© Crown CopyrightInformation used with permission and is covered by Crown Copyright
IntroductionVAT is a tax thats charged on most goods and services  that VAT-registered businesses provide in the UK. Its ...
introductionWhen a VAT-registered business buys goods or services they can generally reclaim the VAT they have paid.Ther...
What is VAT?VAT is a tax thats charged on most business transactions in the UK. Businesses add VAT to the price they char...
What is VAT?If youre a VAT-registered business, in most cases you:  Charge VAT on the goods and services you provide  R...
Who charges VAT and what VAT ischarged on?VAT-registered businesses add VAT to the sale price of most goods and services ...
What is VAT charged on?If youre VAT-registered, youll have to charge VAT on any goods and services that you provide in th...
How VAT is charged and accounted forIf youre VAT-registered, the VAT you add to the sale price of your goods or services ...
Filling in your VAT ReturnIf youre VAT-registered youll have to submit a VAT Return at regular intervals - usually quarte...
Filling in your VAT ReturnIf the input tax is more than your output tax, you claim the difference back from HMRC.There a...
Rates of VATThere are different VAT rates, depending on the goods or services that are being provided. Currently there ar...
Examples of reduced-rated itemsThese are some examples of goods and services that may be reduced-rated, depending on the ...
Items not covered by VATSome items are exempt from VAT because the law says they mustnt have any VAT charged on them. Ite...
Items not covered by VATSelling, leasing and letting of commercial land and buildings are also exempt from VAT.But you c...
Items not covered by VATThere are some things that arent in the UK VAT system at all - theyre outside the scope of VAT. T...
The difference between exemptand zero-ratedIf you sell zero-rated goods or services, they count as  taxable supplies, but...
The difference between exemptand zero-ratedGenerally, you cant register for VAT or reclaim the VAT  on your purchases if ...
VAT HelplineIf you cannot find the answer to your question on the HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) website, the easiest way is...
Business Advice Open DaysBusiness Advice Open Days are popular events designed especially for small and medium-sized busi...
Business Advice Open DaysIts an opportunity to talk to experts and get all your  questions answered in one place on the s...
VAT glossaryThese are some plain English definitions of common VAT terms that HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) uses:  Account...
VAT glossary  Despatches: goods sent to another EU country  Imports: goods brought into the EU from another   country  ...
VAT glossary  Taxable person: any business entity that buys or sells   goods or services and is required to be registered...
VAT glossary  Taxable person: any business entity that buys or sells   goods or services and is required to be registered...
FormalitiesAll the information provided is for informational purposes  only and you should seek specialist personalised a...
THE END - THANKS FOR COMINGFor more information, Twitter: @JasonCates SlideShare: slideshare.net/AdrJasonCates Visit B...
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VAT

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All information is based on the UK business system.

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  • thanks alot for ur support
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  • Any potential investors would probably want to know a bit about your expertise and what makes you qualified to run this type of business and help people with their VAT.

    You said that their is no business like yours in the area, 9 time out of 10, they will want to ask you why that is?

    Some of the other key points they may be interested in may include, but not exclusively, growth and risk.

    Every company, especially new companies, have risk associated with them. You will need to be able to identify and explain this risk with an enthesis on how you plan to mitigate this risk.

    For investor to get a return on their investment, the business will need to grow. Once you have saturated the market in terms of VAT, what next? Where areas can you business potentially expend into? For example, could you potentially help people with their income tax or corporation tax etc.

    At the end of the day, it's your business and it's up to you what you include. These are just ideas that will likely come up in the presentation or in the Q&A session at the end.

    I hope this helps.
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  • Any Update ?
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  • @AdrJasonCates Hi Jason

    thanks a lot for your fast response . I'm looking to open new VAT business in a new country , no vat company available in it , so i though u can help me with the business plan presentation .
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  • Can I kindly ask as to the context in which you are asking. This way, I can better tailor my reply. For example, my reply to a potential entrepreneur would be slightly different to that I would give a student doing a presentation for a class.

    In terms of who I target, in the context of Slideshare, I try to keep it as general as possible as to be of use to as many many people as possible with a focus on practicality and long term viability.

    Any applied information I provide will either be based on publicly available information or on a made up company as not to be a breach of confidentiality.
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VAT

  1. 1. © Crown CopyrightInformation used with permission and is covered by Crown Copyright
  2. 2. IntroductionVAT is a tax thats charged on most goods and services that VAT-registered businesses provide in the UK. Its also charged on goods and some services that are imported from countries outside the European Union (EU), and brought into the UK from other EU countries.VAT is charged when a VAT-registered business sells to either another business or to a non-business customer.When a VAT-registered business buys goods or services they can generally reclaim the VAT they have paid.
  3. 3. introductionWhen a VAT-registered business buys goods or services they can generally reclaim the VAT they have paid.There are three rates of VAT, depending on the goods or services the business provides. The rates are:  Standard - 20 per cent  Reduced - 5 per cent  Zero - 0 per centThere are also some goods and services that are:  Exempt from VAT  Outside the UK VAT system altogetherThis guide explains the basics of how VAT works. It tells you where you can find more information and advice.
  4. 4. What is VAT?VAT is a tax thats charged on most business transactions in the UK. Businesses add VAT to the price they charge when they provide goods and services to: Business customers - for example, a clothing manufacturer adds VAT to the prices they charge a clothes shop Non-business customers - members of the public or consumers - for example, a hairdressing salon includes VAT in the prices they charge members of the public
  5. 5. What is VAT?If youre a VAT-registered business, in most cases you: Charge VAT on the goods and services you provide Reclaim the VAT you pay when you buy goods and services for your businessIf you are not VAT-registered then you cannot reclaim the VAT you pay when you purchase goods and services
  6. 6. Who charges VAT and what VAT ischarged on?VAT-registered businesses add VAT to the sale price of most goods and services they provide.If youre a business and the goods or services you provide count as whats known as taxable supplies (see What is VAT charged on? below) youll have to register for VAT if either: Your turnover for the previous 12 months has gone over a specific limit - called the VAT threshold (currently £77,000) You think your turnover will soon go over this limitYou can choose to register for VAT if you want, even if you dont have to.
  7. 7. What is VAT charged on?If youre VAT-registered, youll have to charge VAT on any goods and services that you provide in the UK that are VAT taxable. You charge VAT on the full sale price, even if you accept goods in part exchange or through barter instead of money. You can find more information about goods and services on which you have to charge VAT in the guide below.
  8. 8. How VAT is charged and accounted forIf youre VAT-registered, the VAT you add to the sale price of your goods or services is called your output tax. The VAT you pay when you buy goods and services for your business is called your input tax.
  9. 9. Filling in your VAT ReturnIf youre VAT-registered youll have to submit a VAT Return at regular intervals - usually quarterly - and send it to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC). The return shows: The VAT you have charged on your sales to your customers in the period - known as output tax The VAT you have paid on your purchases - known as input taxIf the amount of output tax is more than the input tax, then you send the difference to HMRC with your return.
  10. 10. Filling in your VAT ReturnIf the input tax is more than your output tax, you claim the difference back from HMRC.There are special schemes that some businesses can use to help them work out and pay their VAT.You can read about VAT Returns, payments and repayments, VAT accounting schemes and VAT online services in our guides below.
  11. 11. Rates of VATThere are different VAT rates, depending on the goods or services that are being provided. Currently there are three rates: Standard rate - 20 per cent Reduced rate - 5 per cent Zero rate - 0 per centThe standard rate of VAT is the default rate - this is the rate thats charged on most goods and services in the UK unless theyre specifically identified as being reduced or zero-rated.
  12. 12. Examples of reduced-rated itemsThese are some examples of goods and services that may be reduced-rated, depending on the product itself and the circumstances of the sale: Domestic fuel and power Installing energy-saving materials Sanitary hygiene products Childrens car seatsThis isnt a complete list of reduced-rated items and services.
  13. 13. Items not covered by VATSome items are exempt from VAT because the law says they mustnt have any VAT charged on them. Items that are exempt include the following: Insurance Providing credit Education and training, if certain conditions are met Fundraising events by charities, if certain conditions are met Membership subscriptions, if certain conditions are met Most services provided by doctors and dentists
  14. 14. Items not covered by VATSelling, leasing and letting of commercial land and buildings are also exempt from VAT.But you can choose - or opt - to give up the right to the exemption and to charge VAT at the standard rate instead. This allows you to reclaim input tax when otherwise you wouldnt be able to.
  15. 15. Items not covered by VATThere are some things that arent in the UK VAT system at all - theyre outside the scope of VAT. They are not taxable supplies and no VAT is charged on them. Items that are outside the scope of VAT include: Non-business activities like a hobby - for example, you might sell some stamps from your collection Fees that are fixed by law - known as statutory fees - for example the congestion charge or vehicle MOT tests
  16. 16. The difference between exemptand zero-ratedIf you sell zero-rated goods or services, they count as taxable supplies, but you dont add any VAT to your selling price because the VAT rate is 0 per cent.If you sell goods or services that are exempt, you dont charge any VAT and theyre not taxable supplies. This means that you wont normally be able to reclaim any of the VAT on your expenses.
  17. 17. The difference between exemptand zero-ratedGenerally, you cant register for VAT or reclaim the VAT on your purchases if you sell only exempt goods or services. If you sell some exempt goods or services you may not be able to reclaim the VAT on all of your purchases.If you buy and sell only - or mainly - zero-rated goods or services you can apply to HM Revenue & Customs to be exempt from registering for VAT. This could make sense if you pay little or no VAT on your purchases. You can find out how to apply for exemption from registration, get details of exempt and partly exempt goods and services and check the rates of VAT and how they apply to different goods and services in our guides below.
  18. 18. VAT HelplineIf you cannot find the answer to your question on the HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) website, the easiest way is to ring the VAT Helpline where you can get most of your VAT questions answered.Before you ring, make sure you have your VAT registration number and postcode to hand. If youre not VAT- registered, youll need your postcode - its necessary so HMRC can keep a record of your call.
  19. 19. Business Advice Open DaysBusiness Advice Open Days are popular events designed especially for small and medium-sized businesses and they take place in different locations around the UK. Its not just HMRC at these events - there are other government departments as well, like the Department for Work and Pensions, the Health & Safety Executive, the Intellectual Property Office and Business Link.
  20. 20. Business Advice Open DaysIts an opportunity to talk to experts and get all your questions answered in one place on the same day. You can:  Book a one-to-one session with a VAT adviser  Attend seminars about making VAT easier  Learn how to do tax online  Get help with marketing, funding and business planning  Get tips on how to make your business grow
  21. 21. VAT glossaryThese are some plain English definitions of common VAT terms that HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) uses: Accounting period: see tax period Acquisitions: goods brought into the UK from other EU countries - (goods brought into the UK from outside of the EU are known as Imports) Corporate body: an incorporated body such as a limited company, limited liability partnership, friendly, industrial or provident society Distance sales: where a business in one EU country sells and ships goods directly to consumers in another EU country, eg internet or mail-order sales Exports: goods sent to a non-EU country
  22. 22. VAT glossary Despatches: goods sent to another EU country Imports: goods brought into the EU from another country Input tax: the VAT you pay on your purchases Output tax: the VAT you charge on your sales Place of supply: the country in which a supply of goods or services must be accounted for VAT purposes Self-billing: your customer issues your VAT invoice and sends a copy to you with their payment Supply: selling or otherwise providing goods or services, including barter and some free provision Supply of goods: when exclusive ownership of goods passes from one person to another
  23. 23. VAT glossary Taxable person: any business entity that buys or sells goods or services and is required to be registered for VAT - this includes individuals, partnerships, companies, clubs, associations and charities Taxable supplies: all goods and services sold or otherwise supplied by a taxable person which are liable to VAT at the standard, reduced or zero rate Taxable turnover: the total value - excluding VAT - of the taxable supplies you make in the UK (excludes capital items like buildings, equipment, vehicles or exempt supplies) Tax period: the period of time covered by your VAT return, usually quarterly
  24. 24. VAT glossary Taxable person: any business entity that buys or sells goods or services and is required to be registered for VAT - this includes individuals, partnerships, companies, clubs, associations and charities Taxable supplies: all goods and services sold or otherwise supplied by a taxable person which are liable to VAT at the standard, reduced or zero rate Taxable turnover: the total value - excluding VAT - of the taxable supplies you make in the UK (excludes capital items like buildings, equipment, vehicles or exempt supplies) Tax period: the period of time covered by your VAT return, usually quarterly Tax point: the date when VAT has to be accounted for
  25. 25. FormalitiesAll the information provided is for informational purposes only and you should seek specialist personalised advice as required. As such, we accept no liability for the actions taken by the readers of this slideshow.All information was provided by Business Link and is covered by Crown Copyright.All information is available as shown below:  BusinessLink (2012) Introduction to VAT. Available at: http://www.businesslink.gov.uk/bdotg/action/layer? r.i=1081174917&r.l1=1073858808&r.l2=1083126673&r.l3=1081167361&r.s=sc&r.t =RESOURCES&topicId=1081167361 [Accessed: 18th August 2012]
  26. 26. THE END - THANKS FOR COMINGFor more information, Twitter: @JasonCates SlideShare: slideshare.net/AdrJasonCates Visit BusinessLink.Gov.ukInformation from Business Link
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