AEC 2015: Philippines Industry Perspective
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AEC 2015: Philippines Industry Perspective

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The Impact of ASEAN Economic Community 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry: A Philippines Food Industry Perspective. 47-page slide

The Impact of ASEAN Economic Community 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry: A Philippines Food Industry Perspective. 47-page slide

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    AEC 2015: Philippines Industry Perspective AEC 2015: Philippines Industry Perspective Presentation Transcript

    • INDUSTRYPERSPECTIVES − AEC 2015 “Impact to the Food Industry: Regulations; Source of Raw Materials; Labor and Technology;Government’s Policy and Plan; and Market Opportunities and Challenges”
    • INDUSTRYPERSPECTIVES − AEC 2015 A Philippines Food Industry Perspective Presented by: Mr. Roberto C. AmoresPresident, Philippine Food Processors and Exporters Organization, Inc. President/CEO, Hi-Las Marketing CorporationAt the Conference on “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry” September 21, 2011, QNSCC, Bangkok-Thailand
    • INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES − AEC 2015INTRODUCTION Our profound thanks to the mainhosts of this conference- the UBMAsia (Thailand) Co Ltd. and theNational Food Institute of Thailand. Conference on the Impact of AEC2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry inco-location with Food IngredientsASIA 2011 - very timely and relevant. The wonderful reception, hospitalityand efficiency of arrangements givefurther testimony to Thailand’s fastgrowing economy and its full supportto the ASEAN Economic Community2015. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES − AEC 2015 As the President of the PhilippineFood Processors and ExportersOrganization, Inc. (Philfoodex), Irepresent more than 250 member-companies directly engaged in foodmanufacturing and exporting. They are, together with more than11,000 small and medium sized foodprocessors including those engagedin fruits and beverages in thePhilippines, eagerly await with mixedanticipations the full implementationof the AEC 2015. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES − AEC 2015 PRESENTAT ION The presentation is divided in three parts:First Part: Overview of the structure and recent performanceof Philippine Food Industry sector.Second Part: The Impact of AEC 2015.Third Part: How the Philippines’ and ASEAN Food Industrycan benefit from the AEC 2015. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • PART 1The Philippine Agro-Food Industry
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry“The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry Philippine agricultureincluding forestry and fishery-dominant sectors in theeconomy. 70% of total population of101 million (est. 2011), are inrural areas . Two-thirds of thispopulation depends on farmingfor their livelihood. One-half of the labor forceengaged in agriculturalactivities. Thus, high priority isgiven in transformingagriculture into a modern,dynamic and competitive sector. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry The Philippines is the world’s 3rdlargest exporter of bananas, 7th largestmango exporter, and the largestpineapple producer in the world. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry Cavendish banana is thebenchmark export variety. The keyglobal banana exporters are Ecuador(no.1) followed by Costa Rica(no.2).Leading mango exporters are India,Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Pakistan,Ecuador and the Philippines in thatorder. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry Philippines is the largest coconutoil exporter in the world supplying64% of the world’s coconut oilrequirement despite that Indonesia isnow the largest producer of coconutproducer but exports less of itsproducts to the rest of the world tosatisfy its expanding domesticmarket. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food IndustryPhilippine Food Industry Structure The Philippine food industry is composed of the following: “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry Philippine Exports of Food Products, 2010 FOB Value in Million US $ M a rin e / Aqu a cu ltu re 30% P ro ce ssed Fo o d B e vera ges 48% 2% Fre sh Fo o d 20% Total PH Exports, US $ 2,113.90Processed Food, US $1,012.09 M Beverages, US $47.25 MFresh Food, US $426.75 M Marine/Aquaculture, US $627.82 M “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry“The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food IndustryTable 1.Source: DTI/BETP-Food “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food IndustryProcessed Foods:There are currently over 11, 000 processed food andbeverage companies producing a variety ofprocessed as well as innovative specialty food andbeverages- unique mixes and sauces, specialdelicacies, sumptuous desserts, and a wealth offood ingredients. These products enjoy a growingacceptance and demand worldwide.Most of the food processors are located in LuzonIsland, particularly in the National Capital Region (Metro Manila) and Southern Luzon Region ( i.e.56%). “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry The top five processed foods exports in 2010were desiccated coconuts, other milk and creamproducts in powder form, pineapplespreparation/preserved, other fruits and nuts andbanana chips. These top five products generatedsales of US $ 152.61 million, US$ 128.97million, US $126.21 million, US$46,.95 millionand US$ 40.27 million respectively. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry Table 1.Source: DTI/BETP-Food “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry In 2010, marine exports reached US $627.82 million which showed a growth of12.04 % from 2009 exports value at US $560.35 million. Of the marine products, canned tuna,fresh frozen yellow fin tuna, skippedjack/bonito, frozen shrimps/prawns andcrabs were the top five export generators. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food IndustryTable 1.Source: DTI/BETP-Food “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry INDUSTRY SNAPSHOT* BUREAU OF EXPORT TRADEPROMOTION “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • The Philippine Agro-Food Industry INDUSTRY SNAPSHOT* BUREAU OF EXPORT TRADEPROMOTION “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • PART 2The Philippines Perspectives:AEC Impact to The Food Industry
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryRegulations AEC 2015 could be expected to ease some stringent and bureaucratic regulations particularly involving the importation of resourced-based raw materials, packaging materials, machineries and equipment, technology needed to modernize the agro-food industry sector. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryRegulations Streamlining of regulations to one that involves a common and standardized tariff schedule and classification, and rules of origin could greatly contribute in the competitiveness of export food products produced by the food processing sector. Improvement of the Customs administration such as for example, towards an e-based system through the Single Window Project, the transaction costs among and between ASEAN countries would be reduced. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryRegulations Trade could be further facilitated since we could expect the institution of measures affecting the efficiency and costs associated with the movement of goods between buyers and sellers along the entire international supply chain which involve many government agencies responsible for standards, quarantine, import clearances agencies or so-called “behind-the-border” agencies. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food Industry Regulations By and large, the Philippines scorecard in complying toits AEC trade facilitation commitments is satisfactory. In a latest study, aside from One Stop Shop ExportDocumentation system, Philippines has implementedmany measures to facilitate trade. Among others reforms,the country has launched the National Electronic SingleWindow Project. This project is expected to substantiallyspeed up customs processing for importers and exportersand enhance transparency and efficiency in transactions. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryRegulations The Philippines is fully committed to AEC 2015. Tariff rates for agricultural products are higher but had been generally brought down with the Philippines having a small 0.1 average tariff. The non-tariff barriers which remain high in ASEAN will be reduced consequently in 2015. With CEPT-AFTA in full implementation and tariff barriers reduced or eliminated, the next step would be how to create an open business environment that would promote free flow of trade and accelerate transactions between and among economies.( Source: Jenny Balboa et al. Achieving AEC 2015: Challenges for the Philippines) “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food Industry Regulations A study done by Peter Petri and others, concluded that “ TheASEAN Economic Community (AEC) is the largest integration effortattempted in the developing world; if realized, it will create a singlemarket with the free movement of goods, services, foreign directinvestment and skilled labor, and freer movement of capitalencompassing nearly 600 million people. The study finds that the AEC could yield benefits similar to those ofthe European Union, amounting to 5.3% of the region’s GDP andmore than twice that if, as expected, the AEC leads to free tradeagreements with key external partners. Every ASEAN member willshare in these benefits.”(Source: Peter A. Petri, Michael G. Plummer and Fan Zhai, The Economics of the ASEAN EconomicCommunity, September 2010.) “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustrySOURCE OF RAW MATERIALS ASEAN will continue to play an increasing presence in globalsupply of agro-food products. ASEAN is as a major producerof traditional products such as vegetable oil, rice, seafood,coffee, pulses, spices, sugar, fruits ( banana, pineapple, mango)and vegetables. Most of these commodities are indigenous resourced-basedfresh produce to processed food and food ingredients. With thefull implementation of the AEC, it is expected that theconcerned ASEAN countries will benefit from economies ofscale, competitive costs of material inputs and from expandedmarket base. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustrySOURCE OF RAW MATERIALS Rice – Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia andMyanmar already supply nearly half ofglobal rice exports. This level of supply isexpected to be sustained as there remainlarge potentials for expansion in areas andfarm productivity in Cambodia, Myanmarand Laos. The Mekong River traversesCambodia and Laos while Irrawady Riverdrains into Myanmar. These river systemsmake the countries ideal producers of rice. Vegetable Oils – ASEAN dominates themarkets for coconut oil, palm oil, palmkernel oil for both food and non-food uses. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustrySOURCE OF RAW MATERIALS Sugar – Thailand remains a global keyplayer while Malaysia plays a significantrole as a processor of imported raw sugar.The Philippines already a minor exporter ispoised for expansion if and when the landreform program ends in 2013. Fruits – ASEAN is already rich sourceof a variety of tropical fruits ranging frombanana to mango to pineapple as well asexotic fruits like durian, duku, longan,mangosteen, rambutan, guava andtamarind. Dried bananas, jackfruit, papayaand pineapples are growing exports fromthe region. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustrySOURCE OF RAW MATERIALS Coffee – Indonesia and Vietnam willcontinue to play big roles in the globalrobusta market. There is room forexpansion in the highlands in thesecountries for Arabica and in thelowlands for liberica and excels. Seafoods – ASEAN is already aleading exporter of shrimps and tuna.Thailand, Indonesia and Vietnam areamong the leading world shrimpexporters. Vietnam is the leadingsupplier of catfish/pangasius. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryLABOR & TECHNOLOGY Several studies by Word Bank confirmed the fact that redeployment of resources induced by economic integration and trade liberalization is not without friction. Workers in import-competing industries may become unemployed for a period before finding jobs in expanding export industries. Output losses suffered by the economy as a result of such unemployment are the social adjustment costs of trade liberalization. However, the empirical evidence suggests that the social costs of trade liberalization tend to be small relative to its benefits. The adjustment costs will be minimized if there is strong private sector response to liberalization, particularly in newly profitable export sectors. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryLABOR & TECHNOLOGY The Philippines’ catching up with adoption of science and technology packages and products including value adding technologies in the agro-food sector. Several challenges being addressed are: 1) Because of decentralization, measures are established to strengthen the weak links between technology producers and extension workers and farmers/fisherfolks, 2) Intensify use of media and public awareness campaign of the benefits of technologies and 3) Improve access to financial/credit facilities of MSME’s and 4) Enhance capacity of intended food producers and processors “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryGOVERNMENT POLICY &PLANS The ADB survey in 2008 in general, found out that “as much as of East Asia,ASEAN economies have outward-oriented trade and investment strategies. Theirpolicies have focused on macroeconomic stability, trade liberalization,infrastructure investments in ports and roads, human capital development, andsupport for technology. A more detailed view of the trade policy environment suggests that: Protection is relatively high in agriculture and beverage products relative tomanufactures ( with exception of chemicals, transport equipment and clothing forsome countries) Protection is reasonably symmetric otherwise in any given country, tariffs aresimilar across most commodity categories. This limits distortion effects. Protection tends to fall with income. The region’s wealthiest economies-Singapore and Brunei-have essentially free-trade regimes; those with intermediateincomes- Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand-have mostly lowtariffs and its low income economies- Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam-haverelatively high tariffs. ( Myanmar is an exception with low tariffs).” “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryGOVERNMENT POLICY &PLANSIn the case of the Philippines, as noted in some studies, the major cross cuttingissues affecting the agro-food industry that have prevented it from maximizing itsgains from trade liberalization include: low investments in infrastructure, hightransaction costs, and the lack of coherent industrial policyThe Agriculture and Fishery Sector Plan is enshrined in the PhilippinesDevelopment Plan of 2011 to 2016 which envisions a “ competitive, sustainableand technology- based sector, driven by productive and progressive farmers andfisherfolks, supported by efficient value chains and well-integrated in the domesticand international markets, contributing to inclusive growth and povertyreduction.” This will be achieved through adoption of multi-pronged measures, such as: 1) topromote more value-adding into products and develop capacities of stakeholdersfor value-chain management 2) promote vertical and horizontal integration ofinput, production and marketing and strengthen the country’s agricultural exportsby focusing resources on high value crops ( fruits and vegetables, oil palm, coffee,coconut etc. and fishery products ( grouper, seabass, seaweeds etc.). “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryMARKET OPPORTUNITIES &CHALLENGES The ADB survey in 2008 in general, found out that “as much as of East Asia,ASEAN economies have outward-oriented trade and investment strategies. Theirpolicies have focused on macroeconomic stability, trade liberalization,infrastructure investments in ports and roads, human capital development, andsupport for technology. A more detailed view of the trade policy environment suggests that: Protection is relatively high in agriculture and beverage products relative tomanufactures ( with exception of chemicals, transport equipment and clothing forsome countries) Protection is reasonably symmetric otherwise in any given country, tariffs aresimilar across most commodity categories. This limits distortion effects. Protection tends to fall with income. The region’s wealthiest economies-Singaporeand Brunei-have essentially free-trade regimes; those with intermediate incomes-Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand-have mostly low tariffs and its lowincome economies- Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam-have relatively high tariffs. (Myanmar is an anomaly with low tariffs).” “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryMARKET OPPORTUNITIES &CHALLENGES The ASEAN is a fortunate region with its mix of resources, climate, people and proximity to large markets ( i. e. China, India ), all of which combine to make it a global player in food and agriculture materials. ASEAN accounts for: Half of the global rice exports Over 90% of palm oil and coconut oil exports Over three-quarters of natural rubber exports; and large volumes of fruits, principally banana and pineapples, coffee, cocoa and spices ( pepper, cinnamon, cloves, etc.0 and sea-caught and cultured foods (tuna, cuttlefish, shrimps, seaweeds and catfish). “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryMARKET OPPORTUNITIES &CHALLENGES With estimated population of over 600 million people, ASEAN is also a significant market for agribusiness products. Several market reports that the global market for additives is valued at US $ 19.60 billion. Flavors represent the largest segment with a value of US$ 6 billion, followed by hydrocolloids at US $2.82 billion, flavor enhancers US $2.5 billion, acidulants US $ 2.16 billion, sweeteners US $ 1.5 billion, gums and thickeners US $ 1.41 billion. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryMARKET OPPORTUNITIES &CHALLENGES ASEAN Inter and intra-regional trade will further grow. More affluent and health conscious consumers will demand greater quality, variety, and convenience from the food system. Rapid income growth and urbanization are having a profound impact on the food system in the developing member-economies of the region, creating opportunities to enhance farm sector profitability and encourage vibrant rural areas. Demand for packaged foods and eating out will likely increase faster. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryMARKET OPPORTUNITIES &CHALLENGES In the long run, the challenges remain to include the spectre of high food, energy and fertilizer prices as oil, natural gas and fertilizers are non-renewable resources. These problems will be exacerbated by water scarcity and climate change, While tariff barriers have come down, the export markets are getting more stringent with food safety considerations. Chemical residue limits and supply chain traceability have become more demanding and certification, more expensive. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryCONCLUDING REMARKS ASEAN has made considerable progress in economic integration,with its aim to create the AEC by 2015. The AEC would have apopulation of over 600 million, a total area of 4.5 million squarekilometers, a combined GDP of almost US $ 1,100 billion, and a totaltrade of about US $ 1,400 billion. However, after the global financial crisis that hit the world, theASEAN Economic Community (AEC) target of 2015 (free movementof goods, services, investment, skilled labor, and freer flow of capital)has delayed the much-needed progress and targets been missed orbelow expectations. The global financial crisis has called forrebalancing of priorities, policies, and measures. For one, the crisisemphasized the importance of nurturing domestic economies, andunderscored the value of adopting a more prudent stance in terms oftrade liberalization. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryCONCLUDING REMARKS For the Philippines, committing the economy to thefurther opening up of markets, at a time when domesticsectors, due to limited government support, has yet toachieve parity in terms of competitiveness with its tradepartners in key sectors, requires a careful evaluation aswell judicious balancing of the opportunities and risksassociated with these economic integration andliberalization measures. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryCONCLUDING REMARKS The Philippines Agro- Food Industry can benefit from AEC 2015 andcan be more competitive through increased investments and strongerPrivate Public Partnerships: First, the Philippine agro-food industry needs to seize fully theimmense market opportunities that AEC 2015, the FTA and other newFTAs present for both traditional and new agricultural exports. Theindustry must be made aware of these opportunities, as well as threatsfrom imports so the sector can adjust. Lower cost of farm inputs andraw materials- through improved infrastructure, lower ground and seatransport cost, less government red tape - become even more relevant.Also, R&D, agricultural education and training need ramping up. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • AEC Impact to The Food IndustryCONCLUDING REMARKS Second, agribusiness must update old models and develop new ones. By linking small crop farmers to global and domestic markets, large corporate integrators (foreign and domestic) are proving the Philippines can compete. Third, to reduce costs and increase efficiencies there must be increased integration – backwards and forwards – in priority agriculture subsectors, such as grains/feeds, livestock and poultry and fruits and vegetables. Small crop farmers should increasingly be linked in consolidated or cooperative arrangements with large companies in order for their products to be more competitive, in domestic as well as export markets. Finally, an ASEAN Supply and Value Chain collaboration among the ASEAN countries may be explored. “The Impact of AEC 2015 to the ASEAN Food Industry”
    • Industry Perspective AEC 2015 IMPACT TO THE FOOD INDUSTRY: Regulations; Source of Raw Materials; Labor and Technology; Government’s Policy and Plan; andMarket Opportunities and Challenges September 21, 2011 QNSCC, Bangkok, Thailand