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Online Training Resource for Climate Adaptation:  Analysing Climate Vulnerability - Socio-economic vulnerability
 

Online Training Resource for Climate Adaptation: Analysing Climate Vulnerability - Socio-economic vulnerability

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Socio-Economic Climate Vulnerability ...

Socio-Economic Climate Vulnerability

This module provides a breakdown of socio-economic vulnerabilities and the methods for analysing them and will cover the following:
Utilising existing methodologies
Generating socio-economic data

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Online Training Resource for Climate Adaptation:  Analysing Climate Vulnerability - Socio-economic vulnerability Online Training Resource for Climate Adaptation: Analysing Climate Vulnerability - Socio-economic vulnerability Presentation Transcript

  • Online Training Resource: Climate AdaptationAnalysing Climate Vulnerability
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicSocio-Economic Climate VulnerabilityThis module provides a breakdown of socio-economic vulnerabilities and the methods for analysing themand will cover the following:• Utilising existing methodologies• Generating socio-economic data Climate AdaptationOnline Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicSocio-economic climate vulnerability Decreasing the vulnerability of socio-economic sectors and ecological systems to natural climate variability through a more informed choice of policies, practices and technologies will, in many cases, reduce the long-term vulnerability of these systems to climate change. (IPCC 2000a) Climate AdaptationOnline Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicWhy is it important to look at socio-economic climate vulnerability?Households that have access to resources and socialnetworks - are ‘resource-rich’- are more resilient and recovermore quickly from a stress/stimulus. Blaikie et al.Issues of poverty and inequality—or differential resourceaccess are important determinants of vulnerability. But this isnot a simple contrast between the developed and developingworld.Different groups and places within countries differ in theirability to adapt and that divisions between rich and poortranslate into differentials in people’s ability to adjust and inaccess to adjustments. The focus should then be on poorpeople, rather than a focus on poor countries,Vulnerability “is not exclusively related to poverty” and thatboth the wealthy and the poor can be adversely affected bythe impact of extreme weather events. Blaikie, P., Cannon, T., Davis, I. and Wisner, B. 1994. At Risk: Natural Climate Adaptation Hazards, People’s Vulnerability, and Disasters. London: Routledge.Online Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicWhy is it important to look at socio-economic climate vulnerability?The interaction of climate change and the process of economic globalisation is resulting form of“double exposure,” from which a complex sets of “winners and losers” is arising (O’Brien andLeichenko 2000).The concept of “double exposure” is important in regions that are characterised by economicmarginalization and high-risk environments: here people may be potential “double losers”. In othercontexts, economic gains experienced as a result of globalisation can be offset by damages resultingfrom climate change.The important point is that the“winners” and “losers” resultingfrom the interaction of the twoprocesses may be different fromthe set of “winners” and “losers”which are identified when each ofthe two processes is examinedindependently. O’Brien, K. and Leichenko, R. 2000. “Double Exposure: Assessing the Impacts of Climate Change Within the Context of Globalization.” Global Environmental Change 10: 221 - 232. Climate AdaptationOnline Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicSocio-economic climate vulnerability dataData on trends in human and societalconditions can be obtained frompublished and unpublished institutionaland governmental databases (e.g.,National Bureaus of Statistics, likeStatistics Norway, Statistics Sweden etc)and from research in fields such asanthropology, sociology, politicalscience, economics, and indigenousstudies. Climate AdaptationOnline Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicSocio-economic climate vulnerability dataAn in-depth analysis of human and societal trends requires awide array of data sources:• Economic data• Employment• Trade, imports, exports,• Processing and sale of natural/other resources.• Public health information• Census data - general demographics, education, family structure, employment, and migration patterns.• Election data - trends in governance and the implementation and enforcement of policies• Surveys and interviews with local people Source: Arctic Climate Impact Assessment, ACIA, 2004 Climate AdaptationOnline Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicUtilising existing ‘standard’ methodologiesSomewhere ‘behind’ all forms of public planning lies - eitherimplicitly or explicitly - some sort of societal change scenariothinking.To avoid wasting resources, start by looking for what is already onthe table before developing something totally new!The challenge then is to ask the following question… How does the expected societal changes that come out of the scenario affect climate vulnerability in society?The other option is, of course, to develop a specialised societalchange scenario for the specific purpose of assessing climatevulnerability. Climate AdaptationOnline Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicExample climate vulnerability societal change scenario model Source: model developed by Western Norway Research Institute and Eastern Norway Research Institute for the Norwegian Association of Local and Regional Authorities Climate AdaptationOnline Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicExample climatevulnerability societalchange scenario:Flooding in CaliforniaTable taken from apresentation on Socio-economic vulnerability toclimate change, delivered byEli Moore Pacific InstituteOctober 19th, 2011.http://dialogue4health.org/webforums/PDFs-10-19-11/Moore.pdf Climate Adaptation Online Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicExample climatevulnerability societalchange scenario:Flooding in CaliforniaTable taken from apresentation on Socio-economic vulnerability toclimate change, delivered byEli Moore Pacific InstituteOctober 19th, 2011.http://dialogue4health.org/webforums/PDFs-10-19-11/Moore.pdf Climate Adaptation Online Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicExample climatevulnerability societalchange scenario:Flood damage categories(Smith and Ward 1998:35) Smith, K. and Ward, R., 1998, Flood, Physical Process and Human Impacts, Chichester, John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Climate AdaptationOnline Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicExample climatevulnerability societalchange scenario:Flood damage categories(Smith and Ward 1998:35) Smith, K. and Ward, R., 1998, Flood, Physical Process and Human Impacts, Chichester, John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Climate AdaptationOnline Training Resource
  • Process Stage 1Analysing Climate Vulnerability: Socio-EconomicFinal key points• The vulnerability of tomorrows society to climate change will differ from the vulnerabilities of todays society.• Vulnerability “is not exclusively related to poverty” and that both the wealthy and the poor can be adversely affected by the impact of extreme weather events.• The “winners” and “losers” resulting from the interaction of the processes of climate change and globalisation may be different from the set of “winners” and “losers” which are identified when each of the two processes is examined independently. Climate AdaptationOnline Training Resource