Applying design thinking and complexity theory in agile organizations

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"Applying design thinking and complexity theory in Agile organizations" …

"Applying design thinking and complexity theory in Agile organizations"
By Jean Tabaka @ Agile Israel 2012

http://agilesparks.com/DesignThinking-JeanTabaka

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  • 1. Applying DesignThinking andComplexity Theory inAgile Organizations Jean Tabaka, Rally Software @jeantabaka
  • 2. Yuval and Ronen
  • 3. An Agile Adoption Story
  • 4. 2002
  • 5. 5000
  • 6. 14
  • 7. 7
  • 8. 1
  • 9. 1
  • 10. We  created  an  algorithm  we  could   exploit.  
  • 11. “Cookbook Agile”
  • 12. Centralized  authority  
  • 13. h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/virtualeyesee/6107062655  
  • 14. Lack  of    innovaEon  
  • 15. Diminishing  customer  base  
  • 16. EscalaEon  
  • 17. Agile    “blame  game”  
  • 18. Why  a  cookbook   won’t  do  
  • 19. We live in a world thatis complex yet craving innovation
  • 20. Our Agile adoptionsmust embrace vision with hunches, exploration and exploitation
  • 21. We need to do thisleveraging emergence, bringing empathy, and inviting “the wildly unexpected”
  • 22. 3  thoughts  
  • 23. Don’t  latch  onto  one  set  of   Agile  pracEces  
  • 24. Invite  principles  and  pracEces  outside  of  Agile  as   your  organizaEon  matures  
  • 25. Combine  emergence  and   resilience  for  sustained     innovaEon  
  • 26. What  you  get  
  • 27. “Thrive versusmerely survive
  • 28. A  look  at  complexity  
  • 29. 4 Dots
  • 30. 6 Connections
  • 31. ? Patterns
  • 32. 64 Patterns
  • 33. 10 Dots
  • 34. 45 Connections
  • 35. ? Patterns
  • 36. Patterns35,184,372,088,832
  • 37. h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/virtualeyesee/6107062655  
  • 38. We live in anunordered, complex world
  • 39. We havecomplexity of…
  • 40. Organizations
  • 41. Capabilities
  • 42. Code-base
  • 43. Customers
  • 44. Markets
  • 45. We  can’t  afford  to  latch   onto  recipes  of…  
  • 46. Order
  • 47. Control
  • 48. Algorithm
  • 49. Are you complex?
  • 50. “What you predictdoesn’t come true.”
  • 51. “What worked yesterday, doesn’t seem to be working today.”
  • 52. “What you don’t know is unknown.”
  • 53. Are  you  a  chef  or  a   recipe  follower?  
  • 54. “It is not possible to prove any new thought, concept or idea in advance.” – Charles Sanders Pierce
  • 55. Analysis and inductionalone cannot manage complexity
  • 56. We should must invite abductive logic
  • 57. Abductive logic:multiple possibleexplanations for something
  • 58. We must invite mystery to allowinnovative patterns to emerge
  • 59. How  do  we  make  sense  of   environments  like  this?  
  • 60. Gaussian probability (“Bellcurve) is not sufficient http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normal_distribution
  • 61. We cannot see the lowprobability, high impact events
  • 62. Pareto plausibilityseeks outliers
  • 63. We  intenEonally  seek   these  low  signal   outliers  
  • 64. Complexity theory
  • 65.   DavidSnowden
  • 66. Cynefin
  • 67. Plausible ProbableUnordered Ordered
  • 68. Plausible ProbableChaotic Complex Complicated SimpleUnordered Ordered
  • 69. Plausible Probable Complex Complicated Chaotic SimpleUnordered Ordered
  • 70. Plausible Probable Complex Complicated DisorderChaotic SimpleUnordered Ordered
  • 71. The relationship between cause and effect
  • 72. Plausible Probable Complex Complicatedonly coherent in requires analysis orretrospect, and not expertiserepeatable Disorder not perceivable obvious & repeatableChaotic SimpleUnordered Ordered
  • 73. What practices areappropriate in each scenario/system?
  • 74. Plausible Probable Complex ComplicatedEmergent practices Good practices Disorder Action Best practicesChaotic SimpleUnordered Ordered
  • 75. What  is  Dave  asking     of  us?  
  • 76. Resilience  vs  Robustness  
  • 77. Effec6veness  vs  Efficiency  
  • 78. The  goal  is  NOT  to  define  your  system  in  one  area   or  another  but  rather   create  movement   appropriately.  
  • 79. Design thinking
  • 80. George Kembeld.school,StanfordUniversity
  • 81. http://dschool.stanford.edu/our-point-of-view/
  • 82. Innovation with empathy
  • 83. Design thinking practices are non-linear
  • 84. Design Thinking
  • 85. Create space for the“wildly unexpected”
  • 86. http://dschool.stanford.edu/dgift/#gear-up
  • 87. Low fidelity prototypes
  • 88. “It is not possible to prove any new thought, concept or idea in advance.” – Charles Sanders Pierce
  • 89. We should must invite abductive logic
  • 90. The balance of Exploration Mystery Heuristics Algorithmwith Exploitation
  • 91. In business, we MUSTbalance searching and shipping.
  • 92. Reliability  vs  Validity     and  the    “predilecEon  gap”  
  • 93. Combining  design   thinking  and  complexity  theory  
  • 94. Embrace  deep  intenEon  around  the  principles  that   guide  your  pracEces.  
  • 95. Probe,  Sense,  Respond  
  • 96. Explore and Exploit
  • 97. Emergence  and  resilience  
  • 98. Empathize  and  innovate  
  • 99. Apply  cogniEve  distribuEon  necessary  in  complexity  
  • 100. Apply  design  thinking  non-­‐linear  empathy  
  • 101. Seek the wildly unexpectedVision & Empathy  
  • 102. Applying DesignThinking andComplexity Theory inAgile Organizations Jean Tabaka, Rally Software @jeantabaka