The Sol planetary system

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This was completed as a training tool for a Star Trek club, and therefore contains references to Impulse- and Warp- speeds as well as Starfleet planetary classifications.
This project was also completed before Pluto's planetary status was revoked. The idea was for each presenter to learn about the solar system.

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The Sol planetary system

  1. 1. The Sol Planetary System By Lt. Commander Jill H. Bogler Composite picture
  2. 2. Planetary Diameters <ul><li>Inner Planets </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mercury </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diameter 4,880 km </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Venus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diameter 12,100 km </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Earth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diameter 12,760 km </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mars </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diameter 6,800 km </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Outer Planets </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Jupiter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diameter 143,800 km </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Saturn </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diameter 120,000 km </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uranus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diameter 52,300 km </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Neptune </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diameter 49,500 km </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diameter 3,000 km (est.) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Mercury <ul><li>Planetary Classification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class J (Geo- Morteus ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>High surface temperatures due to their proximity to the star </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Atmospheres are extremely tenuous with few chemically active gases </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Natural Satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>None </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Venus <ul><li>Planetary Classification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class C (Reducing) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>High surface temperatures due to the “greenhouse effect” caused by their dense atmospheres </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The only water on these planets is found in vapor form </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Natural Satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>None </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Earth <ul><li>Planetary Classification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class M (Terrestrial) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Oxygen/Nitrogen Atmosphere </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Water and life-forms are typically abundant </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Note: If water covers more than 97% of surface, these are then “Class N” </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Natural Satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Luna (The Moon) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Class I (Asteroid/Moon) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No atmosphere </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Surfaces are barren and cratered </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Mars <ul><li>Planetary Classification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class K (Adaptable) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Adaptable for humanoid colonization through the use of pressure domes and other life support devices </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Thin atmosphere </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Small amounts of water </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Natural Satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Phobos </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Class I </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deimos </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Class I </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Jupiter <ul><li>Planetary Classification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class A (Gas Super Giant) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>High core temperature and radiates heat </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Low stellar radiation & high planet gravity enables Gas Giants to keep a tenuous surface comprised of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen compounds </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Natural Satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Io Class D </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Europa No exact type match (Close to Class L) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ganymede Class L </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Callisto Class L </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Amalthea Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Himalia Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Elara Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pasiphae Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sinope Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lysithea Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Carme Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ananke Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leda Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thebe Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adrastea Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Metis Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul>Composite picture
  8. 8. Saturn <ul><li>Planetary Classification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class B (Gas Giant) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>High core temperature, but doesn’t radiate much heat </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Low stellar radiation & high planet gravity enables Gas Giants to keep a tenuous surface comprised of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen compounds </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Natural Satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mimas Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enceladus Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tethys Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dione Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rhea Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Titan Class C </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hyperion Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Iapetus Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phoebe Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Janus Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Epimetheus Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Helene Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Telesto Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Calypso Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Atlas Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prometheus Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pandora Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pan Class I </li></ul></ul>Composite picture
  9. 9. Uranus <ul><li>Planetary Classification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class B (Gas Giant) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>High core temperature, but doesn’t radiate much heat </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Low stellar radiation & high planet gravity enables Gas Giants to keep a tenuous surface comprised of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen compounds </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Natural Satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ariel Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Umbriel Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Titania Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Oberon Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Miranda Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cordelia Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ophelia Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bianca Unknown </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cressida Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Desdemona Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Juliet Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Portia Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rosalind Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Belinda Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Puck Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Caliban Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sycorax Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prospero Unknown </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Setebos (1999 U1) Unknown </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stephano (1999 U2) Unknown </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1999 U3 Unknown </li></ul></ul>Composite picture
  10. 10. Neptune <ul><li>Planetary Classification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class B (Gas Giant) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>High core temperature, but doesn’t radiate much heat </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Low stellar radiation & high planet gravity enables Gas Giants to keep a tenuous surface comprised of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen compounds </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Natural Satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Triton Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nereid Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Naiad Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thalassa Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Despina Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Galatea Class I (assumed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Larissa Class I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Proteus Class I </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Pluto <ul><li>Planetary Classification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class L (Geo-Inactive) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Low solar radiation and minimal internal heat usually result in a frozen atmosphere </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Natural Satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Charon </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Class I (Asteroid/Moon) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No atmosphere </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Surfaces are barren and cratered </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Note: This picture of Pluto is a drawing, as there is no clear photograph of Pluto at this time. A mission is scheduled to send a probe to Pluto in the near future.
  12. 12. Warp Speed Calculations <ul><li>Average distance from Sun in Astronomical Units & kilometers </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1 AU = approx. 150,000,000 km (93,000,000 miles) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Full Impulse = 270,000,000 kilometers per hour </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 4,500,000 kilometers per minute </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sun 0.0 AU </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mercury 0.39 AU 58,500,000 km from Sun </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Venus 0.72 AU 108,000,000 km from Sun </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Earth 1.0 AU 150,000,000 km from Sun </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mars 1.5 AU 225,000,000 km from Sun </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jupiter 5.2 AU 780,000,000 km from Sun </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Saturn 9.5 AU 1,425,000,000 km from Sun </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uranus 19.2 AU 2,880,000,000 km from Sun </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Neptune 30.1 AU 4,515,000,000 km from Sun </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto 39.5 AU 5,925,000,000 km from Sun </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. At Full Impulse Speed (Sun) <ul><li>From the Sun to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mercury 13 Minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Venus 24 Minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Earth 33.333 Minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mars 50 Minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>From the Sun to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Jupiter 173.334 Minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 2.889 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Saturn 316.667 Minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 5.277 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uranus 640 Minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 10.667 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Neptune 1,003.334 Minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 16.722 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto 11,761.11 Minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 196.018 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 14. At Full Impulse Speed (Mercury) <ul><li>From Mercury to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Venus (.33 AU ) 11 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Earth (.61 AU) 20.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mars (1.11 AU) 37 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jupiter (4.81 AU) 160.334 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 2.672 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>From Mercury to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Saturn (9.11 AU) 303.667 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 5.061 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uranus (18.81 AU) 640 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 10.667 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Neptune (29.71 AU) 990.334 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 16.506 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto (39.11 AU) 1,303.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 21.722 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul>
  15. 15. At Full Impulse Speed (Venus) <ul><li>From Venus to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Earth (.28 AU ) 9.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mars (.78 AU) 26 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jupiter (4.48 AU) 149.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 2.489 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>From Venus to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Saturn (8.78 AU) 292.667 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 4.878 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uranus (18.48 AU) 616 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 10.267 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Neptune (29.38 AU) 979.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 16.322 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto (38.78 AU) 1,292.667 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 21.544 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul>
  16. 16. At Full Impulse Speed (Earth) <ul><li>From Earth to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mars (.5 AU ) 16.667 Min . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jupiter (4.2 AU) 140 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 2.333 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Saturn (8.5) 283.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 4.722 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>From Earth to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Uranus (18.2 AU) 606.667 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 10.111 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Neptune (29.1 AU) 970 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 16.167 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto (38.5 AU) 1,283.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 21.389 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul>
  17. 17. At Full Impulse Speed (Mars & Jupiter) <ul><li>From Mars to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Jupiter (3.7 AU ) 123.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 2.056 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Saturn (8 AU) 266.667 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 4.444 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uranus (17.7 AU) 590 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 9.833 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Neptune (28.6 AU) 953.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 15.889 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto (38 AU) 1,266.667 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 21.111 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>From Jupiter to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Saturn (4.3 AU) 143.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 2.389 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uranus (14 AU) 466.667 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 7.778 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Neptune (24.9AU) 830 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 13.833 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto (34.3 AU) 1,143.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 19.056 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul>
  18. 18. At Full Impulse Speed (Saturn, Uranus, Neptune & Pluto) <ul><li>From Saturn to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Uranus (9.7 AU ) 323.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 5.389 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Neptune (20.6 AU) 686.667 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 11.444 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto (30 AU) 1,000 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 16.667 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>From Uranus to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Neptune (10.9AU) 363.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 6.056 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto (20.3 AU) 676.667 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 11.278 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>From Neptune to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pluto (9.4 AU) 313.333 Min. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>or 5.222 Hours </li></ul></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Planetary Classifications (Class A, B, C & D) <ul><li>Class A – Gas Supergiant </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually found in a star’s outer or “cold” zone. Typically 140,000 to 10,000,000 km in diameter and have high core temperatures causing them to radiate heat. Low stellar radiation & high planet gravity enables them to keep a tenuous surface comprised of gaseous hydrogen & hydrogen compounds. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Arcturus 5, Betelgeuse 3, Sol 5 , Vega 5 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class B – Gas Giant </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually found in a star’s outer or “cold” zone. Typically 50,000 to 140,000 km in diameter and have high core temperatures, but do not radiate much heat. Low stellar radiation & high planet gravity enables them to keep a tenuous surface comprised of gaseous hydrogen & hydrogen compounds. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>61 Cygni 7, Canopus 7, Epsilon Indi 7, Sol 6 , Sol 7 , Sol 8 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class C – Reducing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually found in a star’s “habitable” zone. Typically 10,000 to 15,000 km in diameter. High surface temperatures due to the “greenhouse effect” caused by their dense atmospheres. The only water found is in vapor form. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alpha Tauri 2, Medusa, Sol 2 , Tholia </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class D – Geo-Plastic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually found in a star’s “habitable” zone. Typically 10,000 to 15,000 km in diameter. They have a molten surface because they have recently formed. The atmosphere contains many hydrogen compounds and reactive gases. Class D planets eventually cool, becoming Class E. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Epsilon Indi 3, Excalbia </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Planetary Classifications (Class E, F, G & H) <ul><li>Class E – Geo-Metalic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class E planets have a molten core and are usually found in a star’s “habitable” zone. Typically 10,000 to 15,000 km in diameter. Their atmospheres still contain hydrogen compounds. They will cool further eventually becoming Class F. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>61 Cygni 4, Altair 3, Capella 3, Rigel 3 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class F – Geo-Crystaline </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class F planets are usually found in a star’s “habitable” zone or “cold” zone. Typically 1,000 to 10,000 km in diameter. They have partially molten surfaces and atmospheres that contain many hydrogen compounds. They cool becoming Class L. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Delta Vega 2, Vega 4 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class G - Desert </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Planets of this class can be found in any of a star’s zones.. Typically 8,000 to 15,000 km in diameter. Their surfaces are usually hot. Their atmospheres contain heavy gases and metal vapors. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Capella 4, Ceti Alpha 5, Triacus </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class H – Geo-Thermal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually found in a star’s “habitable” zone. Typically 10,000 to 15,000 km in diameter. They have a molten surface because they have recently formed. The atmosphere contains many hydrogen compounds and reactive gases. Class D planets eventually cool, becoming Class E. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alpha Centauri 5, Gothos, T’khut (40 Eridani 2) </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Planetary Classifications (Class I, J, K & L) <ul><li>Class I – Asteroid/Moon </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Planetary bodies of this class can be found in any of a star’s zones. They are usually found in orbit of larger planets or in asteroid fields. They are typically 100 to 1,000 km in diameter. They have no atmospheres. Their surfaces are barren and cratered. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ceres, Deimos, Kera, Luna , Phinda, Phobos </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class J – Geo-Morteus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Found in a star’s “hot” zone. They are typically 1,000 to 10,000 km in diameter. They have high surface temperatures due to the proximity to the star. Their atmospheres are extremely tenuous with few chemically active gases. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alpha Tauri 1, Altair 1 & 2, Sol 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class K - Adaptable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>K-Class planets are usually found in a star’s “habitable” zone. They are adaptable for humanoid colonization through the use of pressure domes and other life support devices. They are typically 5,000 to 10,000 km in diameter. They have thin atmospheres. Small amounts of water are present. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Canopus 5, Sol 4, Mudd, Sol 4 , Sirius 4 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class L – Geo-Inactive </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually found in a star’s “habitable” zone or “cold” zone. Typically 1,000 to 10,000 km in diameter. Low solar radiation and minimal internal heat usually result in a frozen atmosphere. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aurelia, Marcos 12, Psi-2000, Sol 9 </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Planetary Classifications (Class M, N, S & T) <ul><li>Class M - Terrestrial </li></ul><ul><ul><li>M-Class planets are found in a star’s “habitable” zone. They are typically 10,000 to 15,000 km in diameter. They have atmospheres that contain oxygen and nitrogen. Water and life-forms are typically abundant. If water covers more than 97% of the surface, then they are considered Class N. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aldebaran, Betazed, Earth , Q’onos, Vulcan </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class N - Terrestrial </li></ul><ul><ul><li>N-Class planets are found in a star’s “habitable” zone. They are typically 10,000 to 15,000 km in diameter. They have atmospheres that contain oxygen and nitrogen. Water and life-forms are typically abundant. If water covers less than 97% of the surface, then they are considered Class M. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Argo, Ascella, Canopus 8, Deneb 3 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class S – Near Star </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class S planets are usually found in a star’s “cold” zone. They are typically 50,000,000 to 120,000,000 km in diameter and have high core temperatures causing them to radiate heat & light. These are the largest possible planets, because most planetary bodies that reach this size do become stars. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bruedon Beta 4, Delta 10, Shonoisho </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class T – Gas Ultragiant </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually found in a star’s “cold” zone. Typically 10,000,000 to 50,000,000 km in diameter. They have high core temperatures causing them to radiate enough heat to keep water in a liquid state </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bruedon Epsilon 5, Optima Alpha 5 </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. Planetary Classifications (Class Y) <ul><li>Class Y – Caustic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Also called “Demon” class, Class Y planets and planetoids can be found in any of a star’s zones. They are typically 10,000 to 15,000 km in diameter. Atmospheric conditions are often turbulent and saturated with poisonous chemicals and thermionic radiation. Surface temperatures can reach in excess of 225 C. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Starfleet note: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Communication is frequently impossible, and transport may be difficult. Simply entering orbit is a dangerous prospect. No known environment is less hospitable to humanoid life than a Class Y planetary body. </li></ul></ul>
  24. 24. Sources Used <ul><li>Kaufmann DISCOVERING THE UNIVERSE </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Copyright 1987 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(Used for planetary dimensions) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>http://www. solarviews .com/ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Website </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(Used for pictures & names of moons) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>http://free.freespeech.org/tustc/planets </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Website </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(Used for planetary classifications) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>THE STAR TREK ENCYCLOPEDIA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>By Michael & Denise Okuda </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Copyright 1999 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(Used for Warp and Impulse speed calculations) </li></ul></ul></ul>

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