Designing your study: Linking gender
and nutrition through qual and quant
methods
Agnes R. Quisumbing
IFPRI/A4NH
Presentat...
Overview
• There are many research methods to use for linking
gender, agriculture, and nutrition
• Need to remember the ri...
Why should the design take linkages into
account from the start?
Qual and quant methods
• Demonstrated gains from
various ...
What to take into account in designing your study
Qual and quant
•
•

•
•

•

Integrated and iterative qual and
quant
Qual...
Food-Based Approaches to Reducing Micronutrient Malnutrition
Intervention: Dissemination of improved agricultural
technolo...
Evaluating the long-term impact of agricultural
technologies in Bangladesh
Panel data set based on 957 households surveyed...
Survey Design in 1996/7
-4 round panel 1996/1997
-Coverage of 3 major agric. seasons
-3 sites, 47 villages, 955 HHs
IN EAC...
What has happened after 10 years?
Data collection efforts over the years
• 1996-97: 4-round quantitative household survey
• Qualitative work on gender condu...
Information collected at household and individual levels in 199697 and 2006-7 rounds
Household
•
•
•
•

Per capita expendi...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Day 1 Session 7 Quisumbing_ Linking mixed methods

458 views
337 views

Published on

Gender Nutrition Methods Workshop- 2013

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
458
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Day 1 Session 7 Quisumbing_ Linking mixed methods

  1. 1. Designing your study: Linking gender and nutrition through qual and quant methods Agnes R. Quisumbing IFPRI/A4NH Presentation at the A4NH Methods Gender-Nutrition Methods Workshop, December 6-7, 2013, Nairobi
  2. 2. Overview • There are many research methods to use for linking gender, agriculture, and nutrition • Need to remember the right tool for the right question, but most importantly, need to have an appropriate study design • An ideal study design to understand gender, agriculture, health, nutrition linkages must be able to link and integrate: – Qualitative and quantitative methods – Social science and nutrition data
  3. 3. Why should the design take linkages into account from the start? Qual and quant methods • Demonstrated gains from various research programs from using mixed methods work (CPRC, CAPRi, IFPRI intrahousehold, GAAP, etc.) • Quant work allows you to measure impacts, qual work enables you to understand why • Both are important Social science and nutrition • Social norms underlying decisionmaking processes often determine the allocation of resources toward health and nutrition • Among these are norms and practices surrounding gender
  4. 4. What to take into account in designing your study Qual and quant • • • • • Integrated and iterative qual and quant Qual and quant researchers work together to define research questions, analyze and interpret results Qual study as diagnostic, help frame the questions Use quant sample to define “frame” of qual study—then can link qual study responses to quant data Quant sample typically uses larger n, qual study can use small to medium n, but be purposive Social sciences and nutrition • Have a “theory of behavior” that links behavior to nutrition outcomes • Collect data on determinants (gender, resources, etc.) and on outcomes (nutrition, health, education, etc.) • Collect data on the same individuals (same households) for whom you are collecting nutrition outcomes
  5. 5. Food-Based Approaches to Reducing Micronutrient Malnutrition Intervention: Dissemination of improved agricultural technologies (vegetables and fish) Nutrition Objective: Improve micronutrient status of producer population
  6. 6. Evaluating the long-term impact of agricultural technologies in Bangladesh Panel data set based on 957 households surveyed in 1996/7 and 2006/7 3 technologies/implementation modalities: 1. improved vegetables for homestead production, disseminated through women’s groups (Saturia) 2. fishpond technology through women’s groups (Jessore) 3. fish pond technology targeted to individuals (Mymensingh) Compare “early adopters” to “late adopters” Page 6
  7. 7. Survey Design in 1996/7 -4 round panel 1996/1997 -Coverage of 3 major agric. seasons -3 sites, 47 villages, 955 HHs IN EACH SITE HH type NGO member adopters NGO member, likely adopters Page 7 Type of NGO village “A” technology had been introduced “B” technology had not yet been introduced A (n=110/site) Non-NGO members, C1 (n=55/site) general population B (n=110/site) C2 (n=55/site)
  8. 8. What has happened after 10 years?
  9. 9. Data collection efforts over the years • 1996-97: 4-round quantitative household survey • Qualitative work on gender conducted between rounds 3 and 4 (Naved 2000) • 2001: Qualitative work and further quantitative analysis to look at impact of new technologies on poverty, empowerment, vulnerability in 2000 (Hallman, Lewis, Begum 2007) • 2006-2007: Qual-quant chronic poverty study – Focus groups (25% of sample villages) – Quant household survey (all respondents and new households formed from original) – Life histories (based on poverty transition category; poverty status computed from quant survey) • 2010: Follow up on impacts of food price crisis Page 9
  10. 10. Information collected at household and individual levels in 199697 and 2006-7 rounds Household • • • • Per capita expenditures (food, nonfood consumption) Household assets and landholdings Household income, by source Detailed production module Individual • • • • • Note that dietary diversity modules were relatively “new” at the time of the baseline • survey, but DD scores can be calculated from the food consumption module at household or Individual levels Page 10 HH roster information (age, sex, education, relationship to hh head) Schooling, labor and employment Land and assets Individual food consumption, 24hour recall (and then converted to nutrient equivalents), all individuals Hemoglobin (via Hemocue), all children and women up to age 65 Height, weight for all hh members

×