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AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF
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AddamsMoring 2007 CC Licenses In Scholarly and Scientific Publishing in PDF

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Why we should use Creative Commons by-nc-nd and by-nc-sa licenses in scientific-scholarly publishing - PDF format

Why we should use Creative Commons by-nc-nd and by-nc-sa licenses in scientific-scholarly publishing - PDF format

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  • 1. Creative Commons licenses in scholarly and scientific publishing – an idea whose time has come Ronja Addams-Moring ISCRAM2007 conference Round Table presentation
  • 2. Disclaimer • The views, interpretations and opinions expressed in this presentation are mine • There certainly are similarities with some other persons' views but that is not their responsibility • Feel free to copy, distribute, criticize, ignore or form derivative opinions as you see fit  14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 2
  • 3. Presentation outline • Task analysis: What we researchers do • Requirements: What we need • Historical overview • Current practices • Choosing our approach • Which CC license(s) fit? 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 3
  • 4. Task analysis • A simplified ”circle of life” of scientific- scholarly knowledge 1) Researcher A publishes a new result 2) Based on A’s result, other researchers create more new knowledge 3) Researcher A uses other researchers’ results as input for more research 4) The process repeats: Body of Knowledge grows larger and better with each ”round” 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 4
  • 5. Requirements • The essential necessities – Access to previous publications – Visibility of own work – Plus a multitude of things not addressed here • Coffee! • Equipment! • Finding the relevant previous publications! • Funding • Colleagues, students and staff • etc 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 5
  • 6. Historical overview 1(3) • Before 1886 only national laws – Problem: legal to print and sell e.g. a Belgian book in France without author’s permission – Solution: international copyright conventions – New problem: public domain only alternative • Copyright protects the form (wording, lay-out, typography, pictures, etc) for ca. 100 years • Copyright does not protect ideas or solution principles (that’s what patents are for) 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 6
  • 7. Historical overview 2(3) • 1980ies: Richard M. Stallman: Emacs, GNU – Problem: RMS shared source code with a friend who developed it, sold it and the buyer forbade RMS to use any of the friend’s code – Solution: GNU GPL, first copyleft license • The copyleft innovation: share-alike – The license sticks to the work and its derivatives forever (”strong copyleft”) • Limitation of strong copyleft’s social acceptability: absolute, all-in-one, no degrees, no exceptions 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 7
  • 8. Historical overview 3(3) • Many other approaches; attempts to remedy strong copyleft’s shortcomings • 2001 Creative Commons – authors choose which rights they license • Meanwhile, the cost for university libraries of offering journals has skyrocketed – 1986-2005: +302% serial expenditures (ARL) • Economic possibilities of offering monographs are growing ever slimmer? 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 8
  • 9. Current practices • Scholarly and scientific publishers – Many require that author gives away copyright – Each has own principles and practices – Each has own vocabulary (“dialect of legalese”)  Author must learn all or check every time what (s)he may do with own work • Creative Commons (CC) offers – Author keeps copyright, licenses work to users – Standardized vocabulary & ready-made legal jargon – Well-known ”brand” – Easy enough user interface for author and user 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 9
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  • 13. Example 1(4) • Springer, Natural Hazards (1st issue March 1988) • “An author – may self-archive an author-created version of his/her article on his/her own website and his/her institution's repository, including his/her final version; – …may not use the publisher's PDF version which is posted on www.springerlink.com. Furthermore, the author may only post his/her version – provided acknowledgement is given to the original source of publication and a link is inserted to the published article on Springer's website. The link must be accompanied by the following text: quot;The original publication is available at www.springerlink.comquot;.” 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 13
  • 14. Example 2(4) • Blackwell Publishing, Disasters (1st issue March 1997) • “you may use the accepted version of the Article … updated … after peer review… – you may share print or electronic copies of the Article with colleagues; – you may use all or part of the Article and abstract, without revision or modification, in personal compilations or other publications of your own work; – you may use the Article within your employer’s institution or company for educational or research purposes, including use in course packs; – 24 months after publication you may post an electronic version of the Article on your own personal website, on your employer’s website/repository and on free public servers in your subject area.” 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 14
  • 15. Example 3(4) • Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (1st issue May 2003); semi-open • “The following uses are always permitted to the author(s) ... provided … does not alter the articles …: – Storage and back-up of the article … provided that the article … is not readily accessible by persons other than the author(s); – Posting of the article on the author(s) personal website, provided that the website is non-commercial; – Posting of the article on the internet as part of a non- commercial open access institutional repository or other non-commercial open access publication site affiliated with the author(s)'s place of employment …; – Posting of the article on a non-commercial course website for a course being taught by the author at the university or college employing the author.” 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 15
  • 16. Example 4(4) • Open Medicine (1st issue 18th April 2007) • “Open Medicine applies the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike License … • because … there should be no financial barriers to access to information that can benefit medical practice. … authors should retain copyright to the article they have worked so hard to produce.” 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 16
  • 17. What makes a great idea? • It is right, because • In case any of e.g. these apply – Research is done with public funds – The results influences public spending – Research addresses the well-being of the general public (medicine, social psychology, political science, ISCRAM…) • Then that research should be fully public – Available to be freely utilized – Open to critical comments from all 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 17
  • 18. What makes a great idea? • It is (often) profitable, because • Open access to electronic versions boosts sales of printed versions (National Academic Press, since 1994) • Open access -> higher impact (JHSEM) • Problem: funding of some academic societies • One solution: HTML is free, small(ish) sum for ”neater” PDF (Amer. Scientist) 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 18
  • 19. What makes a great idea? • It is fun! because 1. It really annoys an established industry who is making a lot of money 2. It’s legal 3. It gets you excited to get out of bed every morning • John Buckman (2007) How to piss off the Music Industry for Fun and Profit. PDF via: http://blogs.magnatune.com/buckman/2007/05/how_t 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 19
  • 20. Choosing our approach • Why should we authorize anyone to ”hide” our work? (Blackwell, Elsevier & Co.) • Why would we agree to keep track of N different copyright systems? • Why would we pay or work extra to make our work fully public? (Kluver, ACM & Co.) • Why do we require reader identification? (ISCRAM, JHSEM & Co.) • What else needs to be considered? 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 20
  • 21. Which CC license(s) fit? a) The individual researcher b) A professional community as publisher c) The scientific-scholarly community • Attribution (by) – always included • NonCommercial (nc) – smart, realistic • ShareAlike (sa) or NoDerivatives (nd) – that is the question 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 21
  • 22. My answer • I want my work to be used & I like to get paid • Therefore, this work is licensed under the Creative Commons license Attribution Non- Commercial ShareAlike 3.0 Unported – Attribution form: Ronja Addams-Moring (2007) ”Creative Commons licenses in scholarly and scientific publishing – an idea whose time has come”. Round Table presentation 14th May at the ISCRAM2007 conference, Delft, NL, EU. – The license terms are available via: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/deed.en 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 22
  • 23. What say you? • Each of us should make her or his own copyright/left decisions (with co-authors, preferably before starting) • Our decisions should be documented in such a manner that others can easily understand them: therefore CC?  ISCRAM conferences may need two CC licenses in the future: by+nc for all, plus a choise: sa or nd • Thank you for your time! Let’s talk more during these conference days. • http://www.iki.fi/~ronja/ • http://no-fate-but-what-we-make.blogspot.com/ • ronja [at] iki [dot] fi ; skype: ronja-am 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 23
  • 24. See for yourself, starters • http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/me • Hal Abelson on MIT Open Courseware: http://www.hicss.hawaii.edu/hicss_40/Abelson • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyleft • Ethical background: Steven Levy (1984) Hackers. Dell Publishing, New York, NY, USA. ISBN: 0-440-13405-6. 14th May 2007 Ronja Addams-Moring 24

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