Halal for the Food & Chemical Industry 2012
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Halal for the Food & Chemical Industry 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. HALAL REQUIREMENTS forFOOD AND CHEMICAL INDUSTRY By DR. MOHAMED SADEK Chairman HALAL Food Council of Europe HFCE 1
  • 2. Key Terminology Halalmeans permissible and lawful Haram means prohibited Mashbooh means doubtful Makrooh means disliked or detested Zabiha means slaughtered by Muslim HFCE 2
  • 3. General Guidelines  Only ALLAH (GOD) can ordain what is Halal and what is haram.  All foods are Halal except those ordained as haram.  Haram foods include those containing pork, alcohol, blood, dead animals, and animals slaughtered reciting a name other than ALLAH. HFCE 3
  • 4. Requirements for Meat & Poultry  Animals must be of the Halal species  Animals and birds to be slaughtered by sane Muslim  Complete removal of blood from the carcass  Humane handling to be practiced  Stunning permitted provided it is not fatal HFCE 4
  • 5. Requirements for Fish & Seafood  Fish with scales, universally accepted  Fish without scales not accepted by Some Groups  Shellfish and crustaceans accepted by most but detested by some groups HFCE 5
  • 6. Requirements for Eggs & Dairy Products  Milk and eggs of all acceptable animal species are permitted  Restrictions on: –  Enzymes from animals –  Emulsifiers of animal origin –  Other functional ingredients HFCE 6
  • 7. Requirements for Vegetable Products  Fermented intoxicating materials prohibited, e.g., –  Ethyl Alcohol, Alcoholic Drinks –  Drugs/intoxicants [not medicine] HFCE 7
  • 8. Food Ingredients  All vegetable ingredients are Halal except intoxicating ones  Animal derived ingredients should be from animals slaughtered by Muslims or from fish HFCE 8
  • 9. Questionable Ingredients  Gelatin:Pork, Beef, Fish  Glycerin/glycerol  Emulsifiers: Animal, Vegetable  Enzymes: Animal, Microbial, Biotech  Dairy Ingredients, whey, cheese  Ethyl Alcohol, Alcoholic Drinks  Animal Protein/Fat  Flavorings and Compound Mixtures HFCE 9
  • 10. Questionable Ingredients  Gelatin –  No distinction on the label for the source of animal, so any product containing gelatin is Haram or suspected.  Glycerin –  No distinction on the label for source of glycerin (animal or vegetable) so any product containing glycerin is also suspected. HFCE 10
  • 11. Questionable Ingredients  Emulsifiers: –  C o m m e r c i a l l y a v a i l a b l e m o n o a n d diglycerides may be manufactured from vegetable oil, beef fat or lard. –  If not labeled as vegetable, then product is considered suspected. HFCE 11
  • 12. Questionable Ingredients  Enzymes: –  The source can be animal, plant or microbial. Normally the label does not make any distinction.  Whey and Other Dairy Ingredients: –  Depends on the enzyme used. Normally the label does not make any distinction, so products with emulsifiers are Haram or suspected. HFCE 12
  • 13. Questionable Ingredients  Alcohol: –  Alcohol (intoxicants) is prohibited in Islam. –  There is no allowance for added alcoholic drinks in food, cooking or formulations. –  Alcohol naturally present e.g. fruit essences –  Alcohol used for technical reasons, e.g. Extraction of flavors like vanilla. HFCE 13
  • 14. GMO s Biotechnology  Chemicals are acceptable  Enzymes are acceptable  Transgenic Foods  Plant to plant gene transfer is ok  Animal to plant gene transfer ?  Animal to animal gene transfer ?  New Species ? HFCE 14
  • 15. Sanitation & X-Contamination  Allequipment must be clean per visual inspection –  Clean up after non Halal Ingredients production  All Halal products must be segregated to avoid cross-contamination HFCE 15
  • 16. MARKETING OPPORTUNITIES 1.4 Billion Muslims in the World South Asia 400 million South East Asia 250 million Middle East 200 million Asia 200 million Africa 200 million Europe 18 million North America 8 million HFCE 16
  • 17. HALAL MARKET  Halal,ethnic & specialty stores  Supermarket chains  Food Service –  Universities, schools (public and private) and airlines HFCE 17
  • 18. The Importance of Halal Certification Background  Pioneering countries in requesting Halal certificates from the U.S.A. –  Singapore –  Malaysia –  Indonesia –  Saudi Arabia The products ranged from frozen meat and poultry to processed meat and food items for food service, A&W, Mc Donald s, Others. 18 IFCE
  • 19. The Importance of Halal Certification Background  Halal regulations are almost 1400 years old.  For 1350 years there was no concept of Halal certification on paper.  Halal meat was always prepared by Muslims and was usually sold by Muslims.  Halal foods were made from scratch at home.  There was no use of complex processed ingredients. HFCE 19
  • 20. The Importance of Halal Certification Halal ActivityPercentages of the requests for HalalCertificates for various countries. Percentage of Halal Requests per Country Indonesia 55% USA 10% Singapore 5% Malaysia Other 20% 10% HFCE 20
  • 21. HFCE Halal Certification  Technical content/ food technologists –  A group of food technologists to discuss and recommend any evolving technical issues, and make recommendations to the Shura committee. –  Auditors understand the industry and design audits to complement the company personnel. –  We speak the language of the industry. HFCE 21
  • 22. HFCE Halal Certification  Resolvingissues through Shura. Halal is a matter of faith and commitment. –  Religious Scholars (Shura Committee) upon recommendation from the Technical Committee determine new guidelines. –  We are expanding both Technical and Religious Committees to include diverse scholars. HFCE 22
  • 23. HFCE Guidelines for Halal Certification  1.0-Legal obligations of the parties.  1.1-An application is made to HFCE in original and signed by the company s authorized person.  1.2-A confidential contract is agreed to, which stipulates three types of visits to the facility for audit and inspection. HFCE 23
  • 24. HFCE Guidelines for Halal Certification  1.21-an initial and subsequent yearly inspection; Expenses for which are paid for by the company.  1.22-A surprise visit is allowed whenever the plant is open for business, generally one visit per year. The expenses are not billed to the company. HFCE 24
  • 25. HFCE Guidelines for Halal Certification  1.23-For the production of critical ingredients, such as gelatin or meat powders, there will be an on site inspection paid for by the company. Generally, companies are requested to have halal certificate for critical ingredients being used in the certifiable product. –  Critical Ingredients include: –  Amino Acids –  Cheese and its byproducts –  Chemicals derived from fats –  Colorings –  Enzymes –  Extracts –  Gelatin (IFANCA HC only) –  Glycerin/glycerol –  Ingredients processed with enzymes –  Natural and artificial flavorings –  Premixes / blends –  Vitamins (with standardizing ingredients of A and D) IFCE 25
  • 26. HFCE Guidelines for Halal Certification  2.0-Reviewof the facility and ingredients.  2.1-Informationreceived from the auditor is reviewed to determine the chance of cross-contamination, and then standard operating procedures are co- developed with the company. HFCE 26
  • 27. HFCE Guidelines for Halal Certification  2.2-company provides a list of all ingredients and suppliers. Ingredients are classified into categories, according to their level of doubt about non-conformity to the Halal requirements. [See H1-H9 criteria].  2.3-suppliers are asked to fill out Halal questionnaires for each ingredient considered doubtful. HFCE 27
  • 28. HFCE Guidelines for Halal Certification  2.4-ingredient conformation is reviewed and reclassified and the company may only use approved ingredients in Halal formulations.  2.41-H1 ingredients-may be used without restriction.  2.42-H2 ingredients may be used if all answers in the questionnaire are no. IFCE 28
  • 29. HFCE Guidelines for Halal Certification  2.43-if the answer to any of the questions is yes , the supplier is asked for a Halal certificate or further information to establish the status. An ingredient that must have a general Halal certificate is designated H3 and an ingredient which requires a batch certificate, such as gelatin containing ingredients, is classified H5.  2.44-Halal certified ingredients with a general yearly certificates are designated H4. HFCE 29
  • 30. HFCE Guidelines for Halal Certification  2.45-all food ingredients in the above classes H1 through H5 must have alcohol level less than 0.5%. All ingredients containing alcohol in the amount of 0.5% or higher that do not contain animal derived material are classified as H6, e.g., Natural vanilla flavor which by regulation contains 35% alcohol. HFCE does not certify any ingredient containing 0.5% or more alcohol. HFCE 30
  • 31. HFCEGuidelines for Halal CertificationHFCE would certify a food ingredient ifthe alcohol level is less than 0.5%. Thecontrol point for the alcohol-containingingredients is at the finished productlevel, where the alcohol level must be lessthan 0.1% in the consumer product. HFCE 31
  • 32. HFCE Guidelines for Halal Certification  2.46-ingredients classified as H9 are from Haram sources and are not permitted to be used in and around Halal products where chance of cross-contamination exists.  2.47-HFCE maintains a database of approved ingredients for each company and its suppliers. In certain cases where a company manages a common global database, HFCE may have direct access to its database. HFCE 32
  • 33. HFCE Guidelines for Halal Certification  3.0-issuance of a Halal certificate.  3.1-after the company understands the above guidelines; The formula is submitted to HFCE for review with assurance that the product meets the established guidelines. The company also submits the amount of alcohol present in each formulation. Based on this information HFCE decides whether to issue the certificate or have the company modify the formula and resubmit it. HFCE 33
  • 34. HFCE Importance of Halal Certification to the Consumer  It clears the doubt.  It saves time from reading the labels.  Peace of mind and satisfaction. HFCE 34
  • 35. Kosher vs Halal Kosher HalalPork Prohibited ProhibitedRuminants Slaughtered by Slaughtered by& Poultry a Jewish person a MuslimRestrictions Hind quarters not used Whole carcass used Salting and soaking No salting requiredBlessing Blessing before entering Blessing on each animal slaughtering area. while slaughtering. Not on each animal HFCE 35
  • 36. Kosher vs Halal Kosher HalalSlaughter By Hand Mandated Preferred Mechanical Not accepted Accepted Stunning Not accepted AcceptedBlood Prohibited ProhibitedGelatin: Blessed From Kosher Animals From Halal Animals Dry Bones May Be Halal Bones Only Fish Kosher Fish Only Any Fish Pork May Be NO IFCE 36
  • 37. Kosher vs Halal Kosher HalalEnzymes Microbial Accepted Accepted Biotech Accepted Accepted Animal Kosher Slaughtered(?) Halal slaughtered(?) Porcine No(?) NoAlcohol Accepted Not Permitted (Source restrictions)Fish With Scales Only All Fish AcceptedSeafood Not Accepted Varying Degrees of Acceptance IFCE 37
  • 38. Kosher vs Halal Kosher HalalCombining BIG Problem Not an IssueMeat & DairySanitation of Cleaning CleaningEquipment Kosherization Ritual Cleansing Idle Period if heat No Idle Period treatment is involvedSpecial Restrictions during Same Rules Year-Occasions Passover round IFCE 38
  • 39. Kosher vs Halal Kosher HalalMarket Size 6 million U.S. Jews 8 million U.S. Muslims LT 1/2 Observe Kosher Almost All Observe Halal Worldwide 14 million Worldwide 1400 million Jews Muslims ?% Observe Kosher Almost 100% Observe Halal IFCE 39
  • 40. What is HFCE? Halal Food Council of Europe  Not for Profit Technical Islamic Organization  Supervising production of Halal foods.  Certifying production of Halal foods.  Finding solutions for new challenges.  Publishing relevant information.  Consulting with Islamic scholars on the practical issues facing Muslims in selecting food products. HFCE 40
  • 41. Halal Food Approval Process HFCE 41
  • 42. Halal Food Approval Process Application Presentation re: Halal Program Review Process Review Facility Audit -----Sanitaion Review RM Procedures Production Procedures Labelling Review Review Meeting Physical AuditRecommendations Changes Approval HFCE 42
  • 43. Halal Food Approval Process Product Process Production Batch Total Records to IFCE Yearly Certificate Review Batch Certificate HFCE 43
  • 44. Halal Food Approval Process Monitoring Process Frequency Audits I RM Receipts Invoice Checks Production Records RM where used Same N.H. Ingredients Separate RM # for Halal Packaging P.O. Control HFCE 44
  • 45. HFCE Certified Halal Logo HFCE 45
  • 46. Halal Symbols HFCE 46
  • 47. ALCOHOL Flavor Seasoning WINE Breast Feed Suplement BEVERAGE FOR COOKING Antioxidant Bread Improver Cosmetics L-Cystein LIQUEUR PLACENTA MEDICINE in drink (coctail) HAIR Anti Ageing KHAMR FETUS (EMBRYO) HUMAN ORGANS LIQUEUR in cake PIG see the detailed FERMENTATION MEDIA Pig Chart SAUSAGES BLOOD CARRION PASTE Animal Without Slaughtering Animal Slaughtered not according to Islamic Law Enzyme Boullion Seasoning CHICKEN DUCK GOAT LAMB BEEF Meat Extract Seasoning FlavorCooking / Culinary Duck Feather Fat Cooking / Culinary Bone Hide Meat Amino Acid Activated Bone Marrow Gelatine Cooking L-Cystein Tallow Carbon Gelatine Flavor Seasoning Bread Improver Cooking Oil Cooking / Culinary 47
  • 48. PIG & ITS DERIVATIVES YOGHURT MARSHMALLOW SOFT CANDY CREAMER JELLY ICE CREAM MARGARINE ICE CREAM GELATINE CAPSULES CREAM EMULSIFIER TOOTH PASTE FLAVOR SOUP SEASONING MONO& GLYCERINE COSMETIC DIGLYCERIDA BAKERY LIPSTICK BISCUIT COLLAGEN SOAP FAT DERIVATIVES BROTH COSMETIC SHORTENING SKIN LEATHER SAUSAGE FLAVOR & CASSING TEXTURIZER SEASONING POWDER PORK FAT INTESTINE BACON (Lard) PASTA BURGER MEAT MEAT FLOSS INNARDS PANCREASBREAD IMPROVER ENZYM INSULIN FLAVOR CYSTEIN TOOTH BRUSH HAIR RENNET BRUSH CHEESE ACTIVATED CARBON BONE BLOOD THE ASSESSMENT INSTITUTE REFINED OIL & FERMENTATION FOR FOODS DRUGS AND COSMETICS, MEDIA INDONESIAN COUNCIL OF ULAMA (LPPOM MUI) WATER MEDICINE MUI Building, 3 Floor, Jl. Menteng Bogor - Indonesia SAUSAGE +62 0251 8662 931 ; +62 0251 8358 748 www.halalmui.org or email: info@halalmui.org MICROBIAL PRODUCTS 48