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From the Outside-In
 

From the Outside-In

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For The Pivot 2010 Conference.

For The Pivot 2010 Conference.
The importance of taking an outside-in perspective in designing for new experiences.

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  • Many households have medicine cabinets filled with pill bottles. The pill bottles all look roughly the same, and are hard to read, which leads to the startling statistic that 60% of people taking medication have taken it incorrectly at some point. <br /> For designer Deborah Adler (click), she had a personal take on this. (click to start audio) <br />
  • Many households have medicine cabinets filled with pill bottles. The pill bottles all look roughly the same, and are hard to read, which leads to the startling statistic that 60% of people taking medication have taken it incorrectly at some point. <br /> For designer Deborah Adler (click), she had a personal take on this. (click to start audio) <br />
  • Many households have medicine cabinets filled with pill bottles. The pill bottles all look roughly the same, and are hard to read, which leads to the startling statistic that 60% of people taking medication have taken it incorrectly at some point. <br /> For designer Deborah Adler (click), she had a personal take on this. (click to start audio) <br />
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  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
  • [After Deborah speaks] <br /> Look at all the potential points of failure or stoppage. This project could have easily been killed numerous times. Why did it survive? <br />
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  • By the fact that you are here at this workshop, I&#x2019;m pretty sure that your organization doesn&#x2019;t use this model but I&#x2019;m sure you know organizations that do. <br />
  • By the fact that you are here at this workshop, I&#x2019;m pretty sure that your organization doesn&#x2019;t use this model but I&#x2019;m sure you know organizations that do. <br />
  • A focus on preferences, positioning, and stories. This view of people has spawned millions of focus groups and market surveys. It also tends to focus teams on tracking or trying to influence preference through positioning, packaging, and marketing instead of creating useful, engaging, and delightful designs. <br /> <br /> This view can also encourage organizations to throw more money and effort toward marketing than design. It also tends to encourage a disconnect between marketing and design within companies such that craft the story of a product after or in isolation from the creation of that product. <br /> <br /> Of the three models, this is the most disrespectful of the people we are ostensibly trying to serve. <br />
  • A focus on preferences, positioning, and stories. This view of people has spawned millions of focus groups and market surveys. It also tends to focus teams on tracking or trying to influence preference through positioning, packaging, and marketing instead of creating useful, engaging, and delightful designs. <br /> <br /> This view can also encourage organizations to throw more money and effort toward marketing than design. It also tends to encourage a disconnect between marketing and design within companies such that craft the story of a product after or in isolation from the creation of that product. <br /> <br /> Of the three models, this is the most disrespectful of the people we are ostensibly trying to serve. <br />
  • Homo Economicus: The classic model of people used by companies for quite some time. This model tends to make companies focus on quantity. More features, for less. <br /> <br /> Taking this view makes the world of users and consumers looking a lot like the planet Vulcan. <br />
  • Homo Economicus: The classic model of people used by companies for quite some time. This model tends to make companies focus on quantity. More features, for less. <br /> <br /> Taking this view makes the world of users and consumers looking a lot like the planet Vulcan. <br />
  • Usability and traditional HCI helped to bring about a revolution in the way we think about people. Rather than quantity, it focused us on process: tasks and goals. But the picture this paints of humanity is a world of Type A personalities obsessively focused on predefined goals and the steps that lead to those goals. Our customers are like robots executing their programs. In this view, time on task and number of steps become the ultimate measuring sticks. <br />
  • Usability and traditional HCI helped to bring about a revolution in the way we think about people. Rather than quantity, it focused us on process: tasks and goals. But the picture this paints of humanity is a world of Type A personalities obsessively focused on predefined goals and the steps that lead to those goals. Our customers are like robots executing their programs. In this view, time on task and number of steps become the ultimate measuring sticks. <br />
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