From the Outside-In
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From the Outside-In

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For The Pivot 2010 Conference....

For The Pivot 2010 Conference.
The importance of taking an outside-in perspective in designing for new experiences.

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  • <br />
  • Many households have medicine cabinets filled with pill bottles. The pill bottles all look roughly the same, and are hard to read, which leads to the startling statistic that 60% of people taking medication have taken it incorrectly at some point. <br /> For designer Deborah Adler (click), she had a personal take on this. (click to start audio) <br />
  • Many households have medicine cabinets filled with pill bottles. The pill bottles all look roughly the same, and are hard to read, which leads to the startling statistic that 60% of people taking medication have taken it incorrectly at some point. <br /> For designer Deborah Adler (click), she had a personal take on this. (click to start audio) <br />
  • Many households have medicine cabinets filled with pill bottles. The pill bottles all look roughly the same, and are hard to read, which leads to the startling statistic that 60% of people taking medication have taken it incorrectly at some point. <br /> For designer Deborah Adler (click), she had a personal take on this. (click to start audio) <br />
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  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
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  • By the fact that you are here at this workshop, I&#x2019;m pretty sure that your organization doesn&#x2019;t use this model but I&#x2019;m sure you know organizations that do. <br />
  • By the fact that you are here at this workshop, I&#x2019;m pretty sure that your organization doesn&#x2019;t use this model but I&#x2019;m sure you know organizations that do. <br />
  • A focus on preferences, positioning, and stories. This view of people has spawned millions of focus groups and market surveys. It also tends to focus teams on tracking or trying to influence preference through positioning, packaging, and marketing instead of creating useful, engaging, and delightful designs. <br /> <br /> This view can also encourage organizations to throw more money and effort toward marketing than design. It also tends to encourage a disconnect between marketing and design within companies such that craft the story of a product after or in isolation from the creation of that product. <br /> <br /> Of the three models, this is the most disrespectful of the people we are ostensibly trying to serve. <br />
  • A focus on preferences, positioning, and stories. This view of people has spawned millions of focus groups and market surveys. It also tends to focus teams on tracking or trying to influence preference through positioning, packaging, and marketing instead of creating useful, engaging, and delightful designs. <br /> <br /> This view can also encourage organizations to throw more money and effort toward marketing than design. It also tends to encourage a disconnect between marketing and design within companies such that craft the story of a product after or in isolation from the creation of that product. <br /> <br /> Of the three models, this is the most disrespectful of the people we are ostensibly trying to serve. <br />
  • Homo Economicus: The classic model of people used by companies for quite some time. This model tends to make companies focus on quantity. More features, for less. <br /> <br /> Taking this view makes the world of users and consumers looking a lot like the planet Vulcan. <br />
  • Homo Economicus: The classic model of people used by companies for quite some time. This model tends to make companies focus on quantity. More features, for less. <br /> <br /> Taking this view makes the world of users and consumers looking a lot like the planet Vulcan. <br />
  • Usability and traditional HCI helped to bring about a revolution in the way we think about people. Rather than quantity, it focused us on process: tasks and goals. But the picture this paints of humanity is a world of Type A personalities obsessively focused on predefined goals and the steps that lead to those goals. Our customers are like robots executing their programs. In this view, time on task and number of steps become the ultimate measuring sticks. <br />
  • Usability and traditional HCI helped to bring about a revolution in the way we think about people. Rather than quantity, it focused us on process: tasks and goals. But the picture this paints of humanity is a world of Type A personalities obsessively focused on predefined goals and the steps that lead to those goals. Our customers are like robots executing their programs. In this view, time on task and number of steps become the ultimate measuring sticks. <br />
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Transcript

  • 1. From
the
Outside‐In Embedding
an
Experience
Mindset Peter
Merholz Adap/ve
Path t:
@peterme e:
peterme@adap/vepath.com
  • 2. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 2
  • 3. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 2
  • 4. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 2
  • 5. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 3
  • 6. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 3
  • 7. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 4
  • 8. experiences interac/ons touchpoints procedures systems 
©
2010
adaptive
path 5
  • 9. experiences interac/ons touchpoints procedures systems 
©
2010
adaptive
path 5
  • 10. experiences interac/ons touchpoints procedures systems 
©
2010
adaptive
path 6
  • 11. experiences interac/ons touchpoints procedures systems 
©
2010
adaptive
path 6
  • 12. experiences interac/ons touchpoints procedures systems 
©
2010
adaptive
path 6
  • 13. experiences interac/ons touchpoints procedures systems 
©
2010
adaptive
path 6
  • 14. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 7
  • 15. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 7
  • 16. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 7
  • 17. IT
systems POS
system CRM supply
chain 
©
2010
adaptive
path 7
  • 18. ClearRX
marke/ng IT
systems POS
system CRM supply
chain 
©
2010
adaptive
path 7
  • 19. ClearRX
marke/ng IT
systems POS
system training CRM supply
chain 
©
2010
adaptive
path 7
  • 20. pharmacists ClearRX
marke/ng IT
systems POS
system training CRM supply
chain 
©
2010
adaptive
path 7
  • 21. customer
facing pill
boIle pharmacists ClearRX
marke/ng IT
systems POS
system training CRM supply
chain 
©
2010
adaptive
path 7
  • 22. customer
facing pill
boIle pharmacists ClearRX
marke/ng IT
systems POS
system training CRM supply
chain 
©
2010
adaptive
path 7
  • 23. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 8
  • 24. In
order
to
address
the
complexity
of
our
challenges,
we
must
widely
 draw
from
cross‐func;onal
teams.

 
©
2010
adaptive
path 8
  • 25. soK war e
en gine e
 er dwar har eer egist engi n des ign
strat naming
 consultant industrial
 designer In
order
to
address
the
complexity
of
our
challenges,
we
must
widely
 draw
from
cross‐func;onal
teams.

 
©
2010
adaptive
path 8
  • 26. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 9
  • 27. Design
can
be
an
 ac;vity
that
an
 organiza;on
embraces,
 that
everyone
can
be
 involved
in. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 9
  • 28. An
experience
mindset
requires
honest
empathy 
©
2010
adaptive
path 10
  • 29. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 11
  • 30. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 11
  • 31. 4 old ways of thinking 
©
2010
adaptive
path
  • 32. #1 $ At worst: Ruthlessly stolen from The Cluetrain Manifesto 
©
2010
adaptive
path
  • 33. #1 $ At worst: “a gullet whose only purpose in life is to gulp products and crap cash.” Ruthlessly stolen from The Cluetrain Manifesto 
©
2010
adaptive
path
  • 34. #2 Docile and gullible Stories and messaging Preferences! 
©
2010
adaptive
path 14
  • 35. #2 Sheep Docile and gullible Stories and messaging Preferences! 
©
2010
adaptive
path 14
  • 36. #3 Homo Economicus Highly rational Maximizes utility Quantity! 
©
2010
adaptive
path 15
  • 37. #3 Homo Economicus Highly rational Maximizes utility Quantity! 
©
2010
adaptive
path 15
  • 38. #4 Task oriented Goal driven Efficiency! 
©
2010
adaptive
path 16
  • 39. #4 Robot Task oriented Goal driven Efficiency! 
©
2010
adaptive
path 16
  • 40. Emo;onal + Intellectual + Func;onal 
©
2010
adaptive
path 17
  • 41. Emo;onal + Intellectual + Func;onal Empathy 
©
2010
adaptive
path 17
  • 42. An
experience
mindset
means
nothing
stands
alone 
©
2010
adaptive
path 18
  • 43. The
Long
Wow Plan
and
stage
the
wow
 experience wow Manage
your
plaMorm
 Evolve
your
repeatable
 for
delivery process Draw
from
a
wide
 area
of
unmet
needs 
©
2010
adaptive
path 19
  • 44. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 20
  • 45. pack
in
features
up
 front 
©
2010
adaptive
path 20
  • 46. pack
in
features
up
 unfold
new
 front experiences
over
 /me 
©
2010
adaptive
path 20
  • 47. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 21
  • 48. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 21
  • 49. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 21
  • 50. wow Synched
tracking 
©
2010
adaptive
path 21
  • 51. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 21
  • 52. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 22
  • 53. { } 
©
2010
adaptive
path 22
  • 54. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 22
  • 55. wow Powersong! 
©
2010
adaptive
path 23
  • 56. { …it’s
the
eye
of
the
5ger
it
the
thrill
of
the
fight…
 } wow Powersong! 
©
2010
adaptive
path 23
  • 57. wow Collabora/ve running 
©
2010
adaptive
path 24
  • 58. wow Collabora/ve running 
©
2010
adaptive
path 24
  • 59. wow Collabora/ve running 
©
2010
adaptive
path 24
  • 60. wow Networked running
events 
©
2010
adaptive
path 25
  • 61. wow Networked running
events 
©
2010
adaptive
path 25
  • 62. 
©
2010
adaptive
path 26
  • 63. Running
 shoes iPod
nano Tracking
 tools Pedometer Nike+
 website Music 
©
2010
adaptive
path 26
  • 64. Running
 shoes iPod
nano Tracking
 tools Pedometer Voiceover
feedback Nike+
 website Music 
©
2010
adaptive
path 26
  • 65. Running
 shoes Synched
tracking iPod
nano Tracking
 tools Pedometer Voiceover
feedback Nike+
 website Music 
©
2010
adaptive
path 26
  • 66. Running
 shoes Synched
tracking iPod
nano Tracking
 tools Pedometer Voiceover
feedback Nike+
 website Music Powersongs 
©
2010
adaptive
path 26
  • 67. Running
 shoes Synched
tracking iPod
nano Tracking
 tools Pedometer Voiceover
feedback Nike+
 website Music Collabora/ve
running Powersongs 
©
2010
adaptive
path 26
  • 68. Running
 shoes Synched
tracking iPod
nano Networked
running
events Tracking
 tools Pedometer Voiceover
feedback Nike+
 website Music Collabora/ve
running Powersongs 
©
2010
adaptive
path 26
  • 69. Running
 shoes Synched
tracking iPod
nano Networked
running
events Tracking
 tools Pedometer Voiceover
feedback Nike+
 website Music Sport
iMixes Collabora/ve
running Powersongs 
©
2010
adaptive
path 26
  • 70. Running
 shoes Synched
tracking iPod
nano Networked
running
events Tracking
 tools Pedometer Voiceover
feedback Nike+
 website Music Sport
iMixes Desktop
 Collabora/ve
running widgets Powersongs 
©
2010
adaptive
path 26
  • 71. Nike+
 Running
 sportsband shoes Synched
tracking iPod
nano Networked
running
events Tracking
 tools Pedometer Voiceover
feedback Nike+
 website Music Sport
iMixes Desktop
 Collabora/ve
running widgets Powersongs 
©
2010
adaptive
path 26
  • 72. The
Long
Wow Plan
and
stage
the
wow
 experience wow Manage
your
plaMorm
 Evolve
your
repeatable
 for
delivery process Draw
from
a
wide
 area
of
unmet
needs 
©
2010
adaptive
path 27
  • 73. The
Long
Wow Plan
and
stage
the
wow
 experience wow wow wow wow wow wow wow wow Manage
your
plaMorm
 Evolve
your
repeatable
 for
delivery process Draw
from
a
wide
 area
of
unmet
needs 
©
2010
adaptive
path 27
  • 74. ©
2010
adaptive
path 28
  • 75. ©
2010
adaptive
path 29
  • 76. ©
2010
adaptive
path 29
  • 77. 79.
Delta 85.
United 27.
Southwest 35.
JetBlue Image Frame 113.
Northwest 55.
Con;nental 121.
US
Airways Forrester’s
2010
Customer
Experience
Index ©
2010
adaptive
path
  • 78. “Colleen
[BarreI]
is
primarily
responsible
for
the
humanis;c
culture
 that
we
have
at
Southwest
today...One
of
the
really
significant
things
 she
did
was
give
our
people
on
the
front
line
a
lot
of
flexibility.
 Basically,
she
ascertained
that
we
could
not
an;cipate
every
 situa;on
that
would
evolve
in
a
given
sta/on
at
a
passenger
 terminal.
Therefore,
she
told
our
employees‐‐and
meant
it‐‐that
 as
long
as
you
are
leaning
toward
the
customer,
you
are
OK...
They
 did
not
need
to
ask
permission
from
anybody
to
do
so.” Herb
Kelleher,
founder
of
Southwest
Airlines ©
2010
adaptive
path
  • 79. Customer
experience
is
not
something
an
organiza/on
buys,
 it’s
a
mindset
it
adopts.
  • 80. Peter
Merholz Adap/ve
Path t:
@peterme e:
peterme@adap/vepath.com 
©
2010
adaptive
path 33
  • 81. Thank
You Peter
Merholz Adap/ve
Path t:
@peterme e:
peterme@adap/vepath.com 
©
2010
adaptive
path 33