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2014 Mid-biennium Review

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In recent weeks, Governor Kasich introduced a Mid-biennium Review bill (MBR) to propose budget and policy ideas to transform Ohio. It has been split into 14 different pieces of legislation and is …

In recent weeks, Governor Kasich introduced a Mid-biennium Review bill (MBR) to propose budget and policy ideas to transform Ohio. It has been split into 14 different pieces of legislation and is currently being discussed in a number of House committees. Learn more about the MBR and changes to health and human services, education and workforce development in Ohio.

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  • One Unified State Workforce PlanOhio’s workforce training system is frequently criticized for being complicated, duplicative and misaligned.  Ohio’s three most significant workforce programs submit individual state plans, the policy frameworks guiding each of the programs, to the federal government.  Each program is important to the workforce development system in Ohio, but operates in its own silo.  Requiring one consolidated state plan for all three programs –– will create better alignment, cooperation and collaboration.  With one integrated state plan, the programs will become a more unified workforce system that supports business in meeting its workforce needs.  We will be working to have an integrated state plan in effect July 2015.  To meet this goal, we will plan to submit the plan to the federal government by December 31, 2014.Workforce Success MeasuresWhile many programs collect important data to evaluate their performance, the data is not consistent across all programs, and it is difficult to access in a simple, clear, aggregated way.  Without simple, clear workforce metrics for our programs, we are missing an opportunity to track, evaluate and improve our workforce programs.  The MBR includes a provision that requires Ohio to establish clear, simple and consistent performance metrics for Ohio’s four largest workforce programs and a public, online dashboard to evaluate what is working and what is not in our workforce system.
  • Inventory of Education ProgramsThe bill requires the Board of Regents to develop and a make available publicly online, a complete inventory of Ohio’s public education and training programs, including state institutions, career technical institutions and state regulated apprenticeship programs.  Ohio has never had a thorough inventory of education and training programs - this becomes an awesome tool for jobseekers, business and workforce partners.  A requirement in law enhances the State’s ability to maintain a thorough inventory of the education and training programs and collect the necessary data to provide information about education capacity in specific areas and programs.  The information offers critical information to a person thinking about their career options and planning next steps.
  • B&C ReformRequiring boards and commissions to apply for GI Bill eligibility, ensuring that their testing fees to receive licenses and certificates are covered by the GI Bill benefit. Requiring boards and commissions with regulatory authority of occupational licenses to establish a process to expedite and prioritize licensing and certification for veterans and their spouses. Requiring boards and commissions to adopt a standardized definition of veteran to ensure that the State treats all veterans equally and provides priority of service to the broadest possible definition of veteran. Requires the Ohio Department of Veteran Services to create a centralized website that provides state occupational licensing information to veterans and their spouses and provide additional support and assistance to Ohio’s boards and commissions serving veterans. College and University ReformRequiring Ohio’s higher education system to develop a set of standards and procedures for granting college credit for military experience.   Requiring that Ohio’s public colleges and universities cannot charge for the evaluation, transcription and application of college credit for military experience - while the majority of Ohio’s state-supported colleges and universities do not charge veterans for such credits, this has not been universal.  Requiring a veterans-specific appeals process regarding the award of credits in the event that a veteran would ever need to question a decision regarding military-training credit. Requiring that every Ohio’s public college and universities have a veteran office or specifically assigned counselors to support transitioning veterans so that veterans know of the many opportunities available on a college campus.  Requiring that every Ohio’s public college and university provide veterans and active military members with priority course registration to ensure they have access to the classes they need to succeed and thrive in civilian life.
  • B&C ReformRequiring boards and commissions to apply for GI Bill eligibility, ensuring that their testing fees to receive licenses and certificates are covered by the GI Bill benefit. Requiring boards and commissions with regulatory authority of occupational licenses to establish a process to expedite and prioritize licensing and certification for veterans and their spouses. Requiring boards and commissions to adopt a standardized definition of veteran to ensure that the State treats all veterans equally and provides priority of service to the broadest possible definition of veteran. Requires the Ohio Department of Veteran Services to create a centralized website that provides state occupational licensing information to veterans and their spouses and provide additional support and assistance to Ohio’s boards and commissions serving veterans. College and University ReformRequiring Ohio’s higher education system to develop a set of standards and procedures for granting college credit for military experience.   Requiring that Ohio’s public colleges and universities cannot charge for the evaluation, transcription and application of college credit for military experience - while the majority of Ohio’s state-supported colleges and universities do not charge veterans for such credits, this has not been universal.  Requiring a veterans-specific appeals process regarding the award of credits in the event that a veteran would ever need to question a decision regarding military-training credit. Requiring that every Ohio’s public college and universities have a veteran office or specifically assigned counselors to support transitioning veterans so that veterans know of the many opportunities available on a college campus.  Requiring that every Ohio’s public college and university provide veterans and active military members with priority course registration to ensure they have access to the classes they need to succeed and thrive in civilian life.
  • Thank you, Mark. I appreciate the opportunity to share what House Bill 487 proposes for Ohio’s public education system. As I’ve led the Ohio Department of Education over the last year, we’ve worked closely with the General Assembly to implement changes that will help Ohio’s students get a better education.
  • Over the past two years, we’ve championed several initiatives to strengthen our schools. These include the Third Grade Reading Guarantee and an A–F Report Card that holds schools more accountable for how well they are educating our children. We have also created a $250 million Straight A Fund to spur educational innovation.  Looking back, I realize that I was fortunate to receive a good education. I hope all of you listening today were fortunate in that way, too. But many children today are not so lucky. Most of these children are smart students. But they have fallen victim to local education systems that don’t recognize their unique gifts, that don’t expect them to do great things, and that move them along without the skills they need to be successful.
  • One of those skills is reading. Research has shown that students who don’t read proficiently by the third grade are four times more likely to drop out of school. Because Ohio’s new Third Grade Reading Guarantee requires schools to identify struggling readers early and give them the help they need, I believe the guarantee will help our children stay in school in the long run. But the guarantee’s impact on students dropping out in the upper grades will take some time. There is one outcome we can often expect from children who don’t master basic reading skills in the earliest grades: they will disappear. As they advance to higher grades they feel overwhelmed in school. It becomes a painful experience. And they start to fade from the front row to the back; from good attendance to bad---until one day, they’re just gone. 24,000 girls and boys disappeared from Ohio’s schools last year. This is simply unacceptable. Again, research tells us what happens next. Ohioans entering the world without a high school diploma are twice as likely to live in poverty as those who graduated. They are far more likely to be incarcerated, and they can’t even enter the military. We simply have to keep these children in school.
  • That means we must act now for students at risk of leaving school today. House Bill 487 will focus on students that are on the edge of leaving school. Proposed programs in the bill will help find these students, get them the help they need, offer them new pathways to a diploma. To help schools find at-risk students, the department of education will work with experts in the field. We’ll create a research-based tool that schools can use to identify an at-risk student and show why they are at risk. The sooner we find these girls and boys, the sooner we can help them.  When a school identifies a student at risk of dropping out, the teacher, advisor, family, and student will sit down to discuss what might be going wrong and how they can fix it. They can talk about how advising, including career advising or career guidance, will help that student.
  • A valuable tool for teachers and advisors is OhioMeansJobs.com, the state’s job-services website. A partnership of state agencies is creating a student section, or “youth portal” on this site. The youth portal will have age-appropriate career planning tools and a menu of career opportunities that shows students what jobs are available, what they pay, and what it takes to get them.  Once the team comes up with a plan, the student can try a new pathway or a mixture of pathways – whatever is best for that girl or boy.
  • We know that the traditional path through school simply does not work for every student. This legislative proposal creates or strengthens three other, broadly defined pathways to a diploma. First, there are dropout prevention and recovery programs with flexible schedules and online options. Students in these programs often need extra help, even outside of school. House Bill 487 will strengthen the programs by requiring a partnership with other community organizations that can provide wraparound services to their students. Second, using the flexibility granted in this proposal, school districts could offer their students unique pathways to a diploma. For example, a school district could have an arts pathway that would exempt arts students from Algebra II, a course that’s not aligned to their career goals.  A school district also could have a pathway that focuses on science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Instead of taking four years of foreign language, these students could learn a programming language or continue to advance in math.  Finally, career-technical education is an excellent pathway for many students. Today, career-tech centers offer technical training programs that prepare students for college and valuable industry skills. For example, students that want to be engineers can get a head start on college degrees in hands-on environments and in a ways that interest them.  House Bill 487 would extend access to career-technical programs down to seventh and eighth grades. Right now, most students begin career-tech programs in their junior year. But this is typically too late for students already disengaged from school. Schools could opt out, but they would have to publicly explain why.  These alternate diploma pathways are not prescribed in detail, and they are not a permanent choice. If a student takes career-tech courses in seventh grade, that student does not have to continue on that path forever. The pathway must adjust to the student’s needs and interests.
  • There are a lot of pieces to the dropout puzzle, and it is easy to lose track of all the options. That is why we are asking every school district to create a career-advising policy and make it available to parents and the community, so they know what their schools are doing and how they might help.
  • I do believe that communities are willing to help our students, but they need us to tell them how. As part of the proposal we are creating a new initiative called Community Connectors. This program will support the best ideas in our state for bringing together schools, parents, community organizations, faith-based groups, business leaders, and students to offer mentoring that is based on proven practices.  Community Connectors will grant a total of $10 million to help kick-start the best, most sustainable programs, prioritizing school districts with high poverty and low graduation rates.
  • Another critical area addressed in this legislation is high school diplomas for adults. One million Ohioans do not have a high school diploma. And their income, job opportunities, and education options are limited. In fact, Ohioans 22 years old and older currently cannot earn a high school diploma. This has to change.  House Bill 487 includes a pilot program that gives these adults a pathway to a diploma. Instead of going back to a high school, they can attend a community or technical college to get a high school diploma. Once there, an adult will work toward a valuable industry credential or certificate. When this adult completes the program and earns the credential or certificate, he or she will also receive a high school diploma and be connected to a job.
  • We need to get stakeholders together to work out some of the details of this program. The Chancellor of the Board of Regents and I will work together closely to select and support pilot sites during the 2014-2015 academic year. The proposal provides for $2.5 million in start-up money for selected programs so they can prepare for students to enroll in the 2015-2016 academic year.
  • House Bill 487 also involves other proposals, related to the licensing of new teachers and better identify failing school districts. I won’t have time to go into those, but I believe they also can help strengthen our state’s education system.  As I said earlier, over the past few years, the Ohio Department of Education has partnered with the General Assembly to prepare students for success. I believe House Bill 487 builds on that success to ensure that every student can reach a diploma, have the chance to earn a good income, and keep his or her family out of poverty.
  • Working together, our state, schools, teachers, parents, and communities can keep our children in school and graduate them ready for successful adult lives.  I’ll be happy to take any questions you may have during the question and answer period.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Phone Number: 213-416-1560 Guest Access Code: 198 678 477 The Mid-biennium Review
    • 2. Featuring: Tracy Plouck Director, Ohio Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services Tracy Intihar Director, Governor's Office of Workforce Transformation Dr. Richard A. Ross Superintendent of Public Instruction, Ohio Department of Education Lori Hellenthal County Operations Manager, Ohio Job & Family Services Directors' Association THE MID-BIENNIUM REVIEW
    • 3. ADVOCATES FOR OHIO’S FUTURE WHO WE ARE A statewide coalition of over 450 organizations working together to promotes health and human service budget and policy solutions so that all Ohioans live better lives.
    • 4. • Strengthen Ohio with Healthy Communities • Create More and Better Jobs for Ohioans • Make Ohio More Competitive with Great Public Services ADVOCATES FOR OHIO’S FUTURE OUR FOCUS
    • 5. MID-BIENNIUM REVIEW TIMELINE Mar 11 – Kasich Administration releases MBR proposal (House Bill 472 – HB 472). Mar 18 – Speaker Batchelder announces HB 472 will be split into 14 different bills and assigned to 11 different committees and subcommittees. Mar 23 – Columbus Dispatch reports Republican legislative leaders might wait until after the November election before acting on Gov. John Kasich’s proposed tax package
    • 6. TRACY PLOUCK Director of Ohio Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services
    • 7. • Seeking to support continued transformation as more Ohioans served in our system obtain health care benefits • Expand planning and actions needed to address some longstanding challenges – Crisis and housing – Prevention capacity – Hospital EMR infrastructure 7 Tracy J. Plouck, Director | http://www.mha.ohio.gov/
    • 8. 8
    • 9. • $6.5 million for statewide prevention initiatives Statewide youth survey Infrastructure and training for community prevention coalitions Support to expand Youth-Led Prevention Network Training and support for evidence-based prevention practices $1.5 million to support prevention providers to provide additional support in light of SAPT block grant changes 9
    • 10. • $7.5 million to double the Residential State Supplement program • Funding used by many with mental illness to supplement income for housing and other living needs in licensed settings of 16 beds or less • Implement recommendations from RSS study committee • Expected to enroll an additional 1,000 people 10
    • 11. • $31.5 million to address gaps in continuum of care, with an emphasis on crisis and housing • $30 million: implement in consultation with the boards; will be based on needs identified in local community plans • Will build on former collaborative efforts (“hot spots”) but funding relationships may vary • $1.5 million will be used to supplement needs of women’s treatment providers resulting from SAPT 11
    • 12. • Pursue a shared services arrangement for electronic health record already in use at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center (up to $2 million) • ALSO: $15 million in community capital expected • Addresses BOTH mental health and addiction needs • This proposal will only work and be sustainable if we all work together as a system to move forward. 12
    • 13. 2014 MID-BIENNIUM REVIEW: ENHANCING OHIO’S WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM TRACY INTIHAR DIRECTOR
    • 14. ALIGNING OHIO’S WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM • One Unified State Workforce Plan • Requiring one consolidated state plan for all three programs -- ABLE, Perkins and WIA will create better alignment, cooperation and collaboration. • The programs would work together on shared goals and outcomes that would take critical steps forward in creating a unified workforce system. • Workforce Success Measures • Establishing clear, simple and consistent performance metrics is an important goal for our workforce transformation work and is a priority of the Governor's Executive Workforce Board. • Aligned workforce metrics and public online dashboard will create an opportunity to evaluate what is working and what is not in our workforce system. House Bill 488
    • 15. ALIGNING OHIO’S WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM • Inventory of Education Programs • To tackle the workforce supply/demand question in areas of critical workforce needs, Ohio needs to develop a tool to show the supple side of the equation. • The Ohio Board of Regents is building the inventory of education and training programs to allow for a thorough review and evaluation of the capacity of our education and training programs and institutions. House Bill 484
    • 16. PRIORITIZING VETERANS AS A READY WORKFORCE College Credit for Military Training and Experience • Requiring BOR to develop a set of standards and procedures for granting college credit for military experience. BOR has an opportunity to provide support and assistance to institutions. • Prohibiting Ohio’s public colleges and universities from charging for the evaluation, transcription and application of college credit for military experience. • Establishing veterans-specific appeals process regarding the award of credits in the event that a veteran would ever need to question a decision regarding military- training credit. • Requiring that every Ohio’s public college and universities have a veteran office or specifically assigned counselors to support transitioning veterans. • Requiring that every Ohio’s public college and university provide veterans and active military members with priority course registration to ensure they have access to the classes they need to succeed and thrive in civilian life. House Bill 488
    • 17. PRIORITIZING VETERANS AS A READY WORKFORCE Credit for Occupational Licenses for Military Training and Experience • Boards and commissions will be required to apply for GI Bill eligibility, ensuring that their testing fees to receive licenses and certificates are covered by the benefit. • Boards and commissions with regulatory authority of occupational licenses will be required to establish a process to expedite and prioritize licensing and certification for veterans and their spouses. • Requires boards and commissions to adopt a standard definition of veteran and service member to ensure that the State can properly identify and provide priority of service to all veterans and service members. • The Ohio Department of Veteran Services will provide critical workforce assistance to boards and commissions. DVS will also create a centralized website that provides state occupational licensing information to veterans and their spouses and provide additional support and assistance to Ohio’s boards and commissions serving veterans as necessary. House Bill 488
    • 18. OFFICE OF WORKFORCE TRANSFORMATION For more information, visit: www.workforce.ohio.gov Tracy Intihar tracy.intihar@governor.ohio.gov
    • 19. Education Initiatives in House Bill 472 Dr. Richard A. Ross Superintendent of Public Instruction
    • 20. Improve Education for 1.7 Million Students
    • 21. Strengthen Our Schools Third Grade Reading Guarantee A – F Report Card Straight A Fund
    • 22. Third Grade Reading Guarantee
    • 23. Focus on Students Provide help Offer new pathways House Bill 487
    • 24. OhioMeansJobs.com
    • 25. Pathways to a Diploma Dropout Prevention and Recovery Unique Pathways Career-Technical Education
    • 26. Pieces to the Dropout Puzzle
    • 27. Community Connectors
    • 28. Adult Pathways to a Diploma
    • 29. Partner with Board of Regents Start-up funds Enroll in 2015-2016 $2.5 Million
    • 30. Building on Our Success
    • 31. Working Together
    • 32. Lori Hellenthal County Operations Manager, Ohio Job & Family Services Directors' Association
    • 33. 2014 Mid-biennium Review OJFSDA April 3, 2014
    • 34. HB 486 – Workforce  Develop One Integrated State Workforce Plan  Common Workforce Performance Measures  Inventory of Education Programs
    • 35. HB 485 – Human Services  Create within ODJFS, an Office of Human Services Innovation  Make recommendations to the Governor: ◦ Coordinate services across all public assistance programs to help individuals find employment, succeed at work and stay out of poverty ◦ Revise incentives for public assistance programs to foster person-centered case management ◦ Standardize & automate eligibility determination policies and processes for public assistance programs.
    • 36. MBR Asks/Requests  Advocate funding for child welfare  All 88 counties leverage available capped federal child welfare funds  All 88 counties to work locally, using their own data to develop a plan to improve outcomes using a menu of evidence- based strategies with technical support from ODJFS  Low resourced “hardship counties” would receive limited supplemental funds to meet basic mandates
    • 37. APS  Historically low priority for state  $500,000 state wide invested  Counties provide $20 million per year
    • 38. QUESTIONS?
    • 39. Advocates for Ohio’s Future 510 East Mound Street, Suite 200 Columbus, OH 43215 www.advocatesforohio.org Will Petrik | 614-602-2464 wpetrik@advocatesforohio.org Gail Clendenin | 614-602-2463 gclendenin@advocatesforohio.org

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