From the classroom to the boardroom:Job search tips for the recent graduate
Adecco USA is the nation’s leading provider of recruitment and workforce solutions.Adecco provides free temporary, contrac...
About our presenterLiz Allen• Director of Training & Developmentat Adecco Group North America• 11thyear with Adecco Group•...
Now that you’ve graduated…•Post-commencement speech•College graduate survey results426%29%Wish theystarted theirjob search...
Pay close attention to your online profile.•Think like a recruiter•Clean up all social media profiles•Check your profile r...
Learn how to properly network.• Step outside the internet• Career centers, alumninetworks and associations• The elevator p...
Emphasize your potentialon your resume.• Limited job experience shouldn’t limit you• Action-oriented resumes receivemore a...
Emphasize your potentialon your resume.• Personalize your resume,not just your cover letter• Focus on key words• Know what...
Do your homeworkbeforehand.• Effort has an effect on outcome• Research the company• Meet with former andcurrent employees•...
Your interview begins longbefore you sit downwith the hiring manager.• Career fairs• Screening calls• Be aware from the mo...
Be prepared to ask questions during the interviewinstead of just answering them.• Show you’ve done your research• When to ...
Consider alternative solutions if you can’tfind your dream job right away.• Examine your skill set and strengths• Find the...
Consider the benefits of temporary employment.• Finding a lifestyle/values match• Flexible schedule• Try before you buy13
14Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/adecco
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From the classroom to the boardroom: Job search tips for the recent graduate

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  • NOTE TO DESIGN: Can we get a new cover slide if we are not partnering up with anyone?
  • NOTE TO DESIGN – Can we include a chart/infographic for this slide? Can we have the grad regrets and wishes chart perhaps? College graduate survey results – Adecco recently surveyed several young professionals who graduated between 2006 and 2010 in an effort to understand how the economic downturn has impacted graduate career paths. An astounding 71% of recent college graduates reported they would have done something differently in college to prepare for the job market. [Note to Liz – I will send the link to this study along with the drafted deck. We should discuss your intro and conclusion once you’ve reviewed the entire deck] Key points you may want to discuss -26% wished they started their job search -29% wished they spent more time networking -33% live at home with their parents College graduates of 2011 have a lot of hurdles to jump, but it seems that their success rates are already higher than 2008 graduates.
  • Pay close attention to your online profile . I ’m sure you’ve heard this at least once in your course of the job search. These days, almost everyone has a social media profile. It is a great place to express yourself and connect with friends and family. Long lost friends can find you with ease. Guess who else can find you? Recruiters or hiring managers seeking to get a glimpse of a potential employee. Think like a recruiter – You need to think like a recruiter if you are searching for a job. Odd are, they are going to check you out before calling you in for an interview or recommending you to a hiring manager. So, take the time to examine your social media presence, and put yourself in the shoes of someone who is considering hiring you for a position. It may not give you a leg up on the competition, but if you do the research, you may help prevent taking yourself out of the race before it starts. Are there any red flags? Pay attention to the pictures of you that are associated with your profile, and the tone/attitude of your posts. Clean up all social media profiles – Make sure you have a clear idea of what is visible to the general public. And make sure your privacy settings are set up in the proper way. If you don’t want others to find random pictures of you, then be sure to mark ‘for friends only’. You may want to consider taking party pictures down entirely. After college, it’s just not cool to display them on your profile. And remember that MySpace profile that you haven’t checked in ages? If you haven’t disabled the account, it’s still accessible. Lastly, always remember that everything you post on Twitter is public, and will be accessible by anyone for a long time. Think before you post. Check your profile regularly – After you’ve cleaned up your profile and properly set your privacy settings, remember to check back regularly. You never know what others have posted on your wall, or have associated with your name. We all know that person/friend who thinks they are being funny by posting a potentially embarrassing picture of you. Even though you may have set limits, things happen, and it’s up to you to make sure your online presence is consistent with and supportive of your professional image. Google yourself – and comb through the results – I’m sure you’re aware that your online presence extends way past your social media profiles. You should definitely google yourself to get an idea of what is associated with your name. You could have the same name as someone else who does embarrassing things online. How will you know until you check? After you’ve combed through the results of your search, you should set up a google alert associated with your name to catch new content that may come up. It is always good to stay informed.
  • Learn how to properly network. Networking is such an ugly word for most people. If you ’re not a natural at it, and most people aren’t, it can be a terrifying concept. But it doesn’t have to be. First, I’d like to take a second and define networking, because I’m sure some of you out there are not even sure what it is, let alone how to do it. That’s because it can mean a lot of things. Networking is all about building sincere and lasting relationships with others whom you exchange information and services. It’s about developing and managing a set of contacts that is mutually beneficial. The goal of professional networking is to cultivate a lasting connection with individuals who have similar professional interests, and to advance your personal employment opportunities. Now let’s talk about how to do that. Step outside the internet – These days you can do almost anything on the internet. We’ve already discussed many pieces of the job search that have been made easier solely by having a computer and internet access. However, we tend to forget that sometimes nothing can take the place of human interaction. You shouldn’t feel awkward about reaching out to people remotely, but in many instances meeting in person is best. Offer to take people out for coffee, or book a lunch date. Career centers, alumni networks and associations Career centers and university alumni – Go where the opportunities are. Make sure you utilize your university or college career center as much as you possibly can. Many career centers post exclusive jobs or resources that will enable you to apply to the job before it’s opened to the public. You can also learn about upcoming job fairs and get information on Alumni associations. Interacting with Alumni will afford you the opportunity to make connections based on your education which can be invaluable. You should also consider looking into joining a professional association for members of your industry. You’ll learn what others in your field are doing, and if nothing else, you can figure out where you want to be in x amount of years, or find out how people built their skills sets up and found the jobs you want to work towards. The elevator pitch – You can should have an elevator pitch ready when making new connections. This is a concise explanation of who you are professionally and what fields and titles you are interested in pursuing. It should be tailored to fit a short interaction (no longer than 45 seconds) and focus on the benefit you can bring to an organization. Think of it as a short commercial advertising yourself. People who attend career fairs, networking events, or any professional gathering generally meet more people than they can count. How will you stand out? By fitting everything you need to say into a concise elevator pitch. Distill and simplify your professional interests and goals, and it will be easier for you to make a lasting impression. Strike a balance – Once you’ve developed a good relationship with someone, be sure to strike a balance between keeping in contact with them and still respecting their time. You don’t want them to forget about you, but you also don’t want to hog their time. Be considerate when requesting time to meet with someone. If you ask to meet for coffee, set a time limit. Ask for 15 minutes of their time and don’t stay a minute longer. The little things – Sometimes people get so wrapped up in the concept of networking that they forget the little, basic things that make a big difference. First and foremost – don’t forget to smile! Others will be more likely to warm up to you if you remember to just breathe and smile. When you meet someone, say their name aloud at some point in the earlier stages of the conversation. It will help the other person feel more comfortable, and it will also help you remember their name more easily. Then there is the littlest thing of all – the business card. Have a clean and simple card handy to give out at all times.
  • Emphasize your potential on your resume. Limited job experience shouldn’t limit you – You may think that no company will hire you because you don’t have enough work experience. This isn’t necessarily true. Millions of students graduate from college every year with little to no full time work experience, and still get jobs. How? Hiring managers recognize that college graduates won’t have as much experience as someone who has 20 years in the industry under their belt. There are all sorts of positions out there, and not all of them require a ton of experience. Remember this when you embark on your job search. Action-oriented resumes receive more attention – Most resumes are jam-packed with skills and filler words. What will make you stand out from the rest? Quantify your experiences in numbers and tangible results. During your last internship, did you do something that saved the company money or made it more efficient? Did you chair an event for your sorority or fraternity that raised money for charity? Mention it on your resume. Include internships and volunteer experience – This is an easy one to remember, because at this stage in your life, you may need to list internships and volunteer experiences to round out the experience section. But don’t forget to list activities that may be relevant to the skills needed for the jobs you are seeking. Listing volunteer experiences can help set you apart from the crowd. It is important to present yourself as a well-rounded candidate, so think about all the things you’ve done off the clock when constructing a resume. Focus on relevant skills – You may have interned at a well known financial institution two summers ago when you were an Accounting major, but now you’ve decided that you want to go into marketing. You’ve switched your major and gotten the degree, but that internship is still at the top of your resume. Why? Is it because the company has a great reputation? It’s time to take it off, or at least change the positioning. When a potential employer looks at your resume, they should see the relevance immediately, or they will move on. The name of the company, or your unrelated accomplishments won’t matter at that point.
  • Emphasize your potential on your resume. Personalize your resume, not just your cover letter – This is a mistake that many people make. You spend hours scrutinizing every letter of your resume, you pick the best font and perfect format, and then you send the same resume in response to every job listing. Bad idea. The hiring manager will spend 10 seconds (if you’re lucky) scanning your resume to see why YOU are a good fit for the job. If something doesn’t click, your resume goes in the ‘no’ pile fast. Focus on key words – Perhaps you have perfected your Photoshop skills during college. Maybe you consider yourself an expert. Even if you detail your cropping and masking skills on your resume, if you don’t specifically mention the word Photoshop on your resume, you may be missing out on a clutch position. Today’s technology enables employers to search through piles of resume for specific key words in the same way that you can google a phrase on the internet. Many companies use applicant tracking software to narrow the pile of resumes received for each position. You should also make sure to use industry and position specific buzzwords on your resume. Show you speak the employer’s language, and it may help you get noticed. Before you send your resume, get a sense of the most common key words by visiting industry blogs and association sites. Another good tip is to review the job listing, and incorporate several of the same words into your resume, if they are relevant. Know what to leave out – We’ve already touched on this topic in the previous slide when we discussed focusing on relevant skills. However, it is worth specifically noting that you should read through your resume during the development process to determine what should be left out. Typically, it is a good idea to leave high school education and activities off the resume, and focus on the skills and activities that were taken to the next level. Maybe you were a member of the Fine Arts honor society in high school. Leave this off your resume, and instead mention the volunteer time you spent over several summers offering drawing classes to the community. Don’t exaggerate – This is the most obvious tip, and probably the most disregarded. Don’t exaggerate on your resume, and never lie. It will always come back to haunt you. You may get past the interview, and you may even get the job, but you can and will get fired if someone discovers that you were not truthful on your resume, even if you’ve been with the company for years. And why would you want to represent yourself falsely? You may appear qualified for a job that you won’t be happy with because from day 1, you’re in over your head. It’s not worth it. Exaggerating or lying on your resume is unforgivable, and if you get caught, you will burn bridges behind you and hamper your professional development.
  • Do your homework beforehand. Effort has an effect on outcome – This is a simple rule to keep in mind. The amount of effort your put into your networking and job hunt will often have on influence on the outcome. You need to do your homework beforehand. Always, always be prepared. Research the company – If you are not open to relocation, you should research the companies in your area to get an idea of your employment options. Before you even apply to a job, you should research the company. You will make the best impression if you show you know your stuff when it comes time for the interview. You can generally find what you need to know by doing a simple internet search. Explore the company website, and pay particular attention to the ‘About Us’ section. You should also scroll through the ‘In the Press’ or ‘News’ section to learn about new projects or campaigns. Check out their social media presence. It will give you an idea of the company culture, and you may even find unique job listings. Investigate to see if there are specific employment user groups on LinkedIn or tabs on Facebook. Participate in any social outreach you find on the internet. You can also read anonymous reviews of what it is really like to work at the company by visiting sites like glassdoor.com. Gauge how fast people get promoted by following the company on LinkedIn. Meet with former and current employees – This is a creative way to network within the company. You can find employees through connections you already have, or through social networks like LinkedIn. Be ready to ask informed questions – If you make it to the interview, make sure you have at least a few questions prepared that show you already know about the company.
  • Your interview begins long before you sit down with the hiring manager. Applicants spend time prepping themselves to look and act polished once they sit down with the hiring manager. But the truth is – your interview begins long before this point. Career fairs –You should know that when you go to a career fair, you need to be prepared to present your best professional self. Let’s say you go to an event to check out new job opportunities. You have your best suit on, and several copies of your resume in hand. You start talking with a representative who seems easygoing and laid back. He asks you questions about your social life, talks about the latest episode of your favorite television show. You find yourself treating him more like a friend than a business acquaintance, and you let your guard down. This is not a great idea. You may think that if you have a personal rapport with this individual, that they’ll be more likely to ‘help you out’ by putting in a good word for you. They may be testing you to see how professional you react. You just can’t be too sure about these things. Conduct yourself in the same way that you would in the interview. You don’t have to be stiff – let your personality shine through, and develop the connection. Just remember that you are still trying to land a job and it is important to project a professional image. Pay attention to your body language, show you’ve done your research about the company, and consider sending a thank you note to the recruiter after you’ve met. This is a positive way of standing out. Screening calls – There is a very similar lesson to be learned here. If you are in the job market, remember that every time you answer a phone call from an unknown origin, it could be from a prospective employer. Make sure there is no music blaring in the background, and be prepared to have a discussion about your professional abilities when you pick up the phone. Also, your voicemail greeting should be brief and professional sounding. The ringback tone that you think is great (the latest pop or hip-hop song perhaps) should be taken off your phone for the entire time you are searching for a job. Consider all the little things that may make a negative impression. Be aware from the moment you walk in the door – Have yourself together before you walk into the building. You may think you’ll be able to change shoes and put on makeup in the bathroom before walking into the office, but you don’t know who will notice you in the lobby or elevator. Be courteous to everyone you come into contact with. This is the stuff that movies are made of. You cut off someone at the door because you don’t want to be late, and it turns out it was the person who will be interviewing you. Not a good way to start off. Be kind to the receptionist – I say this specifically not just to reinforce the overall lesson here. The person who greets you when you walk in the door could have more influence than you think. Often the hiring manager will circle back with the receptionist to see if she noticed any red flags. Were you talking on your phone or texting non-stop the entire time you waited, or did you wait patiently with only your resume in hand and a calm smile on your face? First impressions make a big difference, and more people will form an opinion of you before, during and after your interview than you think.
  • Be prepared to ask questions during the interview instead of just answering them. Show you’ve done your research – We’ve already discussed this at length, but it’s worth saying twice. Make sure to show you’ve done your research when you are being interviewed. You should know about the company, and you should also know why you want to work there. Be prepared to discuss how your professional goals fit with the position and the company. When to ask – Generally, the interviewer will leave time for you to ask questions towards the end of the interview. You should follow their lead and reserve your questions until this time, unless a natural pause occurs when you can ask about something that is directly related to the conversation. If they do not offer a time, ask if you can ask a few questions. This will show initiative on your part, and a strong interest in the position. Know which questions to ask – Having questions prepared shows that you have taken an active interest in the position. Your interviewer will judge you based on the questions you ask. Prepare 3-5 questions that are thoughtful, articulate and concise beforehand. You may have more in mind, but you’ll need to prioritize your questions based on the information discussed during the interview and the time you have allotted. If you are meeting with multiple individuals for a lengthy interview session, pay attention to the job title of the person interviewing you, and ask questions that are relevant to their company role. Open-ended questions are best, because they can start a conversation and won’t result in a yes or no answer. You should also know which questions NOT to ask. Never ask about salary or benefits in the initial interview. You may come off as being more interested in the perks of the job than the actual job itself. Also, pay attention to make sure that your questions have not been answered already during the course of the interview. Sample questions - Obviously every interview will be different, and as we’ve already mentioned, your questions should be tailored to the job title and company. But if you need a few to get you started thinking in the right direction, here are a few sample questions: What do you enjoy most about working for this company/department? Can you describe the management style of the heads of your department? What type of employee behavior is successful in this environment? What will a typical day look like for someone working in the position we’re discussing? What is this organization’s greatest strength and weakness? Can you describe a typical employee performance review? How often do they occur in this department, and is there a specific criteria for evaluation?
  • Consider alternative solutions if you can ’t find your dream job right away. You may have a clear idea of the exact position you ’ re seeking, and there are open positions in your area that match your skills and qualifications. But what happens if you ’ re unsure which path to take? Or if you don ’ t get hired for the jobs you desire? You can ’ t just give up. You need to consider what to do if you don ’ t find your dream job right out of college. Examine your skill set and strengths – It is not very common that graduates find the perfect job right out of college. I’m not saying it doesn’t happen, but it’s rare. The job of your dreams most often requires a higher level of skill and experience than a college graduate has. This is not a bad thing, you just need to develop your skill level and receive a chance to prove yourself. You need to be honest with yourself about your skill level and strengths. Ask yourself what you need to develop to get to the next level and look for a position that will help you grow. You’ll get to where you want to be if you work hard and keep an open mind. Find the connection – Consider jobs that are not a perfect fit at first glance. If you are not successful in your first run at the job search, consider casting a wider net. You may be able to develop skills in a position outside your desired field that will complement the skills you need for a position in your field. Think outside the box and find the connection to your professional development. Internships and part-time jobs - You also may want to consider applying for internships and part-time jobs if you can’t find the full-time position you are seeking. If you have already completed an internship, you may think it’s unnecessary to seek another one. Why? Now that you’ve completed your degree, you should have a better idea of the type of job you are seeking. Use the internship and the part-time job as a way of getting your foot in the door of a company that does not have any open permanent positions. When one opens up, you could be the first person they see – both literally and figuratively. Volunteer – Volunteering is a great way to spend your free time for so many reasons. You’ll open yourself up to new working experiences, and may discover interests you didn’t know you had. You can contribute your valuable time to a cause you care about. You can meet people in your industry and try out some of the networking tips we’ve discussed. And you can fill in gaps in your resume by doing something positive. It’s a win-win situation.
  • Temporary employment – Many students are turning to temporary employment after graduating in this economy. According to a recent survey of college graduates between the ages of 22 and 26: Nearly a fifth (19%) of all undergraduates turned to temporary jobs within six months of graduation. A quarter (25%) of 2008 grads worked at a temporary job within 6 months of graduation, compared to 9% of 2007 grads. And temping doesn’t have to be something you settle for in lieu of a permanent position. Temporary appointments offer many advantages and can really help you get your foot in the door at some really great companies. Finding a lifestyle/values match – It is really important to find a job that complements your lifestyle and matches your values. But it can be hard to glean this valuable information after 1 or 2 interviews. What is important to you in a company? Define this beforehand if possible, and then try taking a temporary job with a company you’d like to work for permanently to see if it’s a good match. Flexible schedule – Temporary assignments can be on an as-needed, day-to-day or long-term basis. You’ll be able to earn a paycheck on a flexible schedule. You’ll also be able to continue your job search while still earning money. Try before you buy – This is a phrase that gets bounced around here at Adecco often. It is mutually beneficial for both you and the company to try each other on before committing to a permanent position. You’ll get an insider’s view of what it’s really like to work somewhere, and your employer will see you demonstrate your skills. This is another win-win situation.
  • From the classroom to the boardroom: Job search tips for the recent graduate

    1. 1. From the classroom to the boardroom:Job search tips for the recent graduate
    2. 2. Adecco USA is the nation’s leading provider of recruitment and workforce solutions.Adecco provides free temporary, contract and direct-hire staffing services to job seekers.To help you realize your goals, we offer career counseling, resume enhancement, interviewpreparation, skills training and advice about local job markets and workplace trends, as wellas one of the most comprehensive benefits programs in the industry.Please visit us at adeccousa.com to learn more.About us2
    3. 3. About our presenterLiz Allen• Director of Training & Developmentat Adecco Group North America• 11thyear with Adecco Group• Trains Adecco recruiters how to findthe best and brightest talent in themarket!3
    4. 4. Now that you’ve graduated…•Post-commencement speech•College graduate survey results426%29%Wish theystarted theirjob searchearlierWish theynetworkedmore
    5. 5. Pay close attention to your online profile.•Think like a recruiter•Clean up all social media profiles•Check your profile regularly•Google yourself – and comb through the results5
    6. 6. Learn how to properly network.• Step outside the internet• Career centers, alumninetworks and associations• The elevator pitch• Strike a balance• The little things6
    7. 7. Emphasize your potentialon your resume.• Limited job experience shouldn’t limit you• Action-oriented resumes receivemore attention• Include internships andvolunteer experience• Focus on relevant skills7
    8. 8. Emphasize your potentialon your resume.• Personalize your resume,not just your cover letter• Focus on key words• Know what to leave out• Don’t exaggerate8
    9. 9. Do your homeworkbeforehand.• Effort has an effect on outcome• Research the company• Meet with former andcurrent employees• Be ready to askinformed questions9
    10. 10. Your interview begins longbefore you sit downwith the hiring manager.• Career fairs• Screening calls• Be aware from the momentyou walk in the door• Be kind to the receptionist10
    11. 11. Be prepared to ask questions during the interviewinstead of just answering them.• Show you’ve done your research• When to ask• Know which questions to ask• Sample questions11
    12. 12. Consider alternative solutions if you can’tfind your dream job right away.• Examine your skill set and strengths• Find the connection• Internships and part-time jobs• Volunteer12
    13. 13. Consider the benefits of temporary employment.• Finding a lifestyle/values match• Flexible schedule• Try before you buy13
    14. 14. 14Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/adecco

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