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Information Architecture & Why you care about it as a designer
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Information Architecture & Why you care about it as a designer

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The Art Institute of Dallas recently added IA courses to their design and multimedia degree plans. I worked with the instructors to revise the curriculum to make it more relevant to actual practice. …

The Art Institute of Dallas recently added IA courses to their design and multimedia degree plans. I worked with the instructors to revise the curriculum to make it more relevant to actual practice. I also give the introduction lecture.

This presentation is not intended to make converts but rather to expose designers to the role of IA, help them understand the value and be able to identify them in the wild.

Published in: Business, Technology

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  • 1. Information Architecture & Why You Care About It As a Designer
  • 2. The structural design of an information space to facilitate task completion and intuitive access to content. Definition Information Architecture for the World-Wide Web Louis Rosenfeld & Peter Morville Organizing info so people can find stuff >
  • 3. Metaphor – Painterliness vs. Draftsmanship Detail from Water Lilies Claude Monet 1906
  • 4. Metaphor – Painterliness vs. Draftsmanship Detail from The Entombment Raphael 1507
  • 5. Metaphor – Painterliness vs. Draftsmanship Detail from The Entombment Raphael 1507
  • 6. The Key is Balance A beautifully designed interface might satisfy the business vision but imply things about the function of a site that can’t be realized An elegantly coded back-end system might meet basic business requirements and still be wholly un-usable
  • 7. The Role In Context
    • IA is about Applied Usability
    • Content Organization : structure & labeling
    • Interaction Design : page-level elements
  • 8. The Role In Context
    • IA is about Applied Usability
    • Content Organization : structure & labeling
    • Interaction Design : page-level elements
  • 9. The Context of Development It doesn’t matter what development processes your client or your company subscribe to. They all have the same thing in common Plan Build IA IA Idea
  • 10. The Context of Development We’re going to focus on the first gap between an Idea and a Plan Idea Plan Build IA IA
  • 11. Steps
    • Requirements come from multiple sources.
      • Some are formal
      • Some are random
      • Some are completely off the wall !
    Gather | Qualify | Organize | Validate | Interaction
  • 12. Steps: Feature List Gather | Qualify | Organize | Validate | Interaction Granular breakdown and description of all potential features and functions
  • 13. Gather | Qualify | Organize | Validate | Interaction Steps
    • Scrutinize the requirements against three facets:
      • User Value
      • Business Value
      • Technical Risk
    • Use the outcome to determine your scope
  • 14. Steps: Feature Analysis Gather | Qualify | Organize | Validate | Interaction
    • Evaluation of each element:
      • Removes Bias
      • Considers Constraints
  • 15. Steps
    • Organize the features and functions into some kind of framework
      • Process Flows for Linear Applications
        • EX: E-Commerce Check-Out
      • Site Maps for Information Sites
        • EX: Corporate Information Site
      • Page Flows to translate processes into pages
        • EX: Catalog Index
    Gather | Qualify | Organize | Validate | Interaction
  • 16. Steps: Process & Page Flow Gather | Qualify | Organize | Validate | Interaction Page Agnostic Page Specific Better for Linear Applications
  • 17. Steps: Site Map Gather | Qualify | Organize | Validate | Interaction Better for Broad Content Sites
  • 18. Steps Review your framework with the technical team to validate the way the system will support it Are there any constraints that might influence the way the user will be able to encounter the information? Gather | Qualify | Organize | Validate | Interaction
  • 19. Steps Create a low-risk model of a page to account for the features and functions that have been scoped. This is the first time that the team will be able to see and think of the site in terms of pages. Gather | Qualify | Organize | Validate | Interaction
  • 20. Steps: Wireframe Gather | Qualify | Organize | Validate | Interaction Functional Model, Few if any Design Elements
  • 21. Why Do You Care? IAs promote the expertise of design by couching its impact in terms of usability Form Follows Function – IAs establish the function of a page independent of design elements. This keeps the client from designing for you IAs provide the framework to inform a solid design scheme Your grade depends on it
  • 22. Q & A