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Training methods - human resource management
 

Training methods - human resource management

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    Training methods - human resource management Training methods - human resource management Document Transcript

    • FACULTY OF GEOINFORMATION AND REAL ESTATE (FGHT) UNIVERSITI TEKNOLOGI MALAYSIA SEMESTER I ACADEMIC SESSION 2012/2013 COURSE: human resource management COURSE CODE: sgt 3133 - 1 ASSIGNMENT - training methods LECTURER NAME: mrs. Ainur zaireen binti zainudin Students: Name Year/course Loggeni Annamalai 3-SGT (2012/2013) ADELINE NANI PAK 3-SGT (2012/2013) MOHD HANIF ISMAEL 3-SGT (2012/2013) MUHAMAD ASYRAQ CHE ISMAIL 3-SGT (2012/2013) SOBI MANSUR 3-SGT (2012/2013) GARY PETER GOHULU 3-SGT (2012/2013)
    • TRAINING METHODSThe general purpose of training is to improve employees’ abilities and performance on the job.There are a large number of training methods available that can be used by human resourcedepartment. Once we have decided to train employers and on what they should learn, we have todesign the training program.A. FIVE TRAINING METHODS i. On–the-Job Training On–the-Job Training (OJT) means a person learns a job by actually doing it. In many companies, OJT is the only training method. There are several types of OJT. The most common one is coaching or the understudy method. Here, an experienced worker or the supervisor trains the employee. At lower levels, trainees learn the skills by observing the supervisor. This technique is also used at top management levels. For example, a potential future CEO may spend a year as the assistant to the current CEO. Job rotation, in which an employee moves from job to job at planned intervals, is another OJT method. OJT has several advantages. It is relatively inexpensive; trainees learn while producing. There is no need for expensive off-site facilities like classrooms or programmed learning devices. The method also facilities learning, since trainees learn doing and get quick feedback on their performance. There are several points to note when using OJT that are the trainers themselves should be trained and they should be given the proper training materials. ii. Distance and Internet-Based Training There are various forms of distance learning methods. They include traditional paper- and-pencil correspondence courses, as well as teletraining, video-conferencing, and Internet-based classes.  Teletraining: In teletraining, a trainer in a central location teaches groups of employees at remote locations via television hooks-ups.
    •  Video-Conferencing: In video-conferencing, people in one location to communicate live via video equipment with people in another location, city, or country.  Internet-Based-Training: Many companies let their employees take online courses offered by online course providers. Others use their own internal intranet to facilitate computer-based training.  Learning Portals: Many employers create ‘learning portals’ to satisfy their employees’ training needs. The ‘Improving Productivity’ section explains how they do this.iii. Managerial On-The-Job Training On-The-Job Training is not just for non-managers. Managerial On-The-Job Training methods include job rotation, coaching and action learning.  Job Rotation: Job rotation means moving management trainees from department to department to broaden their understanding of all parts of the business and to test their abilities. The trainees may spend several months in each department. They may just be observes in each department, but it is more common for them to get fully involved in its operations. The trainees thus learn the department’s business by actually doing it, while discovering what jobs they prefer.  Mentoring: In the mentoring or understudy approach, the trainee works directly with a senior manager who is the trainees’ mentor. Normally, the trainee relieves that manager of certain responsibilities, thus having a chance to learn the job.  Action Learning: In action learning programs, managers are given released time to work full time on projects as a member of the project team. They analyze and solve problems in departments other than their town.
    • iv. Off-The-Job Management Training The following sections discuss some off-the-job methods used for training managers.  The Case Study Method: In a case study, trainees are given an organizational problem. They analyze the case, diagnose the problem, and discuss their solutions with other trainees.  Management Games: In management games, trainees are divided into small teams that compete with one another in a simulated market place. For example, each group must decide:-  How much to spend on advertising  How much to produce  How much inventory to maintain  How many of which product to produce Usually, the game itself compresses a two-or three-year period into days, weeks or months. As in the real world, teams do not know the decision of other teams although these decisions do affect their own performance. Management games help trainees develop their problem-solving skills, as well as focus attention on planning. The teams also usually elect their own officers and organize themselves; they can thus develop leadership skills and foster cooperation and teamwork.  Corporate University and In-House Training Center: Many large companies have their own in-house training centers. These centers need not offer a wide range of courses. They cooperate with training providers to create programs that suit their needs. Some may even work closely with a university to offer specific degree programs.
    • v. Management Development Management development is any attempt to improve managerial performance by providing knowledge, changing attitudes, or increasing skills. The aim is to improve the performance of the company. The management development process consists of the following:  Assess the company’s strategic needs ( for instance, to fill future executive openings, or to boost competitiveness).  Appraise the managers’ performance.  Develop the managers (and future managers). Some development programs are company-wide and involve all or most managers. Other development programs aim to fill specific positions, such as the CEO. This usually involves succession planning. Succession planning refers to the process through which a company plans for and fills senior positions. The typical success planning process involves these steps:  Anticipate management needs based on strategic factors like planned expansion.  Review the company’s management skills inventory (data on things like education and work experience, career preferences, and performance appraisals) to access current talent.  Create replacement charts that summarize potential candidates and each person’s development needs. As in an earlier example the development needs for a future division vice president may include job rotation, executive development programs- to provide training in strategic planning- and assignment for two weeks to the employer’s in-house management development center.
    • B. TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR G-LAMSH SDN BHD, PROPERTYDEVELOPMENT COMPANY. a. Type of the training method used - Off-The-Job Management Training (The Case Study Method) G-LAMSH Company Case Study: The company want to build the terrace housing around Skudai Town Problem statement 1. Why Skudai Town is strategic to build the housing area? 2. Is it profitable to company? b. Name of the training program Ice Breaking among Fresher’s of G-LAMSH Sdn Bhd, Property Development Company. Company Target Department: - G-LAMSH Marketing department c. Venue of the training program 1. Venue of Case Study : Around commercial developing areas in Johor Bahru town (included Skudai, Pasir Gudang, Kota Tinggi, Ulu Tiram, Masai and Gelang Patah). 2. Presentation of Case Study: Conference Hall, Level 1, Crystal Crown Hotel, Johor Bahru, Johor. d. The facilitator(s) to be involved  Six Facilitators:  Two Managers (Muhamad Asyraq Che Ismail & Gary Peter Gohulu),  Two Supervisors (Sobi Mansur & Mohd Hanif Ismael) and  Mentors (Loggeni Annamalai)  New Trainee Presenter (Adeline Nani Pak)
    • e. Duration and scheduling of the program 1. Duration and Scheduling of Case Study: One month:-  1st and 2nd week- Analyze the topic of case and diagnose the current problems that happened in the certain commercial developing areas and developers of such areas.  3rd and 4th week- Interview some people who are involved and find out the solutions for the current problems that faced by developers. 2. Duration and Scheduling of Case Presentation: Two days:-  1st day- Presentation about case and the problems that faced.  2nd day- Discuss their solutions with other trainees.f. The participants to be involved 36 trainees ( All 3SGT students) 1. ABAS AHMED ADAMI 2. AMIRAH SYAFIQAH BINTI RAMLAN 3. EE JIE QI 4. FADZLEEN NORSYAHIRA BINTI SALMAN 5. FATHIN SHAHIERA BINTI NOORADZHAR 6. GOH WEE LON 7. GOH WEI KEAT 8. IZNA BINTI MANSOR 9. KANG YI CHIEN 10. LEE LI TING 11. LEE PEI ZHEN 12. NOORHANIDA BINTI SAMAN 13. NUR MUNIRAH BINTI SULAIMAN
    • 14. NUR SALIHAA BINTI ABDUL MAJID 15. NUR ZAFIRAH BINTI ZAHARUDIN 16. NURFAHANA BINTI MALEK 17. NURUL AIN RAIHAN BINTI ISMAIL 18. NURUL ATIQAH BINTI MD AZHAR 19. NURUL NABILA BINTI MOHAMMAD FADZIL 20. NURUL WAHIDAH BINTI MOHD FAUZI 21. ONG LI ZHEN 22. SITI NADZIRAH BINTI ABD GHANI 23. SITI NURNAJMIAH BINTI ABD WAHAB 24. SITI NURSURYATI BINTI RASIDI 25. SYARIFAH NURUL HIDAYAH BINTI SYED ADNAN 26. TAN PIK WAI 27. TAN SIM JIU 28. ANISEREENA BINTI RAMLEE 29. SITI NORMALA BINTI SALLEH 30. SYARIFAH NUR BAZILAH BINTI SYED YUSOF 31. NURUL SYAFIQAH BINTI ABDUL HADI 32. NURUL AIN BINTI CHE HASHIM 33. WAN MUHAMMAD YUSUF BIN AHMAD 34. NUR HIDAYU BINTI AHMAD 35. MOHD FARID BIN ZULKIPLI 36. WAN MUHAMMAD HAZEM BIN MOHD YUSOHREFERENCE:  Gary Dessler (Florida International University) & Tan Chwee Huat (National University of Singapore), 2006, Human Resource Management An Asian Perspective.