, requirements: “ You said….is that right?” “ Have I correctly understood that this is the problem that you would like to address?” “ Is there anything else I should know?” Conditional agreement: “If we could help you overcome this problem, would you be interested?”
  • 62. ‘Float’ Some Solutions
    • Outline very broadly possible solutions
    • Keep this hypothetical but link it back to their problems and implications
    • Seek a commitment from the customer:
    • “ If we are able to…would that solve part of the problem?”
    • “ If we can do this….would that be of value to you?”
  • 63. Promise & War Stories
    • Don’t propose your solution (yet).
    • Thank them for all the information and time.
    • Tell them you need to think about possible solutions.
    • Promise you can help them, giving them a reason to see you again.
    • Share some War Stories of how businesses did not use UKTI and it really went wrong (in the ways they are worried about)
    • “ Good news, I came just for a discussion and actually I think there are a number of things we might be able to do to really help you.”
  • 64. Use Positive Language
    • Telling them what you can’t do
      • Tell them what you can do
    • Possibly, maybe, perhaps
      • I am sure that will do the job
    • We might be able to do this
      • I’m certain we can get something for you
    • I hope that will be OK
      • I’m confident you’ll be pleased with this
    • If you decide to go on Passport…
      • Once you are on Passport …
  • 65. Managing Expectations
    • Don’t over promise
    • Make them feel the pain and the implications
    • Make them appreciate that the alternative is worse – the implications or no action
    • Be realistic about the downsides
  • 66. Propose Next Steps
    • Thank them – tell them how valuable the meeting has been
    • Tell them what you are going to do
    • Make the next appointment, there and then before you leave!!
  • 67. Consultative Approach Knowledge of Problem Knowledge of Solution Low Hi Hi NO GO AREA Start here Don’t assume you know what the solutions are. Don’t assume you know what the problems are. Situation, problems, implications Solutions Gameplan and effective communication 1. Consult 2. Resolve Preparation & meeting objectives Inspiring Introduction Float Solutions, Promise, War Stories & Next App.
  • 68.  
  • 69. Objections
    • An objection upfront is usually “an expression of fear” – emotional not logical.
    • Acknowledge it
    • Tell them you’ll come back to it
    • Make a note
    • Carry on with your meeting structure and gameplan
  • 70. Objections
    • Dealing with an objection later:
    • Listen
    • Explore it
    • Summarise/confirm
    • Use “Feel, felt, found”
  • 71. Objections
    • Dealing with “I don’t have much time, what do you have to tell me?”
    • Introduction then ask questions
  • 72. Objections
    • Dealing with “That doesn’t apply to us”
    • You are telling not asking
  • 73. Negotiation ‘Trading’
    • Preferential terms must be earned
    • Don’t give away terms immediately
      • Avoid ‘giving away’ commitment to improved terms during the discussion
      • Revisit all terms in conclusion
    • “ if you… then I…”
  • 74. Negotiation Trading
    • What are the things we can ‘trade’?
  • 75. Action Planning
  • 76. Review of Objectives
  • 77. Close
  • 78. You can’t tell us anything?
    • “ I think there’s a world market for maybe five computers”
    • Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, 1943
    • “ Airplanes are interesting toys but of no military value”
    • Marechal Ferdinand Foch, Professor of Strategy, Ecole Superieure de Guerre
    • “ Everything that can be invented has been invented”
    • Charles H Duell, Commissioner, US Office of Patents, 1899
  • 79. And more
    • “ Who the hell wants to hear actors talk?”
    • H.M. Warner, Warner Bros, 1927
    • “ Heavier-than-air-flying machines are impossible”
    • Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895
    • “ 640k ought to be enough memory for anybody”
    • Bill Gates – Microsoft – 1981
    • What similar statements might we be making?
  • 80.  
  • 81. Maximising Client Relationships Presented by Jonathan Nunn & Aidan Dye
  • 82. Northamptonshire Enterprise Limited
  • 83. Sources
    • Ideas have been drawn from:
    • Latest techniques in ‘consultative’ Relationship Management
    • Leading business sales psychologists
    • Internationally renowned business speakers
    • Business School research
    • and have been successfully applied to many ‘Consultative’ sales situations.
  • 84. Knowledge of UKTI
    • Our experience of working with UKTI includes:
    • Worked with 100+ ITAs and many other UKTI staff
      • Client Relationship Skills
      • Continuous Professional Development Workshops
    • In depth interviews of 300+ UKTI Clients
    • We are UKTI Clients ourselves!
  • 85. ‘ Ground Rules’
    • Freedom to ask questions and discuss differing opinions
    • Be prepared to listen to others, respecting others’ opinions, being open-minded and not judging
    • Not interrupting the sessions by leaving to make calls, email, or do other work.
  • 86. Introductions & Objectives
    • Challenges in managing Client relationships – therefore issues they wish to address
    • Your Expectations and objectives of this workshop
  • 87.
    • Aidan Dye
    • 20 Years in Business
    • Commercial Sales Background
    • Relationship management, advisory and sales experience
    • Qualified performance coach
    • Jonathan Nunn
    • Sales & Customer Service - services & finance sectors
    • Sales Manager
    • Training Manager – Finance Co.
    • Own Finance Business
    • 2002 Individual Team Performance
  • 88. Denis Ryan Abbey Life / Barclays Assurance
    • The relationship is a fundamental building block
    • Relationship must have a purpose
    • Strength measured not by friendship, but by the value you add to the Client, and the value that they add to you
    • ‘ Selling’ somebody something and then just maintaining it is not a satisfactory business relationship
    Definition of Managing a Relationship
  • 89. ________ __________ __________ _______ __________
  • 90. Components of the sale
    • ‘ S ’ selling
    • ‘ s’ selling
    • Product
    • Financial
    • Motivation
  • 91. Financial Personality Conditions Product Motivation
  • 92. P M F Type of Product Our Product Emotional Logical Cost Price Financial rationale & justification Payments Budget Condition - fact ‘ afford it’ Total sale £ Value for money Objection – opinion ‘ worth it’ Confidence, desire, fear Features Benefits Support Differentiators Needs and wants for Such a service (Conscious & unconscious)
  • 93. PMF – which is missing?
    • Your Client says that he/she…
    • Sees the value in research, but is unsure as to whether this is best done by the Embassy in the target market.
    • Loves the idea of joining the mission, but is yet to convince the M.D.
    • Is unsure about spending some of the remaining exhibition budget on targeted invitations to their stand, at £1800
  • 94. Key Account Management
  • 95. The Customer Perception Ladder
    • How do patients regard their G.P.?
    • Do they think he/she is:
    • Level 4 – “We have worked together on a programme that has had a significant impact on my long term health”
    • Level 3- “Lots of useful and relevant advice”
    • Level 2 – “Useful leaflets containing stuff I probably know, but must read one day”
    • Level 1 – “Renewer of prescriptions”
  • 96. The Customer Perception Ladder
    • What level are you at with your Clients?
    • Do they think you are a:
    • Level 4 – Business Partner
    • Level 3- Provides some useful advice
    • Level 2 – Bringer of leaflets
    • Level 1 – Bringer of Grants
  • 97. The Customer Perception Ladder
    • Customer comments:
    • Level 4 – “Has made a vital contribution to us achieving a key business objective”
    • Level 3- “Helpful, pointed us in the right direction”
    • Level 2 – “I needed to lie down in a darkened room afterwards”
    • Level 1 – “Not much money and lots of red tape”
  • 98. Moving Up The Customer Perception Ladder
    • To Level 2 - sell the benefits of what UKTI’s products and services can do for them
    • To Level 3 – set out what you can do to help your Clients achieve their business objectives
    • To Level 4 – Follow the Relationship Approach:
    • Understand the Client’s Motivation, their problems, and the implications of these problems
    • Use a Consultative Approach
    • Develop strong relationships with all key decision makers
    • Make recommendations of ‘solutions’
  • 99. Client Account Plans
  • 100. Client Account Plans
    • What goes into an Account Plan?
    • ‘ Pain’
    • Implications
    • Position on Key Account Ladder
    • What potentially will they buy?
      • (when? value?)
    • Longer term strategy & opportunities
    • Objectives for next meeting/actions
  • 101.  
  • 102. Account Plans – 7 Tips from the Best!
    • The best Account Managers :
    • Are very specific about what they are actually going to do
    • Know that their ‘Level’ is directly related to their knowledge of the pain, implications, needs, Client’s export progress, etc.
    • With Implications, they keep asking “so what?”
    • Always consider ‘Tell & sell’
  • 103. The More Purchase Points the Better
  • 104. Account Plans – 7 Tips from the Best!
    • The best Account Managers :
    • Are very specific about what they are actually going to do
    • Know that their ‘Level’ is directly related to their knowledge of the pain, implications, needs, Client’s export progress, etc.
    • With Implications, they keep asking “so what?”
    • Always consider ‘Tell & sell’
    • Think pro-active selling (Big ‘ S ’)
    • Link objectives to gaps in ‘sold log’
    • Review them before each Client meeting
  • 105. It is not necessary to write down my relationship goals.
  • 106. RAS – Filter System
    • Reticular Activating System
    • It can be limiting
    • It can be highly supportive
  • 107. Developing the Client Export Action Plan
  • 108. What Makes for a Good Client Export Action Plan?
  • 109. Action Planning
    • Client Comments:
    • “ You have to have a plan to go into something like exporting or you would be barking mad!”
    • “ You need to think it through and have something to aim for.”
    • “ Very useful it showed how naïve and lacking in knowledge we were”
    • “ Helps concentration and focus”
    • “ It encouraged me to think about export in a structured way”
  • 110. ITP Export Action Plan
    • “ ITP will grow their business in Portugal.
    • In order to do this they will:
    • Sign up to the UKTI website
    • Commission an OMIS
    • Visit the market
    • Do some export business!
    • Think about more markets.
    • Quickly!
  • 111. What Makes for a Good Client Action Plan
    • Developed jointly
    • Routed in and linked to Clients business goals
    • SMART objectives
  • 112. SMART Objectives S pecific M easurable A chievable R elevant T ime-bound SMART A R S E A greed R esources S tretching E valuated
  • 113. What Makes for a Good Client Action Plan
    • Developed jointly
    • Routed in and linked to Clients business goals
    • SMARTARSE objectives
    • Flexibility
    • Anchored around important milestones
    • Reviewed regularly (and traffic lighted)
    • Not overly ambitious
    • Consider the risks and what might go wrong.
    • There is no evidence to suggest that the more elaborate and detailed the plan, the better the results.
  • 114. “ Professionalism”
    • What do we mean by ‘professionalism’?
  • 115. Client Feedback on ‘Professionalism’
    • Listening skills
      • Ask more questions
      • Talk a little less!
      • A genuine desire to understand
    • A positive ‘can do’ attitude
    • “ Finding out our needs and matching UKTI offerings to those needs”
    • Focused on solutions relevant to us
    • A focused approach to delivering support:
      • Well prepared for meetings
      • Clear purpose for each meeting
      • “ Reminds us of our bigger goal and positions activities in that context”
    • Gives clear explanations and is able to draw on comparisons and anecdotes to help us understand
    • “ Worked hard to understand our business and its issues before making suggestions on the way forward”
    Source: UKTI Client Perception Study
  • 116. The Secrets to Success Personal Skills Social Skills Self Awareness Self Control Motivation Empathy Social Skills
  • 117. Communication Skills
  • 118. Three short tests!
  • 119.  
  • 120. Effective Communication ‘ I know you believe you understand what you think I said - but I’m not so sure you realise that what you heard is not what I meant!’
  • 121. The Communication Code Words Tone Body Language 12% 28% 60% ------- 100%
  • 122. Negative Body Language
    • Touching throat frequently
    • Plucking at clothes/fidgeting
    • Twisted legs - defensive
    • Talking too quickly
    • Nervous giggling
    • Poor eye contact
    • Wringing hands
    • Crossed arms
    • Sitting bolt upright
  • 123. Positive Body Language
    • Steady eye contact
    • Smiling not giggling
    • Steady response to
    • Questions
    • Comfortable with
    • Silence
    • Using hand gestures
    • Relaxed posture
  • 124.
    • Questioning & Listening
  • 125. Questioning
    • Closed
    • Leading
    • Open
  • 126. Open Questions
    • What?
    • Where?
    • When?
    • Why?
    • Who?
    • How?
  • 127. % Listen Ratios Success Talk time (%) Hi Low Hi
  • 128. You are not listening when:
    • You say you understand before I have finished talking.
    • You present an answer to my problem before I finish speaking.
    • You finish my sentences for me.
    • You find me boring and tell me, especially by body language.
    • You are dying to tell me something.
    • You tell me about your experience, making mine seem unimportant.
    • If you do anything other than give me 100% attention
  • 129. You are listening to me when:
    • You really try to understand, even when I’m not making much sense.
    • You grasp my point of view, even when it is against your sincere convictions.
    • You allow me to make my own judgement, even when you think I may be wrong
    • You hold back your desire to give me good advice early in our discussions
    • You give me enough room to allow me to work out for myself what is going on.
    • You give me 100% of your attention
  • 130. Behaviours of Successful Communicators
    • Behaviours avoided:
    • Gap searching
    • Irritators
    • Counter proposals
    • Defend attack spiral
    • Argument dilution
  • 131. Argument Dilution
  • 132. Behaviours of Successful Communicators
    • Behaviours used:
    • Funnelling
    • Encouragers
    • Labelling
    • Testing understanding, summarising & seeking information
    • Feelings commentary
  • 133. 8 Tips for Relationship Meetings
  • 134. At Every Subsequent Meeting 2. Reheat the Pie 1. Start by asking “Has anything changed?” 2. Reheat the P.I.
  • 135. 3. Presenting Solutions
    • Remind the Client of their commitment:
    • “ I think we said before if we were able to solve that, that would be of value to you, right?”
    • Outline your solution:
      • Have something in writing
      • Take them through it
  • 136. 4. Talking Prices
    • Price condition – when talking generally use the bigger figures
    • Talk passed the price:
      • i.e. “…the total cost of everything is £3,500 which will ensure you have information on the key buyers, and that they all get a personal invitation to the launch at the Embassy”
    • Beware of the psychology of a pricing range:
      • £500 - £2,000
      • You hear £2,000
      • The Client Hears £500!
  • 137. 5. How Does that Actually Work?
    • Keep it simple and avoid jargon!
    • A picture paints a thousand words (prepare something and leave it with them)
    • Make it client focused:
      • “ We’ve identified that you are very busy, don’t want to waste time and money and are uncertain about the best approach to get into China. OMIS will help you with all these, because it will provide the best information available on the key people…..”
    • Make it sound as simple as possible – don’t boast about the difficulties you may have to tackle in providing this service.
  • 138. 6. Desire vs Cost Time Low Hi Desire Cost
  • 139. Desire vs Cost Options
    • There are two options to increase desire and reduce cost. Either:
    • Make it sound so fantastic! (i.e. over promise)
    • Help them to understand why they really need it (Pain)
    • The 2 phased approach naturally extends the time, thereby increasing the desire and reducing the cost
  • 140. 7. The Close
    • Agree the actions:
    • Ask for the ‘sale’
    • Commitment to the next meeting/presentation, including:
      • Fix the date, time and location
      • Clearly agree the purpose
      • Arrange attendance of all the influencers and decision makers
    • Prepare Client for the advice of others, and remorse
  • 141. 8. “Drive the Sales Process”
    • Remember …
    • Always set clear objectives in advance of appointments
    • Remind them of the ‘pain’ and review actions from the previous meeting at the start of each meeting
    • Avoid leaving a client appointment without arranging the next meeting (advance)
    • Avoid posting or emailing documents that are important to you and that require client commitment or action
  • 142. 8 Tips for Relationship Meetings
    • Has anything changed?
    • Reheat the PI
    • Presenting Solutions
    • Talking Prices
    • How Does That Actually Work?
    • Desire Vs Cost
    • Conclusion / Close
    • Drive the Process
  • 143.  
  • 144.
    • E = U + SU
  • 145. The ECHO Principles
    • E mpathy
    • C ommon ground
    • H umanity
    • O bjective
  • 146. Components of Gravitas Impact Influence Direction Appearance Experience Substance Inspiration Energy Follow Through Ownership Is It Right?
  • 147. Components of Gravitas
  • 148. Components of Gravitas Impact Influence Direction Appearance Experience Substance Inspiration Energy Follow Through Ownership Is It Right?
  • 149. Action Planning
  • 150. Review of Objectives
  • 151. Close
  • 152.  
  • 153. Our 3 Ego States Parent Adult Child P A C Critical Supportive Rebellious child Adapted Free Logical, analytical, unemotional
  • 154. Normal Transaction P A C P A C “ Good morning” “ Good morning”
  • 155. Normal Transaction P A C P A C “ It’s 11.40” “ What’s the time?”
  • 156. Normal Transaction P A C P A C “ Oh, I know it’s just terrible the way some people behave” “ Drivers like that should not be allowed on the road!”
  • 157. Normal Transaction P A C P A C “ Yes, then we can live in it” “ Let’s build an enormous sand castle”
  • 158. Normal Transaction P A C P A C “ Late again!” “ Sorry. I’ll try not to do it again.”
  • 159. Crossed Transaction P A C P A C “ Is it??” “ Good morning”
  • 160. Crossed Transaction P A C P A C “ Time you got a watch!!” “ What’s the time?”
  • 161. Crossed Transaction P A C P A C “ Drivers like that should not be allowed on the road!” “ We are all entitled to our own space. It is an aspect of our society”
  • 162.  
  • 163. Finding More Quality Clients Presented by Jonathan Nunn & Aidan Dye.
  • 164. Training Philosophy / Style
    • Relevant
    • Simple
    • Practical
    • Transferable
    • and Fun!
  • 165. Introduce your colleague
    • Background and relevant experience
    • Expectations and objectives of this workshop – issues they wish to address
    • Challenges experienced in finding new Clients
  • 166. Challenges In Finding Clients
    • Finding enough quality Clients
    • Maintaining constant activity
    • Relying on others for introduction
    • Low profile of UKTI
    • Client expectations and preconceptions
    • Low referral numbers from Introducers
    • Geography
  • 167.
    • Aidan Dye
    • 20 Years in Business
    • Commercial Sales Background
    • Relationship management, advisory and sales experience
    • Qualified performance coach
    • Jonathan Nunn
    • Sales & Customer Service - services & finance sectors
    • Sales Manager
    • Training Manager – Finance Co.
    • Own Finance Business
    • 2002 Individual Team Performance
  • 168. Northamptonshire Enterprise Limited
  • 169. Sources
    • Ideas have been drawn from:
    • Latest techniques in ‘consultative’ Relationship Management
    • Leading business sales psychologists
    • Internationally renowned business speakers
    • Business School research
    • and have been successfully applied to many ‘Consultative’ sales situations.
  • 170. ‘ Ground Rules’
    • Freedom to ask questions and discuss differing opinions
    • Be prepared to listen to others, respecting others’ opinions, being open-minded and not judging
    • Not interrupting the sessions by leaving to make calls, email, or do other work.
  • 171. How will we survive?
    • Man the Lifeboats!
  • 172. Who will you rescue?
    • Digby Jones
    • Clive & Rory (counts as one)
    • Russell Jones
    • Andrew Cahn
    • Patrick Robinson
    • Danny Lopez
    • Bob Collier
  • 173. Who will you rescue?
    • A Prostitute
    • A Mother and Child (counts as one)
    • Liners 1 st Officer
    • 16 year old boy
    • 86 year old woman
    • 80 yr old survivor of Nazi concentration camp
    • A Nurse
  • 174. Our Belief System
    • The question is, are they
    • ‘ Beliefs’ or,
    • ‘ Truths’?
    • Are they
    • Conscious or Unconscious?
  • 175. Assumptions
    • What assumptions do you make?
      • About your customers?
    • What assumptions are they making about you?
  • 176. Our Belief System
    • We often make judgements based on beliefs not truths
    • Don’t make assumptions
    • Keep an open mind
    • Our mind fills gaps with beliefs, even when offered facts!
    • To get the facts ask questions
  • 177. Being More Successful
    • Increase the number of times you recommend products and services in your key target areas and the value of them
    • Increase the number and quality of the meetings you have
    • Identify and convert more prospects
  • 178. To Get Better Results:
    • Ask Des!
    • Direction
    • Effort
    • Skills
  • 179. Ask Des!
    • Direction
      • Who?
      • Which businesses?
      • Sectors?
      • Business size?
      • Which contacts?
  • 180. Ask Des!
    • Effort
      • How Many?
      • Appointment numbers?
      • Activity levels
  • 181. Ask Des!
    • Skills
      • Knowledge of Products and services?
      • Ability to Unearth Client issues
      • Standards of Presentation
      • ‘ Selling skills’
  • 182. Client Feedback on Finding More Clients
  • 183. How Might UKTI Be More Proactive In Identifying Potential Clients?
    • “ Use the leads on the website and proactively contact customers who supply those products”
    • “ Show dynamism and the personal side in promoting UKTI”
    • “ Not email, but ‘phone or written correspondence that grabs your attention.”
    • “ Get to more networking events”
    • “ Do the chamber, local councils, CBI, banks, local clusters, IOD, accountants and other agencies (EEF, FDA, Prince’s Trust) know you exist? They know all the local businesses”
    • “ Write / ‘phone / email businesses; Neither Business Link or Manufacturers Advisory Service recommended UKTI.”
    • “ Approach people at exhibitions”
    Source: UKTI Client Perception Studies
  • 184. How Might UKTI Be More Proactive In Identifying Potential Clients?
    • “ You are not an easy department to find unless you know someone who points you in the right direction – wish you’d contacted us earlier!”
    • “ Proactively approach businesses”
    • “ Canvassing ‘phone calls”
    • “ Get referrals from passed Clients”
    • “ Make more of referrals – we have recommended three other businesses to UKTI.”
    Source: UKTI Client Perception Studies
  • 185. Would You Recommend UKTI?
    • “ Yes I have. Anyone entering into export without this is missing out.”
    • Of the Clients surveyed, 99% have said that they would recommend UKTI to other businesses.
    • They often then go on to say:
    • “… and I have been meaning to get around to that!”
    Source: UKTI Client Perception Studies
  • 186. Would You Use UKTI Again For Something Else?
    • “ Yes, for support and encouragement.”
    • “ Yes. What else do you do?”
    • 97% of Clients would use UKTI for additional support where they re-approached - enormous potential for further cross-selling.
    Source: UKTI Client Perception Studies
  • 187. Picking Winners
  • 188. Picking Winners! - What Do They Look Like?
    • What are some of the aspects common across the ‘profiles’ of our best Client successes ?
  • 189. Customer Profile Analysis – Identifying Target Customers Why Do They Use Them? (i.e. why do new Customers want to hear from me?) Which Of UKTI Services Do They Use? Who Are Our Best Contacts? (Role/Position) Who are Our Best Customers? (Companies) Markets/Customers Where We’ve Had Some Success & There Is More Potential
  • 190. Lead Sources
    • Where can you get leads from?
    • Previous O.M.I.S. & Passport Clients
    • In house – Client files
    • Newspapers / journals
    • Client referrals
    • Trade associations
    • Exhibitions
    • Mapping an area – driving research in a territory
  • 191. Approaching Potential Clients
  • 192. Networking & Exhibitions
  • 193. Networking & Exhibitions
    • Structure of the discussion
    • The average encounter lasts 30 seconds to 5 minutes.
    • Establish rapport quickly
    • Question Client problems / issues
    • Qualify the person’s need
    • Make good notes & take a card
    • Float some solutions
    • War stories / promise
    • Agree next action steps
    • Disengage politely and move on
  • 194. The Do’s And Don’ts of Networking & Exhibitions
    • Do’s
    • Be confident
    • Adopt the attitude ‘we are eager to do business’
    • Ensure everyone understands objectives for the event (awareness/inform? Leads/ITA meetings?)
    • Have a good system for recording contacts, discussions, and actions
    • Have a really good answer ready for “so what do you do”
    • Follow up all contacts rigorously after the event
  • 195. The Do’s And Don’ts of Networking & Exhibitions
    • Don’ts
    • Party too much!
    • Dress ostentatiously
    • Tell the ‘UKTI story’
    • Spend too much time with people who will not help you to achieve your objectives
    • Get too far into ‘sell’ mode
    • Let your body language say the wrong thing about you
  • 196. Introducing UKTI
    • You meet a prospect on your patch; a medium sized business you know is not exporting.
    • What do you say about UKTI and yourself?
    • What is purpose of this introduction?
  • 197. Exercise “Introducing UKTI”
    • Develop an Introduction that you can use with prospective clients
  • 198. The ‘Elevator Speech’?
    • What is the purpose of this brief introduction to UKTI?
    • Gains the Client’s Confidence – who you are and why you are there
    • Sets direction for the discussion
    • Encourages them to share information and problems
    • Must be Client Focused – relevant to them
    • Keep it short!
  • 199. 7 Rules for a Powerful Introduction
    • The sole purpose of this introduction is to get you in front of the prospect. Therefore:
    • Keep it brief
    • Resist ‘telling your story’
    • Tell ‘em quickly ‘what’s in it for them’
    • Keep your market broad
    • Solve a deep need
    • Use a testimonial approach, in the third person
      • “ Customers say they like…”
      • Avoid ‘I am’ or ‘we are’
    • Raise curiosity (use numbers)
  • 200. “ Clients tell us they love dealing with UKTI because we understand the 3 ingredients that help boost their international sales.” (Ways to get to market, ways to save time and ways to save money)
  • 201. What Questions Could You Ask that Would Get the Relationship Going?
  • 202. Exhibitions
    • Which of these are good opening remarks?
    • “ Can I help you?”
    • “ How are you today?”
    • Read their badge
    • “ How do you like the exhibition so far?”
    • “ To what extent are you exporting in your business?”
  • 203. Exhibitions
    • Opening remarks
    • “ Can I help you?” – we all usually say “no thanks / just looking”!
    • “ How are you today?” – cheesy, they’ve been asked that 100 times already today! (and might be having a bad day!)
    • Read their badge and say something positive about the company “I was hoping you might visit our stand”
    • “ How do you like the exhibition so far?” – gets them talking in a non confrontational way
    • “ To what extent are you exporting in your business?” – leading question
  • 204. Working With Introducers
  • 205. Closing the Introducer Meeting
    • There are three points to include:
    • Agreeing targets – how many leads do you anticipate being able to send us in the next month?
    • Establish Service Levels and expectations
    • Agreeing a date for the next meeting to review leads received, give them a cheque, feedback
  • 206. Closing the Introducer Meeting
    • Set it up so that:
    • The Introducer gives you the prospect number to call rather than the other way around
    • Knows what information you require and what he can deliver
    • Knows what to say to the Client about you
  • 207. Telephone Appointment Calling
  • 208. Some DO’s of Appointment Calling
    • Keep it short
    • Focus on getting the appointment
    • Keep your market broad
    • Use a testimonial approach:
      • “ Customers say they like…”
      • Avoid ‘I am’ or ‘we are’
    • Raise curiosity (use numbers)
    • Have a list of people to call. Lists improve productivity.
  • 209. Some DON’Ts of Appointment Calling
    • Tell the UKTI History
    • Try to sign them up on the phone
    • Over qualify them
    • Give them all the answers! In other words say: “that’s one of the things we need to discuss when we meet”
    • Chat on further or over sell it, once the appointment has been made
  • 210. Cold Calling Template
    • Mr Smith, thank you
    • Introduction (add reference if available)
    • Clients are good enough to tell us we help them to… increase their profitability and international sales
    • Welcome the opportunity to meet with you to... see how this might apply to your business
    • Might I suggest some dates… what is your availability for Wednesday or some day next week?
    • Objections…that’s great.
  • 211. Getting Passed the Gatekeeper
    • Use their name, sell the benefits, make them feel special
    • Work outside of the gatekeeper’s hours - they very rarely start before 9am or work after 5pm
    • Don’t just leave a message, say “I will keep trying you as well”
  • 212. Getting Passed the ‘Gatekeeper’ You are unsure of your rights and your request may be questioned “ Please may I speak to Mr. Dye?” Your relationship is more distant and your request may be questioned “ Mr. Dye, please.” You are on first name terms and expect to be put through “ Aidan Dye please.” What it sounds like: What you say: When you know the persons name:
  • 213. Cold Calling
    • Remember…
        • SW
        • SW
        • SW
        • SW
        • N
  • 214. Cold Calling
    • Remember…
        • Some Will
        • Some Won’t
        • So What?
        • Shan’t Worry
        • NEXT!!
  • 215.  
  • 216. Weekly Activity Plan Week Commencing…………………….. Prospecting Prospecting Prospecting Prospecting Prospecting Friday Thursday Wednesday Tuesday Monday After Tea After Lunch After Coffee When I get in
  • 217. Why Prospects Never Call You Back
  • 218. Leaving Voicemail Messages
    • Don’t just leave a message, say “I will keep trying you as well”
    • Avoid leaving your name & number for a call back:
      • They rarely do call back
      • They prejudice the reason for the call
      • If they do call back, you’re unprepared
      • If you do leave a message, give it a compelling reason for them to return call, & to remind you of why you were calling them
  • 219.  
  • 220. Action Planning
  • 221.  
  • 222. 3 Powerful Ways to Increase your Business
  • 223.
    • “ Frog Kissing” 2. “Blitz Days” 3. “Wolf Pack” Hunting
  • 224. 1. “Frog Kissing”
    • Objective : Fill the diary with new business
    • Approach : Proactive Calling by all ITAs From ‘the Office’
    • On the Day : Start with a few techniques and some motivation
    • Review:
      • Newspapers
      • Trade Journals
      • Association Directories
      • Yellow Pages, etc
    • Identify potential prospects
    • Call for an appointment
    • Monitor : ‘Calls / Speaks / Appointments’
    • Subsequently Monitor : Outcome of Appointments
  • 225. 2. ‘Blitz Days’
    • Objective : Generate a pipeline of product sales
    • Approach : Marketing & Proactive Calling
    • In Advance : Decide on underperforming product
    • Identify existing and potential Clients who might be interested
    • Send out short marketing letter in advance to raise awareness and interest
    • On the Day : Start with a review of product knowledge, benefits and ‘Client Problems’
    • Call, following the letter for an appointment
    • Monitor : ‘Calls / Speaks / Appointments’
    • Subsequently Monitor : Sales Successes.
  • 226. 3. ‘Wolf Pack’ Hunting
    • Objective : Support Underperforming Individual or Team
    • Approach : Team Effort to Hunt for Business
    • In Advance : Individual or Team agrees they need help
    • In Advance : Team buy-in to working together on it
    • Identify a dense area of business (such as industrial estate or group of office blocks)
    • Ensure lots of business cards available
    • On the Day : Meet for Briefing & Motivational Breakfast near chosen source of business
    • Team splits up the territory and (best in pairs) visits every business to see if they:
      • Export already
      • Considering exporting
      • Know about UKTI, your Services and others who might be interested
    • Book appointments
    • Meet for lunch in nearby pub to celebrate, review successes and allocate out leads
    • Monitor : ‘Calls / Speaks / Interests / Appointments’
    • Subsequently Monitor : ‘Interested ones’ and Appointments.
  • 227. Know Your Targets
  • 228. Know Your Targets
    • Set yourself goals and targets. They:
    • Give focus to your work
    • Motivate to succeed
    • Enable you to measure progress
    • Work to your personal averages:
    • Give you a yardstick to work by
    • Motivate you when times are hard
    • Show where improvements might be needed (Direction, effort, skill)
  • 229. Know Your Targets
    • Income Targets:
    • What is my annual target?
    • What is my daily income target?
    • What is the average sale value?
    • How many sales do I have to make a day? (A)
    • How many Businesses do you need to talk to to make a sale? (B)
    • How many Businesses do I need to be talking to a day? (A x B)
    • The key is to focus on daily activity.
  • 230. Know Your Targets
    • Sign Ups Targets:
    • What is my annual recruitment target? (A)
    • How many businesses do I need to meet face to face to get a sign up? (B)
    • How many prospects do I need meet or cold call to get an appointment? (C)
    • How many prospects or cold calls do I need to talk to a day? (A x B x C / 220)
    • Remember to record your daily activity.
  • 231. Make Time For Your Work
  • 232. The Priority Matrix B A C high low high low importance urgency
  • 233. The Priority Matrix Strategic Crisis Development Critical Ditch Distractions DND Reactive high low high low importance urgency
  • 234. The Priority Matrix Strategic Crisis Development Critical Ditch Distractions DND Reactive high low high low importance urgency 20% 80%
  • 235. Managing Interruptions
    • Necessary? (fire alarm!)
    • Necessary but untimely?
    • Unnecessary?
    • How long will it take? Do you really mean two minutes?
    • Anything else? (get to the point!)
    • Establish A,B,C, priority
    • “ I’m right in the middle of something…can I get back to you at… o’clock?
    • Do not react to every demand on your time
  • 236. Managing Interruptions
    • Stand up when people interrupt
    • Move chairs, even remove them or make them inaccessible
    • Use a meeting room to remove yourself from intrusion
    • Develop a system of non-interruption time with colleagues
    • An open door policy is not always best!
  • 237. Managing Your Time
    • Group similar activities together
    • Block out your time - Important things in first
      • Prospecting time
      • Researching the prospect
      • ‘ phoning
      • Allocate targets to your ‘phone time
    • Should you ring in the morning? In the afternoon?... Just ring!!
    • Prepare a list:
      • It removes “who do I call next?”
      • Easier to monitor progress
      • Research shows up to 3 times as many calls when sales people us a list
  • 238. Float Some Solutions
    • Outline very broadly possible solutions, keep this hypothetical but linking it back to the Client’s problems and implications, and seek a commitment from the customer:
    • “ If we are able to…would that solve part of the problem?”
    • “ If we can do this….would that be of value to you?”
  • 239. Promise & War Stories
    • Don’t propose your detailed solution (yet).
    • Thank them for all the information and time.
    • Tell them you need to think about possible final solutions.
    • Promise you can help them and give them a reason to look forward to next discussion / meeting.
    • Share some ‘War Stories’ of how businesses did not use UKTI and it really went wrong (in the ways they are worried about).
    • “ Good news, from just a ‘chance meeting’ I actually feel certain that there are a number of things we might be able to do to really help you.”
  • 240. Review of Objectives
  • 241. Close
  • 242.  
  • 243. Negotiation ‘Trading’
    • Preferential terms must be earned
    • Don’t give away terms immediately
      • Avoid ‘giving away’ commitment to improved terms during the discussion
      • Revisit all terms in conclusion
    • “ if you… then I…”
  • 244. Negotiation Trading
    • What are the things we can ‘trade’?
  • 245. The 6 Essential Stages
    • Become an optimist
    • Seek first to understand, then to be understood
    • Use a consistent, structured sales approach
    • Only present solutions to their problems
    • ‘ Clean your shoes’
    • Continually develop and refresh your communication skills
  • 246. 8 Ineffective Listening Types
    • Inadequate Listening
    • Evaluative Listening
    • Filtered Listening
    • Labels as Filters
    • Fact Centred Rather than Vision Centred Listening
    • Rehearsing
    • Sympathetic Listening
    • Interrupting
  • 247. Positive Language
    • “ Houston we have a problem”
    • “ We will not lose anyone”
    • “ This could be our worst disaster”
    • “ This will be our finest hour”
    • Apollo 13
  • 248. Cognitive Diss onance Vision Current Reality
  • 249. Consultative Approach Knowledge of Problem Knowledge of Solution Low Hi Hi NO GO AREA Start here Don’t assume you know what the solutions are. Don’t assume you know what the problems are. Situation, problems, implications Solutions Gameplan and effective communication 1. Consult 2. Resolve