How to scale Agile
With Scrum as the Foundational Framework
September 21, 2013
Ben Clay
Benjamin.clay@yoh.com
Director of ...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
What Practical Agile is
NPV ROI
BEPTCO
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
What Practical Agile is NOT
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Seven (7) Planning Layers of Practical Agile
Program
Product Vision
(Project)
P...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
High Level Portfolio Roadmap
Q2
In progress
Q3
Planned
Q4
Anticipated
Q1
Antici...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Product Vision Description Sample Template
What is needed? Why do we need it? W...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Release Schedule Sample Template
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Practical Agile Portfolio
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Practical Agile Portfolio Team
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Practical Agile Program
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Resource Backlog Example
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Resource Budget Example
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Budget Burndown Example
15
10
9
8
7
5
4
3
2
1
0
6
30
25
20
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2
Qu...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
NPV, ROI, BEP
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Practical Agile Program Team
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Practical Agile Project Team
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
BONUS: Important Topics for Practically
Scaling Agile
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
BONUS: Vertical Slicing Slides
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
The Layers of a Vertical Slice
UX/UI
Service
Data
Additional Top Layer
Addition...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Vertical User Story
LOGIN
Email
Password
remember me
Forgot Password
As a <USER...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
The Layers of Login
UX/UI
Service
Data
Vertical
To vertically develop all slice...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Dissected by Layer
The developers will need to know what files they will have t...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
BONUS: Vertical User Story Template Slides
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Product Backlog Grooming
Prioritized from 1 - whatever (Example 1 - 500)
• Prio...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Definition of Ready For Vertical User Stories
Vertical User Story
Confir
m
e d ...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Vertical User Story, “Must Have”
TYPE OF USER
ONE ACTION
REASON
NOTE: in the te...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Vertical User Story, “Should Have”
TYPE OF USER
ONE ACTION
REASON
NOTE: in the ...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Vertical User Story, “Would Like To Have”
TYPE OF USER
ONE ACTION
REASON
NOTE: ...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
Release Backlog Grooming
Facilitated by the Scrum Master/APM attended by the Pr...
© 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved
NOTES:
CORPORATE CONTACT INFORMATION
1500 Spring Garden Street
Philadelphia, PA 19130
215.656.2650
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How to scale Agile With Scrum as the Foundational Framework

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Scaling Agile has been the topic of conversation for years, has been achieved for years as well yet rarely documented and socialized. In 2009, while leading an Agile transformation in the parent company at the same time standing up new Scrum teams in their startup subsidiary Ben realized that Scrum should or at least would in his case be the foundational framework for scaling Agile.

Keeping it simple with a collection of small, manageable, functional teams vertically sliced into portfolios, programs and projects to help mitigate the risk of loosing site of the goals and/or objectives of the organization while keeping true to the Agile principals Ben will show you how he and his team scaled Agile multiple times throughout multiple enterprise international organizations, using Scrum as the foundational framework complimented with Lean, Deming, XP and Kanban.

Something important to know is you must use TDD and/or BDD with a continuous integration environment as well as feature/code prefixes and vertical slicing.

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • Not sure how I am fishing or what I am fishing for. As far as I am aware I am just giving feedback in the box that was provided for it.
    My point was that, in a posting dated 23rd September 2013, you stated that Scaling Agile was 'rarely documented and socialized' I commented that I found this not to be the case and gave some examples of where similar material (as in materials documenting Scaling Agile) might be found. Since you seem interested in the subject I thought you might be interested in others' take on it. I even put a smiley on the end so you would know I was a friend.
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  • I was querying the statement 'rarely documented and socialized'
    I merely indicated there are well-known books on the subject and
    your own admission is that there are, indeed, other publications too.
    All unacknowledged in your publication
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  • @David - BTW if any credit it goes to Jeff Sutherland as he was my Coach on an Agile Transformation and everything I learned about scaling Scrum or Agile was from him. His books, training I took and/or his coaching. Moreover, I submitted my version of scaling Scrum to Scrum Inc in late 2010 when I was leading the Scrum Transformation where Jeff was my coach. (The Coach of coaches if you will) All posted prior to 2011. Looks like some up front homework might have served you well in this case had you done it. As far as Craig Larman I have not read any of his books. If you had said authors like, 'Jeff Sutherland', 'Ken Schwaber' or 'Mike Cohn', would be different. Thanks for your post though.
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How to scale Agile With Scrum as the Foundational Framework

  1. 1. How to scale Agile With Scrum as the Foundational Framework September 21, 2013 Ben Clay Benjamin.clay@yoh.com Director of Agile Practice Agile Coach © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved PRACTICAL AGILE
  2. 2. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved What Practical Agile is NPV ROI BEPTCO
  3. 3. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved What Practical Agile is NOT
  4. 4. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Seven (7) Planning Layers of Practical Agile Program Product Vision (Project) Product Roadmap Product Release Portfolio Sprint/Iteration Daily The Chief Product Officer/Owner works with other key stakeholders and/or leadership to identify/define/plan near and far term strategic goals and/or objectives Product Owners work with business leadership to create the product vision aligning business needs The product team defines the upcoming release and plans it with the team The Team manages work daily Product Owners work with the business leadership to create the vision to meet business needs; Product Owners outline the roadmap for the product team to complete Team plans and executes the current Sprint/Iteration Lead Product Owners work with business leadership to plan near term project goals and/or objectives
  5. 5. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved High Level Portfolio Roadmap Q2 In progress Q3 Planned Q4 Anticipated Q1 Anticipated • DB as a Service • Health Information Exchange as a Service September July • Infrastructure as a Service August November • Client Side PACS System December • Mobile Prescription Writing October • PCI Compliance in the Cloud January February March • Card Linked to Offer • Proximity Purchase • Agile Portfolio Tool May • Centralized Access Control as a Service June • Monitoring as a Service
  6. 6. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Product Vision Description Sample Template What is needed? Why do we need it? Who is it for? For all ____________________ who ________________________________, our product __________________ is ________________________, providing _________________________________________________________________ ____. Unlike _____________________________, our ____________________ _________________________.
  7. 7. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Release Schedule Sample Template
  8. 8. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Practical Agile Portfolio
  9. 9. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Practical Agile Portfolio Team
  10. 10. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Practical Agile Program
  11. 11. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Resource Backlog Example
  12. 12. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Resource Budget Example
  13. 13. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Budget Burndown Example 15 10 9 8 7 5 4 3 2 1 0 6 30 25 20 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Quarter Dollars Spent Budgeted DollarsinMillions Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2
  14. 14. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved NPV, ROI, BEP
  15. 15. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Practical Agile Program Team
  16. 16. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Practical Agile Project Team
  17. 17. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved BONUS: Important Topics for Practically Scaling Agile
  18. 18. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved BONUS: Vertical Slicing Slides
  19. 19. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved The Layers of a Vertical Slice UX/UI Service Data Additional Top Layer Additional Middle Layer Additional Bottom Layer
  20. 20. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Vertical User Story LOGIN Email Password remember me Forgot Password As a <USER ROLES>, I must be able to login to my company portal so that I can perform the functions of my job. Acceptance Criteria • Verify that I can log into the system • Verify that my login credentials will be remembered • Verify that I can reset my own password by clicking the "Forgot Password" link • Verify that I cannot navigate back to the landing page without first logging in
  21. 21. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved The Layers of Login UX/UI Service Data Vertical To vertically develop all slices encapsulated therein, they must be accounted for.
  22. 22. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Dissected by Layer The developers will need to know what files they will have to create and/or extend. bootstrap class session class UX/UI Service Data index.jsp CSS constance class / config file user bean database class / ORM database function class template class login service login.jsp landing.jsp JavaScript
  23. 23. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved BONUS: Vertical User Story Template Slides
  24. 24. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Product Backlog Grooming Prioritized from 1 - whatever (Example 1 - 500) • Prioritize each stack ranked list • From most business value to least business value offered • Not everything is a MUST HAVE, if you it doesn’t meet one of the listed MUST HAVE’s above then it isn’t a MUST HAVE • Use this as a guide, a place to start and create your own Must have • Patient safety • Legal concerns • Regulatory mandates • Core functionality • Minimal marketable features Should have • Increase productivity • Could have more on this list based on your business type Would like to have • Fluff • Not something that is needed, but enhances end user experience
  25. 25. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Definition of Ready For Vertical User Stories Vertical User Story Confir m e d pr ior ity All dependencies have been provided (API’s, server access and the like) Impacts to existing business process (Example: Changes to the way some- one logs in) Scenarios Acceptance criteria has been identifie d Wireframes, designs, copy content provided (Anything you need to com- plete a story in the sprint/iteration) Defin e d and agr eed upon busi ness rul es NOTE: the checklist is a guide or a place to start, but you may have more or need less and also keep in mind that you may not need all the listed to make the vertical user story ready. A good idea is to take a look at bill wake’s INVEST criteria and determine what is needed for you.
  26. 26. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Vertical User Story, “Must Have” TYPE OF USER ONE ACTION REASON NOTE: in the template I used, “must have” and I must means you cannot do without it because of end user safety, legal, regulatory, financial and/or simply that the end user cannot do their job without it.
  27. 27. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Vertical User Story, “Should Have” TYPE OF USER ONE ACTION REASON NOTE: in the template we used, “should have” and should have means that the end user should have this feature in order to make their job easier, streamlined and/or whatever it is.
  28. 28. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Vertical User Story, “Would Like To Have” TYPE OF USER ONE ACTION REASON NOTE: in the template we used, “should have” and should have means that the end user should have this feature in order to make their job easier, streamlined and/or whatever it is.
  29. 29. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved Release Backlog Grooming Facilitated by the Scrum Master/APM attended by the Product Owner, Business Analyst, Subject Matter Expert (SME) and team representatives. The reason I say team representatives is because you may not have the time and/or space for the entire team. What happens in this meeting? This meeting is where you want to ensure each user story is vertical and meets all the requirements of the definition of ready. It is important to the success of your project that the user stories are something the Team can complete. If the team cannot complete a story in the sprint/iteration it was intended for then the story didn’t meet the definition of ready. Frequency: Duration: Attendees: Goal(s): Every week (May extend out after you have at least three (3) sprints/iterations worth of vertical user stories groomed. You may adjust the priority as needed, but get all the other, “Definition of Ready” completed.) Two (2) - four (4) hours, doesn’t mean can’t be shorter if it ends sooner then it does. Product Owner, Senior Dev & QA Team Members (Leads), BA, Scrum Master, SME (As needed) To have enough stories ready for the coming sprints/iterations NOTE: The team needs to have enough stories to plan and execute at least the next sprint/iteration. Meet as much as you need in order to compile a prioritized list of user stories that all me the definition of ready.
  30. 30. © 2013 PracticalScrum. All Rights Reserved NOTES:
  31. 31. CORPORATE CONTACT INFORMATION 1500 Spring Garden Street Philadelphia, PA 19130 215.656.2650

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