The Agile BA (Business Analyst)
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The Agile BA (Business Analyst)

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Are you a business analyst (BA) being asked to join an Agile project. Wonder what you are in for?

Are you a business analyst (BA) being asked to join an Agile project. Wonder what you are in for?

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The Agile BA (Business Analyst) The Agile BA (Business Analyst) Presentation Transcript

  • Introduction & Agenda ‣ Bill Gaiennie, Davisbase Consulting ‣ 17 years in software development. ‣ 7 years working with software development teams, training, leading, and coaching Agile teams. ‣ Trained and coached over 500 teams ranging from start-ups to Fortune 50 corporations. ‣ Agenda ‣ A Brief Overview of Agile ‣ The Role of a Business Analyst on a Project ‣ The Role of a Business Analyst on an Agile Project ‣ Why Business Analysts Are Vital to Successful Projects ‣ Wrap-up and Q&A Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Building a Tire Swing How the customer described what they wanted... Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Building a Tire Swing How the project manager understood it... Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Building a Tire Swing How the architect designed it... Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Building a Tire Swing How the programmer wrote it... Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Building a Tire Swing How the business consultant described it... Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Building a Tire Swing How the the project was documented... Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Building a Tire Swing What operations installed... Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Building a Tire Swing How the customer was billed... Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Building a Tire Swing How it was supported... Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Building a Tire Swing What the customer really needed... Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • DEVELOPING SOFTWARE IS TOUGH! • We are building something that doesn’t exist. • Our customer is attempting to describe what they imagine this non-existent product should be. • We then try to imagine what they are describing. • We then try to build the product we believe we heard them describe. • And finally, the first opportunity we have to really see if we built a product that they need and want is after we are done with development. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Pop Quiz: Waterfall Requirements Analysis What percentage of overall project time is spent gathering, elaborating, and communicating product requirements? Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Pop Quiz: Waterfall Requirements Analysis What percentage of overall project time is 50% spent gathering, elaborating, and communicating product requirements? Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Pop Quiz: Waterfall Requirements Analysis What percentage of overall project time is 50% spent gathering, elaborating, and communicating product requirements? What percentage of requirements, as originally defined, change during the course of the project? Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Pop Quiz: Waterfall Requirements Analysis What percentage of overall project time is 50% spent gathering, elaborating, and communicating product requirements? What percentage of requirements, as originally 35% defined, change during the course of the project? Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Pop Quiz: Waterfall Requirements Analysis What percentage of overall project time is 50% spent gathering, elaborating, and communicating product requirements? What percentage of requirements, as originally 35% defined, change during the course of the project? What percentage of features, as ultimately delivered, are rarely or never used by the product’s end-users? Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Pop Quiz: Waterfall Requirements Analysis What percentage of overall project time is 50% spent gathering, elaborating, and communicating product requirements? What percentage of requirements, as originally 35% defined, change during the course of the project? What percentage of features, as ultimately 65% delivered, are rarely or never used by the product’s end-users? Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • So what is Software Project Reality? 31% IT projects will be cancelled before completion 52% Completed projects cost on average 189% over their original estimates 17% Projects are completed on time and on budget Source: Standish Group Chaos Report 1995 - 2008 Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Make No Mistake About It... Developing Software Is TOUGH! Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Companies Are Adopting Agile ‣ Agile adoption has increased in the last several years across the globe. ‣ Recent data suggests 69% of companies have adopted an Agile approach in some form. ‣ Respondents to a recent survey identified improvements in the following areas after adopting an Agile development approach: 82% Increase productivity 77% Increase product quality 78% Increase stakeholder satisfaction 37% Reduced costs Source: Dr. Dobb’s Agile Survey, 2008 Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • So, What Is Agile All About? • A philosophy about software development. • A collection of processes and practices that uphold this philosophy. • A grassroots movement to fundamentally change the approach to software development. “Agility is more attitude than process, more environment than methodology.” Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • The Agile Manifesto We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. http://agilemanifesto.org/ Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Complicated Vs. Complex Watch Making Weather Developing Software Is a Complex Endeavor ‣ Thousands of parts, hundreds of steps to ‣ Difficulty to predict details about behavior or assemble outcomes ‣ Intricate, delicate work, difficult to complete ‣ Outcomes are results of many variables ‣ Must work in specific order ‣ Variables that affect outcomes are difficult to ‣ In order for watch to work, the final build should impossible to predict reliably reflect the original plan. ‣ Plans expect variability and deviation, then ‣ Deviation from plan is considered a defect. account for this in the plan Complicated, but not complex Complex Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Why We Develop Software • We develop software for our customers’ benefit. • Change can be good. Change is usually the result of new information and learning. • The software we develop does not create value for our customer at ‘point of plan’. • An Agile approach may require us to be comfortable with the traditionally uncomfortable. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • The BA’s Role on a Software Project BABOK identifies the following: • Enterprise Analysis • Requirements Planning and Management • Requirements Elicitation • Requirements Analysis and Documentation • Requirements Communication • Solution Assessment and Validation Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • The BA’s Role on an Agile Project • Enterprise Analysis • Requirements Planning and Management • Requirements Elicitation • Requirements Analysis and Documentation • Requirements Communication • Solution Assessment and Validation Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Agile: Enterprise Analysis • Work with the customer to develop strategic goals and a product vision. • Identifying the “value stream” for the proposed product. • Brokering effective information exchange between the customer and the IT team. • The correct scope for Agile projects isn’t defined requirements, but the well articulated product vision. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • “Quality in a product or service Agile BA Rule is not what the supplier puts in. True product quality is more than It is what the customer gets out just a measure of defects. and is willing to pay for. A The customer defines quality. product is not quality because it is hard to make and costs a lot of money, as manufacturers typically believe. This is incompetence. Customers pay only for what is of use to them and gives them value. Nothing else constitutes quality.” s l way - Peter Drucker NotA S ame he T ation De stin Simply stated, the customer defines quality.
  • Agile: Requirements Planning • Requirements evolve with greater product exposure. • A lean principle: just enough, just in time. • Requirements are planned for delivery in time-boxed iterations. • The development team creates and commits to a definition of “done”. • BA’s help to negotiate standards and the specifics of product requirements. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Agile: Analysis & Documentation • Understanding the customer’s needs is essential. • Who are your customers? • How will your customer use your product? • What are your customers priorities? • User Stories capture requirements using the following form: As a <user>, I want <product requirement>, so that <desired benefit>. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Agile: Analysis & Documentation • Understanding “the why” can be as important as “the what”. As an speaker, I want to As an attendee, I want to make my presentation download the available to attendees presentation, so that online, so that I do not I share what I have need to send it. learned. • Information gems exist in knowing why our customers want what they ask for. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Agile: Requirements Communication • The best method of conveying project progress. • Building a better customer/IT relationship. • Emergent requirements. • The product backlog. • Burndown charts can help drive better project decisions. • Taskboards can visually radiate project progress. • Project documentation. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Agile: Assessment and Validation • Delivering the solution in small bites. • Reviewing requirements during planning. • Reviewing requirements during demo. • Requirements describe solution to business needs. • Determining requirements as late as possible. • Validating requirements through prioritizing delivery. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Business Analysts Are Crucial to Agile Project Success • Great products and happy customers begin and end with pliable requirements. • Change happens, how do we embrace it? • Expanding our toolkit, redefining nails as opportunities. • Continuous planning recognizes that change can be good. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Wrap Up • Great BA’s assist the customer is defining the best possible product, a standard consistently examined during the entire project. • Great products emerge from designs that evolve as a result of information made available to the customer and project team. • Great project teams promote open and honest communication, and utilize this information to tune their behavior. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • Your Call To Action ‣ Find experts that can point you in the right direction. ‣ Recognize that training is the proper foundation on which team’s build. ‣ It takes time to get good at anything, Agile is no exception, but the rewards are well worth it. ‣ Getting started is easier than you might think. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • “Simplicity does not precede complexity, it follows it.” - Alan Perlis “Whether your next project is a SUCCESS or a failure is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice.” - A wise Agile coach and trainer
  • Your Questions, My Answers Note: For those questions we do not have time to answer during the webinar, I will be providing a written response. Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden
  • WRAP-UP • Thank you. • Bill Gaiennie, Davisbase Consulting • bill@davisbase.org • http://www.davisbase.org • (949) 303-9109 Copyright 2010 Davisbase LLC. Distribution without express permission is forbidden