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PMP Overview Presentation

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Overview Presentation on Project Management.

Overview Presentation on Project Management.

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  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI

PMP Overview Presentation PMP Overview Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • The Project StoryboardPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Background• Many organizations today have a newor renewed interest in projectmanagement• Computer hardware, software,networks, and the use ofinterdisciplinary and global work teamshave radically changed the workenvironment• The U.S. spends $2.3 trillion onprojects every year, or one-quarter ofits gross domestic product, and theworld as a whole spends nearly $10trillion of its $40.7 gross product onprojects of all kinds 3Trying to manage a project withoutproject management is like trying toplay a football game without a gameplan.K. TatePMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Success / Failure CriteriaProject SuccessProject FailurePMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Your Problems Solved• Every Project runs intosame kind of issues. But aproject manager withgood training can spotthem and quickly figureout the best solutions…A trained project managerA trained project managerhas great ideas on how tohas great ideas on how toestimate the tasks and putestimate the tasks and putthem in the right sequence tothem in the right sequence toget the projects done asget the projects done asquickly and effectively asquickly and effectively aspossible…possible…A trained project managerA trained project managerhas knowledge abouthas knowledge abouttechniques for planning andtechniques for planning andtracking the costs…tracking the costs…A trained project managerA trained project managerknows how to plan for andknows how to plan for andprotect against defects in theprotect against defects in theproject…project…PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Advantages of Using Formal ProjectManagement• Better control of financial, physical, and human resources• Improved customer relations• Shorter development times• Lower costs• Higher quality and increased reliability• Higher profit margins• Improved productivity• Better internal coordination• Higher worker morale (less stress)PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Management Institute (PMI®)• PMI® was founded in 1969 by five individuals who wanted tonetwork, share process information and discuss commonproject problems. It is now the leading membershipassociation for the project management profession with morethan 260,000 members in over 171 countries.– PMI is actively engaged in advocacy for the profession,setting professional standards, conducting research andproviding access to a wealth of information and resources.– PMI also promotes career and professional developmentand offers certification, networking and communityinvolvement opportunities.– PMIs Project Management Professional (PMP®) credentialis the most widely recognized and the only globalcertification in the profession.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • The Project Management FrameworkPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Session Objective• 1.2 What is a Project?• 1.3 What is Project Management?• 1.4 Relationship between Project Management, ProgramManagement, and Portfolio Management• 1.5 Project Management and Operations Management• 1.6 Roles of a Project Manager• 1.7 PMBoK® Guide• 1.8 Enterprise Environmental FactorsPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • What Is a Project?• A project is “a temporary endeavor undertaken to create aunique product, service, or result” (PMBOK® Guide, 4thEdition Section 1.2)• Operations is work done to sustain the business• Projects end when their objectives have been reached orthe project has been terminated• Projects can be large or small and take a short or long timeto complete• Projects exist within an organization and cannot operate asa closed system. They require input data from theorganization and beyond, and deliver capabilities back tothe organization.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Attributes• A project:– Has a unique purpose (e.g. create product, or service capability,or specific outcome of value)– Is temporary (definite Start and End Date)– Is developed using progressive elaboration• Specifications of the project are initially broad and then refined andmore detailed as the project progresses– Requires resources, often from various areas– Should have a primary customer or sponsor• The project sponsor usually provides the direction and funding forthe project– Involves uncertainty• Unclear objectives, difficult to estimate time to complete and cost,dependence on external factorsPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project FrameworkInputInitiator/SponsorerDeliverablesRecordsCustomer/End UserProcessAssetsInitiateInitiatePlanPlanExecuteExecuteControlControlCloseCloseProject ManagementMethodology21345PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Examples For A Project• Examples for a project:• Software development project to develop a new product.• Enhancement project to provide a new service.• Designing a new transportation vehicle.• Building Construction.• Running a campaign for political office.• Process ImprovementPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • What is Project Management?• Project management is “the application of knowledge, skills,tools and techniques to project activities to meet projectrequirements” (PMBOK® Guide, 4th Edition Section 1.3 )• Project Management is accomplished through theapplication and integration of the processes such as– Initiating– Planning– Executing– Monitoring and Controlling– ClosingPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Managing Projects• The Project Manager is the person responsible for accomplishingthe project objectives.• Managing a project includes:– Identifying requirements.– Establishing clear and achievable objectives.– Balancing the competing demand of quality, scope, time and cost.– Adapting the specifications, plans, and approach to the differentconcerns and expectations of the various stakeholders.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Managers• Project managers work with project sponsors, a project team,and other people involved in a project to meet project goals• Project Management Skills– General Business Management (consistently producing resultsexpected by stakeholders)– Leading (establishing direction, aligning resources, motivating)– Communicating (clear, unambiguous, and complete)– Negotiating (conferring with others to reach an agreement)– Problem Solving (definition and decision making)• Distinguish causes and symptoms• Identify viable solutions– Influencing Organization (understanding power and politics)PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Programs and Program Management• A Program is a group of related projects, managed in acoordinated way to obtain benefits not available frommanaging the projects individually• Most programs have elements of ongoing operations– Series of repetitive or cyclical undertakings• Management is coordinated because:– they may use the same resources,– the results of one project feed into another, or– they are parts of a larger "project that has been broken down tosmaller projects".• ADVANTAGES– Decreased risk– Economies of Scale– Improved ManagementPrograms may include elementsof related work outside of the scopeof the discrete projects in the program.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Portfolios and Portfolio Management• A Portfolio is a collection of projects or programs and otherwork that are grouped together to facilitate effectivemanagement of that work to meet strategic business objectives.The projects or programs in the portfolio may notnecessarily be interdependent or directly related.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Portfolios and Portfolio ManagementPortfolio ManagementProgram ManagementPortfolio - A suite of Programs andProjects managed to optimizeEnterprise ValueProgram - A structured groupingof projects designed to produceclearly identified business valueProject – A structured set ofactivities undertaken to deliver adefined capability based on anagreed schedule and budgetPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project, Program and PortfolioManagementProjects Programs PortfoliosScope Have defined objectives. Scopeis progressively elaborated.Programs have larger scopeand provide more significantbenefitsHave business scope thatchanges with strategicgoals of organizationChange Project Managers expectchange and implementprocesses to keep changemanaged and controlledProgram Manager mustexpect change from bothinside and outside theprogram and be prepared tomanage itPortfolio managerscontinually monitorchanges in the broadenvironmentPlanning Project Managers progressivelyelaborate high-levelinformation into detailed plansthroughout the project lifecycleProgram Managers developthe overall program plan andcreate high-level plans toguide detailed planning at thecomponent levelPortfolio Managerscreate and maintainnecessary processes andcommunication relativeto the aggregateportfolioPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Projects Programs PortfoliosManagement Project Managers managethe project team to meetthe project objectivesProgram Managers managethe program staff and theproject managers; theyprovide vision and overallleadershipPortfolio managers maymanage or coordinateportfolio managementstaffSuccess Success is measured byproduct and project quality,timeliness, costeffectiveness and degree ofcustomer satisfactionSuccess is measured by degreeto which program satisfies theneeds and benefits for which itwas undertakenSuccess is measured interms of aggregateperformance of portfoliocomponentsMonitoring Monitoring and Controllingof the work of producing theproject’s products, servicesor resultsProgram Managers monitorprogress of programcomponents to ensure overallgoals, schedules, budget andbenefits of the program will bemetPortfolio Managersmonitor aggregateperformance and valueindicatorsProject, Program and PortfolioManagementPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Management Office (PMO)• An organizational entity that centralizes and coordinates themanagement of projects.• Responsibility of a PMO can range from providing projectmanagement support functions to actually being responsible forthe direct management of a project. PMO can be:– Home for project managers: In some cases, maintain a centralized officefrom which project managers are loaned out to work on projects.– Project management software tools: Select and maintain projectmanagement tools for use by employees. Also manage the ProjectManagement Knowledge base.– Portfolio management: Establish a staff of program managers who canmanage multiple projects that are related, such as infrastructuretechnologies, desktop applications and so on, and allocate resourcesaccordingly.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Functions of a PMO• A PMO performs a number of functions that may include but arenot limited to:– Managing shared resources across projects– Project Management Process/Methodology: Develop and implement aconsistent and standardized process.– Coaching, mentoring, training and oversight– Developing and managing project policies, procedures, templates and othershared documentation (Organizational Process Assets)– Monitoring compliance with PM standards, policies, procedures and templates– Manage the interdependencies between projects– Help provide resources– Terminate projects– Help gather lessons learned and make them available to other projects– Provide templates– Provide guidance– Provide enterprise project management software– Be more heavily involved during project initiating than later in the project.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Differences between a Project Managersand PMO• Project manager focuses on the specified project objectives ,while the PMO manages major program scope changes whichmay be seen as potential opportunities to better achievebusiness objectives• The project manager controls the assigned project resourcesto best meet project objectives while the PMO optimizes theuse of shared organizational resources across all the projectsPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • • Projects are frequently divided into more manageablecomponents or subprojects.– Subproject are often contracted to an external enterprise or toanother functional unit in the performing organization.– Sub projects can be referred to as projects and managed as such.SubprojectsPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • ResponsibilitiesPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • The Triple Constraint of ProjectManagement• Successful projectmanagement meansmeeting all three goals(scope, time, and cost) –and satisfying theproject’s sponsor!• However, quality is thequadruple constraint• Increased Scope = increased time +increased cost• Tight Time = increased costs +reduced scope• Tight Budget = increased time +reduced scope.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Triple Constraint scenarioPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Organizational / Managerial Approach• Management by Project (MBP)– Project management is the discipline of planning, organizing, andmanaging resources to bring about the successful completion ofspecific project goals and objectives. It is sometimes conflated withprogram management, however technically a program is actually ahigher level construct: a group of related and somehowinterdependent projectsPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Organizational / Managerial Approach• Management by Objectives (MBO) is a process of agreeingupon objectives within an organization so that managementand employees agree to the objectives and understand whatthey are in the organization.• The essence of MBO is participative goal setting, choosingcourse of actions and decision making. An important part of theMBO is the measurement and the comparison of theemployee’s actual performance with the standards set. Ideally,when employees themselves have been involved with the goalsetting and the choosing the course of action to be followed bythem, they are more likely to fulfill their responsibilitiesPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMBoK®• Twenty years ago, PMI volunteers sat down to distill theProject management body of knowledge. This eventuallybecame the PMBOK® Guide, now considered one of the mostessential tools in the profession and is the de facto globalstandard for the industry.• The PMBoK® Guide identifies the subset of the ProjectManagement Body of Knowledge generally recognized as goodpractice.• It also provides and promotes a common vocabulary withinthe PMP® for discussing, writing, applying, projectmanagement concepts– Updates occur on a four-year cycle to ensure PMIs commitment to continually improveand revise the information contained in this essential reference manual. The currentedition is the fourth.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • • “Generally Recognized” means the knowledge and practicesdescribed are applicable to most projects, most of the time andthere are consensus about their value and usefulness.• “Good Practice” means there is general agreement that theapplication of these skills, tools, and techniques can enhancethe chance of success over wide range of projects.PMBoK ® Guide – Key ConceptPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • PMBoK® Guide - Areas of ExpertiseGenerally accepted as Good Practice1. Project life cycle definition2. Five project management process3. Nine Knowledge areas•Functional departments & supporting disciplines•Technical elements•Management specialization•Industry Groups•Cultural and social environment•International and political environment•Physical environmentPlanning, Organizing, Staffing,Executing & ControllingEffective communicationInfluencing the organizationLeadershipMotivationNegotiating and conflict managementProblem solvingPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Life Cycle and OrganizationPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Session Objective• Product & Project Life cycle• 2.1 The Project Life Cycle - Overview• 2.2 Projects vs. Operational Work• 2.3 Project Stakeholders• 2.3 Organizational Influences on Project ManagementPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Product and Project LifecyclePMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • 2.1 The Project Life Cycle• All projects are divided into phases, and all projects, large orsmall, have a similar life cycle structure.• Project Phases are marked by the completion of a deliverable– Tangible, verifiable work product– Review of deliverables and approval/denial are “phase exits, stage gates,or kill points”• Phases are collected into the Project Life Cycle– Set of defined work procedures to establish management control• At a minimum, project will have a beginning or initiation phase,an intermediate phase or phases, and an ending phase.• All the collective phases the project progresses through inconcert are called the project life cycle.Construction: Feasibility-> Planning -> Design -> Production -> Turnover -> StartupIT Project: Requirement -> Design -> Develop-> Test -> ImplementPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Phase – Cotd…• Project phases evolve through the life cycle in a series of phasessequences called handoffs, or technical transfers. The end ofone phase sequence may mark the beginning of the next.• Projects are usually divided into several project phases toimprove management control.• Project Life Cycle defines:– Technical work performed in each phase– Who is involved in each phase• Project Phases can overlap – “Fast Tracking”• Common Characteristics of Project Life Cycles:– Cost and Staffing levels are low at start and move higher towards the end– Probability of successfully completing project is low at beginning, highertowards the end as project continues– Stakeholder influence is high at the beginning and progressively lowers asproject continuesThe completion of one phase does not automaticallysignals the beginning of next phase.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • More on Project Phases• In early phases of a project life cycle:– Resource needs are usually lowest– The level of uncertainty (risk) is highest– Project stakeholders have the greatestopportunity to influence the project• In middle phases of a project life cycle:– The certainty of completing a project improves– More resources are needed– Monetary Spending is highest in the middlephase• The final phase of a project life cyclefocuses on:– Ensuring that project requirements were met– The sponsor approves completion of theprojectRisksPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Phase-to-Phase RelationshipsThere are three basic types of phase – to –phase relationships :A Sequential relationship : where a phase can only start once the previousphase is completeAn Overlapping relationship : where the phase starts prior to completion ofthe previous one (Fastracking ). Overlapping phase may increase riskand can result in rework .An Iterative relationship : where only one phase is planned at any giventime and the planning for the next is carried out as work progresses onthe current phase and deliverablesPhase to Phase relationPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Phase Completion• You will recognize phase completion because each phase has aspecific deliverable, or multiple deliverables, that marks the endof the phase.A deliverable is an output that must be produced,reviewed, and approved to bring the phase or project to completion.Deliverables are tangible and can be measured and easily proved.A Guide to the PMBOK states that phase ending reviews are also knownby other names: Phase Exits, Phase Gates, or Kill Points.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • 2.2 Project vs. Operational Work• Attains its objectives and terminates• Create own character, organization, and goals• Catalyst for change• Unique product or services• Heterogeneous teams• Definite Start and end dateProjects• Producing a News letter• Writing and publishing a book• Implementing a LAN• Hiring a sales man• Arrange for a conference• Opening for a new shop• Arranging a Music ConcertExamples•Sustains the business• Semi-permanent charter, organization, andgoals• Maintain status quo• Standard product or services• Homogeneous teams• OngoingOperations• Responding to customers requests• Writing a letter to a Prospect• Hooking up a Printer to a computer• Meeting with an employee• Attending a conference• Running a shop• Writing a progress update memoExamplesPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • 2.3 Projects and Strategic Planning• Projects are means of organizing activities that cannot beaddressed within the organizations normal operational limits.• Projects are typically authorized as a result of one or more ofthe following strategic considerations:– A Market Demand & Organizational Need– A Customer Request– A Technological Advancement– A Legal RequirementPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • 2.4 Project Stakeholders• A stakeholder is someone whose interest may bepositively or negatively impacted by the project.• They are individual or organization who are activelyinvolved in the project:– Often have conflicting expectations and objectives– In general, differences should be resolved in favor of thecustomer – individual(s) or organization(s) that will use theoutcome of the project– Stakeholder management is a proactive task• Project Mangers must determine all stakeholders and incorporatetheir needs into the projectPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Key StakeholdersSponsor Person or group that provides thefinancial resources for the projectPortfolio Managers/Portfolio Review Board Managers responsible for the high-levelgovernance of a collection of projects orprogramsProgram Managers Managers responsible for managingrelated projects in a coordinated way toobtain benefits and control not availablefrom managing them individuallyProject Management Office It has direct or indirect responsibility forthe outcome of the projectProject Managers Manages the ProjectProject team members Group performing the project’s workFunctional (Department/Unit) Managers Key individuals playing a managementrole within a functional area of thebusinessOperations Management Individuals who have a managementrole in a core business areaKey StakeholderPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Key StakeholdersInfluencers Due to an individuals position caninfluence positively or negativelySellers/Business Partners External companies that enter intoa contractCustomer Purchases the product or serviceUser Uses the product or servicesPerforming Organization Whose employees are mostdirectly involved in doing theproject’s workKey StakeholderPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Relationship between Stakeholders andthe Project Page 24CCPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • What we do with the stakeholder?• Identify ALL of them• Determine ALL of theirrequirements• Determine theirexpectations• Communicate with them• Manage their influencePMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • • Organizational Culturestructure and Process• Government or IndustrialStandard• Resources and Capabilities• Company WorkAuthorization systems• Market condition• Stakeholder Risk Tolerance• Political ClimateEnterprise Environmental Factors• Enterprise Environmental Factors (EEF) refers to both internal and externalfactors that surround or influence a project success. It may enhance orconstraint project management options. They are considered as inputs tomost of the planning processes. The EEF could include• Organization establishedcommunication channels• Commercial Database(Standardized cost,estimation data, riskdatabase)• Project ManagementInformation SystemPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Management Context• Organizational Systems: Project based vs. Non-ProjectBased– Project Based – derive revenues from performing projectsfor others (consultants, contractors),”management byprojects”– Non-Project Based – seldom have management systemsdesigned to support project needs (manufacturing,financial services)PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Organizational Influence on ProjectManagement• Projects are typically part of an organization that is larger thanthe project.• The maturity of the organization with respect to its projectmanagement system, culture, style, organizational structureand project management office can also influence the project.– Organizational Systems– Organizational Cultures and Styles– Organizational StructurePMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Organization Culture, Style andStructure• These cultures are reflected in numerous factors:– Shared values, norms, beliefs, and expectations– Policies and procedures– View of authority relationships– Work ethics and work hours• The structure of the performing organization often constraintsthe availability of resources in a spectrum from Functional toProjectized, with a variety of matrix structure in between.– Entrepreneurial firms more likely to adopt highly participativeProject Manager – accept higher risk/reward– Hierarchical firms less likely to adopt participative Project Manager– take fewer risksPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Functional Organization• The organization is grouped by areas of specialization withindifferent functional areas.• Projects generally occur within a single department.• Information required from other department will be routed throughdepartmental heads.• Team members complete project work in addition to normaldepartment work.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • • The entire company is organized by projects.• The project manager has control of projects.• Personnel are assigned and report to a project manager.• Team members complete only project work and when its overthey dont have HOME.• Communication generally occurs only within the project.Projectized OrganizationPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Matrix Organization• Two Bosses• Team members reports to Project Manager and Functional Manager• Team members do project work in addition to normal departmental work• Power rests with functional manager• Project Manager plays a role of:– Project Expediter: Cannot take decision. Staff assistant and Communication coordinator.– Project Coordinator: Similar to Project Expeditor except has some power to take decision.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Balanced Matrix• Two Bosses• Team members reports to Project Manager and FunctionalManager• Team members do project work in addition to normaldepartmental work• Power is shared between the functional and project managerPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Strong Matrix• Power rests with the Project ManagerPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • • A composite organization is a blend of multiple organizationtypes.Composite OrganizationPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Organization Structure Influence onProjectPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Advantage and DisadvantagePMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Organization MagnetsMatrix OrganizationProjectized OrganizationFunctional OrganizationTeams are organized aroundprojectsProject Managers (PM)estimate and track budgetand scheduleProject Managers (PM) choosethe team members, and releasethem when the project is overPMs spend half their timedoing admin tasksPMs need to clear majordecisions with departmentmanagerTeams are organized aroundprojectsProject Managers (PM)estimate and track budgetand schedulePMs need to clear majordecisions with departmentmanagerProject Managers (PM)choose the team members,and release them when theproject is overPMs don’t set the budgetPMs spend half their timedoing admin tasksPM is the project coordinatorPM is the projectcoordinatorTeams have two bossesTeams have two bossesTeams work on both projectand functional activitiesTeams work on both projectand functional activitiesPMs don’t set the budgetPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Management ProcessesPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Anatomy of a ProcessThink of each process as a littlemachine. It takes inputs –information used in a project – andturns them into outputs:documents, deliverables anddecisions. Every single process hasinputs, tools and techniquesthat are used to do the work, andoutputs.These processes are meant to workon ANY type of project be it large,medium or small. Sometimes thatmeans a lot of processes – but italso means that what you arelearning here will work on all yourprojects.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • • The Project Processes are performed by the project team andgenerally fall in one of the below major categories– Project management processes ensure the effective flow of theproject throughout its existence. These processes encompass thetools and techniques involved in applying the skills and capabilitiesdescribed in the Knowledge Areas– Product oriented processes specify and create the projectsproduct. Product-oriented processes are typically defined by theproject life cycle and vary by application area. The scope of theproject cannot be defined without some basic understanding ofhow to create the specified product.Project Management ProcessPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • • Project Management Processes are grouped into five categories;known as Project Management Process Groups:– Initiation Process Group: Those processes performed to define a new project or a newphase of an existing project by obtaining authorization to start the project or phase.– Planning Process Group: Those processes required to establish the scope of theproject, refine the objectives, define the course of action to attain the objectives that theproject was undertaken to achieve– Execution Process Group: Those processes performed to complete the work definedin the project management plan to satisfy the project specification– Monitoring and Controlling process group: Those processes required to track,review, regulate the progress and performance of the project; identify any areas inwhich changes to the plan are required; and initiate the corresponding change .– Closing Process Group: Those processes performed to finalize all activities across allProcess groups to formally close the project or phaseProject Management Process GroupPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Process Groups..• The process groups are linked by the results they produce - theresult or outcome of one becomes an input to another.PlanningDefine and refine objectives.Select best alternative.ClosingFormalize acceptance andbring project/phase to an end.InitiationAuthorizing the project orPhaseExecutingCoordinating people andother resources to carry outplan.ControllingMonitor, measure progress,identifyvariance and take corrective.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Process MagnetsWithin each Process Group are several individual processes, which is how you actually do the work onyour project. Every project can be broken down into 44 processes.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Process Groups...• Overlap of Process Groups in a Phase:• The PM process groups are not discrete, one-time events; they are overlapping activitieswhich occur at varying levels of intensity throughout each phase of the project• Interaction Between Phases:• The process group interactions also cross phases such as closing of one phase provides aninput to initiating the next• Core Processes:• Have clear dependencies that require them to be performed in essentially the same orderon most projects.• Facilitating Processes:• Interactions among the other processes are more depending on the nature of the project.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Knowledge Areas• The processgroups help youorganize theprocesses by thekind of workyou do.• The knowledgeareas help youorganize by thesubject matteryou’re dealingwith.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Management Knowledge AreaPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Knowledge Area MagnetsPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Process Area and Process GroupinteractionInitiating Planning ExecutingMonitoring& ControllingClosingIntegrationManagementScopeManagementCostManagementTimeManagementQualityManagementHuman ResourceManagementCommunicationManagementRiskManagementProcurementManagement* Project Charter * Develop ProjectManagement Plan* Direct and ManageProject Execution* M & C Project work* Integrated Change Control* Close Project or phase* Requirement Collection* Scope Definition* Create WBS* Scope Verification* Scope Control* Activity Definition* Activity Sequencing* Estimate-Effort, Resource* Schedule Development* Schedule Control* Cost Estimation* Cost Budgeting* Cost Control* Quality Planning * Perform QualityAssurance* Perform Quality Control* Human Resource Planning * Acquire Project Team* Develop Project Team* Manage Project Team* Communication Planning * Info distribution* Manage Stakeholderexpectation* Performance Reporting* Risk Planning* Risk Identification* Quantitative Analysis* Response Planning* Risk M & C* Plan Procurement* Conduct Procurement * Administration ofProcurement* Procurement Closure* Identify StakeholderPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • 9 Knowledge Areas* Defining contract and choosing a contractorto do work in your project* Keeping everybody working towards thesame goal and dealing with changes* Budgeting the project and tracking themoney being spent.* Getting the people required for the projectand keeping them motivated* Planning for things that could happen (+veor –ve) and dealing with them when they do.* Making sure you develop the right productand that you do it as effectively as possible* Figuring out who should talk to whom tokeep everybody in the loop on your project* Estimating the time it will take to completeyour project and making sure you meet thedeadline you set*Defining the task that will (and will not) bePMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Customizing Process Interactions• The processes identified and the interactions described in the Process Interactions sectionmeet the test of general acceptance - they apply to most projects most of the time.• However, not all of the processes will be needed on all projects, and not all of the interactionswill apply to all projects• Project management team should identify and manage all the processes that are needed toensure a successful projectPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Management System• The project management system is the set of tools, techniques,methodologies, resources, and procedures used to manage aproject.• If a PMO exists in the performing organization, one of thefunctions of the PMO would typically be to manage the projectmanagement system, in order to ensure consistency inapplication and continuity on the various projects beingperformed.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • The Project Management Certification ExamPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Types of Questions in Exam• Situational Questions• Questions with two or more right answers• Questions with extraneous information• Out of the blue questions• Questions where understanding is important• Questions with new approach to known topic.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Format of the PMP Exam• Computer based exam conducted in Prometric centers.• 200 multiple choice questions to be answered within 4 hours.• Exam is preceded by a 15-minute computer tutorial on the format of the exam.• Each question has exactly one correct answer. Most people find four hours to be more thansufficient for the exam.• Out of these 200 questions, 25 questions are research questions. These are randomly placedthroughout the exam. These questions are not evaluated while computing exam results. Youwill only be evaluated on the basis of 175 questions.• On clicking the final submission button, the system will compute the results immediatelyand provide you with the Pass or Fail message. Do not forget to collect the result-sheet fromthe Examination center invigilator/coordinator• To pass the PMP examination, you must answer a minimum of 106 of the 175 scoredquestions correctly. Immediately on completion of the exam, the Prometric center will giveyou the provisional mark-sheet. The mark-sheet will give the breakup of the score byProcess Area.• There is no negative marking in the exam. Unanswered questions are treated as wrongquestions.• After clearing the exam, you will receive the PMP certificate by mail within 2 months.Examination scores are confidential.PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Distribution of Questions by ProcessGroup in the PMP ExamTopics Percentage of QuestionsInitiation 11%Planning 23%Executing 27%Monitoring & Controlling 21%Closing 9%Professional & SocialResponsibility9%PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Project Management Ethics• Ethics, loosely defined, is a set of principles that guide ourdecision making based on personal values of what is “right”and “wrong”• Project managers often face ethical dilemmas• In order to earn PMP® certification, applicants must agree toPMI’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct• Several questions on the PMP® exam are related toprofessional responsibility, including ethics80PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Question & AnswerPMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI
  • Thank You !!!!PMP & PMBOK are registered trademarks of PMI