Important Irish Art 26th march 2014
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Important Irish Art 26th march 2014

Important Irish Art 26th march 2014

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Important Irish Art 26th march 2014 Important Irish Art 26th march 2014 Presentation Transcript

  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 1 Wednesday 26th March 2014 Important Irish Art
  • 2 Front Cover Patrick hennessy Lot 28 Opposite Louis le Brocquy Lot 62 (1 of 36) Page 2 Colin Middleton Lot 65 Page 5 Paul Henry Lot 74 Page 135 Robert lowe Stopford Lot 93 (Detail) Page 139 Norah McGuinness Lot 9 Inside Back Cover Gerard Dillon Lot 37 Back Cover Colin Middleton Lot 66
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 3 Important Irish Art Auction Wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm
  • 4
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 5 AUCTION Wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6.00pm VENUE Adam’s Salerooms 26 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. Ireland Viewing Highlights MArch 6th - 13th At The Ava Gallery, Clandeboye Estate, Bangor, Co. Down BT19 IRN Monday - Friday 11.00am - 5.00pm Saturday 8th March 2.00pm - 5.00pm Sunday 9th March 2.00pm - 5.00pm Full Sale Viewing March 23rd - 26th At Adam’s, 26 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. Sunday 23rd March 2.00pm - 5.00pm Monday 24th March 10.00am - 5.00pm Tuesday 25th March 10.00am - 5.00pm Wednesday 26th March 10.00am - 5.00pm Important Irish Art
  • 6 Brian Coyle FSCSI FRICS CHAIRMAN Eamon O’Connor BA DIRECTOR e.oconnor@adams.ie Nick Nicholson CONSULTANT n.nicholson@adams.ie James O’Halloran BA FSCSI FRICS MANAGING DIRECTOR j.ohalloran@adams.ie David Britton BBS ACA DIRECTOR d.britton@adams.ie Abigail Bernon BA FINE ART DEPARTMENT abigail@adams.ie Kieran O’Boyle BA Hdip ASCSI FINE ART DEPARTMENT MANAGER k.oboyle@adams.ie Stuart Cole MSCSI MRICS DIRECTOR s.cole@adams.ie You can now create your own account with us by signing up and registering your particulars online at www.adams.ie The process involves uploading identification by way of passport or driving licence and supplying valid credit card information. This is a once off request for security purposes, and once the account is activated you will not be asked for this information again. You can leave absentee bids online, and add, edit or amend bids accordingly as well as other useful functions including paying your invoice. CREATE A ‘MY ADAM’S’ ACCOUNT 26 St. Stephen’s Green , Dublin 2. Tel +353 1 6760261 Fax +353 1 6624725 info@adams.ie www.adams.ie Est1887 Ronan Flanagan FINE ART DEPARTMENT ronan@adams.ie Caroline Kevany BA FINE ART DEPARTMENT caroline@adams.ie
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 7
  • 8 1. Estimates and Reserves These are shown below each lot in this sale. All amounts shown are in Euro. The figures shown are provided merely as a guide to prospective purchasers. They are approximate prices which are expected, are not definitive and are subject to revision. Reserves, if any, will not be any higher than the lower estimate. 2. Paddle Bidding All intending purchasers must register for a paddle number before the auction. Please allow time for registration. Potential purchasers are recommended to register on viewing days. 3. Payment, Delivery and Purchasers Premium Thursday 27th March 2014, 10.00am - 5pm Under no circumstances will delivery of purchases be given whilst the auction is in progress. All purchases must be paid for and removed from the premises not later than 5pm on Thursday 27th March 2014 at the purchaser’s risk and expense. After this time all uncollected lots will be removed to commercial storage and additional charges will apply.. Auctioneers commission on purchases is charged at the rate of 20% (exclusive of VAT). Terms: Strictly cash, bankers draft or cheque drawn on an Irish bank. Cheques will take a minimum of five workings days to clear the bank, unless they have been vouched to our satisfaction prior to the sale, or you have a previous cheque payment history with Adam’s. Purchasers wishing to pay by credit card (Visa & Mastercard) may do so, however, it should be noted that such payments will be subject to an administrative fee of 1.5% on the invoice total. American Express is subject to a charge of 3.65% on the invoice total. Debit cards including laser card payments are not subject to a surcharge, there are however daily limits on Laser card payments. Bank Transfer details on request. Please ensure all bank charges are paid in addition to the invoice total, in order to avoid delays in the release of items. Goods will only be released upon clearance through the bank of all monies due. Artists Resale Rights (Droit de Suite) is NOT payable by purchasers. 4. VAT Regulations All lots are sold within the auctioneers VAT margin scheme. Revenue Regulations require that the buyers premium must be invoiced at a rate which is inclusive of VAT. This is not recoverable by any VAT registered buyer. 5. It is up to the bidder to satisfy themselves prior to buying as to the condition of a lot. Whilst we make certain observations on the lot, which are intended to be as helpful as possible, references in the condition report to damage or restoration are for guidance only and should be evaluated by personal inspection by the bidder or a knowledgeable representative. The absence of such a reference does not imply that an item is free from defects or restoration, nor does a reference to particular defects imply the absence of any others. The condition report is an expression of opinion only and must not be treated as a statement of fact. Please ensure that condition report requests are received before 12 noon on Saturday 22nd March as we cannot guarantee that they will be dealt with after this time. 6. Absentee Bids We are happy to execute absentee or written bids for bidders who are unable to attend and can arrange for bidding to be conducted by telephone. However, these services are subject to special conditions (see conditions of sale in this catalogue). All arrangements for absentee and telephone bidding must be made before 5pm on the day prior to sale. Cancellation of bids must be confirmed before this time and cannot be guaranteed after the auction has commenced. Bidding by telephone may be booked on lots with a minimum estimate of €500. Early booking is advisable as availability of lines cannot be guaranteed. 7. Acknowledgments We would like to acknowledge, with thanks, the assistance of Dr. S.B.Kennedy, Karen Reihill, Dickon Hall, Dr. Róisín Kennedy, Philip Flanagan, Dr. Denise Ferran and Claire Dalton whose help and research were invaluable in compiling many of the catalogue entries. 8. All lots are being sold under the Conditions of Sale as printed in this catalogue and on display in the salerooms IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR PURCHASERS
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 9 1 Peter Curling (b.1955) Ireland’s Best Watercolour, 49.5 x 73.5cm (19½ x 29”) Signed Provenance:The Tryon Gallery, London where purchased in 1986. Literature: Collecting Sporting Art edited by J. N. P. Watson published by Sportsman’s Press, London, illustrated p.44. This work was one of six paintings chosen by Curling for the Injured Jockey Fund Calendar 1998. €4,000 - 6,000
  • 10 2 Terence P. Flanagan RHA PPRUA (1929-2011) Lough Erne, Winter Series (1968/69) Oil on board, 73 x 107cm (28¾ x 41¾”) Signed Provenance: Viola, Duchess of Westminster, Ely Lodge, Lough Erne, Co. Fermanagh Exhibited: This is thought to be the work Lough Erne, Winter (2) exhibited at the Tom Caldwell Gallery, Belfast, 1970 Viola, Duchess of Westminster (1912-1987) lived at the family seat, Ely Lodge just west of Enniskillen in Co. Fermanagh. She served as Lord Lieutenant of Fermanagh from 1979 until her tragic death in a car accident near Dungannon in Co.Tyrone in 1987. She was well liked locally and was a great supporter of the arts. The Duchess commissioned T.P. Flanagan, who was born in Enniskillen and had his studio just across the border in Donegal, to do a series of works around Ely Lodge in the early 1970s but this is an earlier work of Lough Erne by the artist. Our thanks to the artist’s son Philip for his assistance in cataloguing this lot. €1,500 - 2,500
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 11 3 Arthur Armstrong RHA (1924-1996) Figures in a Brown Landscape Oil on board, 76 x 61cm (30 x 24”) Provenance: Viola, Duchess of Westminster, Ely Lodge, Lough Erne, Co. Fermanagh Exhibited: Arthur Armstrong Exhibition, Tom Caldwell Gallery, Belfast, Sept-Oct 1970, Cat. No. 13, organised in association with the Hendriks Gallery, Dublin (label verso) Arthur Armstrong was largely self-taught and a superb natural draughtsman. A life-long devotion to Braque accounted for an increasing abstraction in his work during the 1940s and ‘50s. He was inspired by the west of Ireland landscape and in particular Connemara and this saw a return to pure landscape painting during this period. Formerly happy as a figurative painter, Armstrong had strayed away from figures in his work. The early ‘70s saw their slow return and one can see their successful re-employment here. Their scale shows the artist breaking new ground,offering ideas on human existence. This is one of several works on this theme which were carried out in various mediums including mixed media with plaster. In the present work Armstrong’s figures seem consumed by the landscape, similarly in another work entitled “Figures in a Landscape” which was included in the same exhibition and sold in these rooms 28th September 2005 (Lot 7). €3,000 - 5,000
  • 12 4 Colin Middleton RHA RUA MBE (1910-1983) Lough Erne - March (1969) Oil on board, 90 x 90cm (36 x 36”) Signed Provenance: Viola, Duchess of Westminster, Ely Lodge, Lough Erne, Co. Fermanagh Exhibited: Colin Middleton Exhibition, David Hendriks Gallery, Dublin, October 1970, Cat. No. 32 Colin Middleton Retrospective,The Ulster Museum, Belfast, Jan-Feb 1976 and The Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin, March-April 1976, Cat. No. 111 The Duchess had a number of works by Colin Middleton in her collection and donated An Ulster Landscape by him to the National Trust’s property ‘Florence Court’ nearby in Co. Fermanagh. This house has close associations with the Duchess as she is credited with saving the wonderful rococo plasterwork ceiling in the dining room and much of the house’s contents when she organized a human chain to remove them during the fire there in 1955.It is appropriate that she is remembered there through a work by Middleton which hangs upstairs in the house. The 1960s were a period of re-building for Colin Middleton after the setbacks of the second part of the 1950s. He began again to exhibit regularly, moved back to Belfast and was by now regarded one of the leading painters working in Ireland.His work had also become increasingly concerned with landscape and even the paintings that have clear references to the figure,almost always female, usually relate it to forms associated with the landscape. Lough Erne was a favourite subject for Middleton at this time; he had a caravan at Castle Archdale and visited it for family holidays when he fished and painted. His Lough Erne paintings suggest recollections of the landscape built up over a long period of familiarity and the experience of changing light and weather conditions and indeed Middleton never actually painted outdoors, preferring to make small drawings and watercolours to record motifs and colour, before working on paintings in the caravan or at home. Lough Erne: March is on one of the largest formats on board on which Middleton painted. Like many of these square landscape paintings from the 1960s and 1970s a strong series of horizontals dominate and create a sense of space,while subtler repeated vertical strokes suggest gradations of light and texture within a more detailed exploration of the place. A strong shaft of sunlight draws the eye to the horizon where it illuminates a narrow blue line of hills, but it also adds a luminous sheen to the reedy edge of the lake in the foreground and middle distance.While clearly derived from the experience of specific places and moments,the present painting exemplifies how Middleton’s landscapes of this period are also explorations of abstract forms and effects that interested the artist. Dickon Hall, March 2014 €6,000 - 10,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 13
  • 14 5 Colin Middleton RHA RUA MBE (1910-1983) Estuary, West Cork Watercolour, 30 x 30cm (11¾ X 11¾”) Signed and dated ‘71. Signed again, inscribed with title and dated July 1971 verso €1,000 - 2,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 15 6 Charles Brady HRHA (1926-1997) Haycock Oil on canvas, 43 x 38cm (17 x 15”) Signed, also signed verso on backing board Provenance: Babcock Gallery, New York €800 - 1,200
  • 16 7 Georgina Moutray Kyle RUA (1865-1950) Market Scene, Brittany Oil on board, 35 x 46.5cm (13¾ x 18¾”) Born at Craigavad, Co. Down, Georgina Moutray Kyle was educated at home by governess and tutors. After attending the Colarossi’s studio in Paris in the 1880’s, she travelled widely before retuning to Ireland with a distinctly modern palette and post-impressionist style. She also exhibited works of Concarneau and Quimperle at the RHA and the Belfast Society. In 1930 the artist was represented in the Irish Exhibition at Brussels, and where the Belfast Museum and Art Gallery bought “The Market, Concarneau” which had been exhibited in the Paris Salon in 1924. She became an active committee member of the Belfast Art Society (later called the Ulster Academy of Arts) and was a dominant persona in Belfast exhibitions in the 1920’s and 30’s. €800 - 1,200
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 17 8 Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964) The Market Nazaré Oil on canvas, 51 x 61cm (20 x 24”) Signed. Inscribed artist’s label verso Provenance: Important Irish Art Sale these rooms 27th September 1995 Cat. No. 20 where purchsed by current owner. €4,000 - 6,000
  • 18 9 Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980) Winter in the West Oil on board, 50 x 65cm (20 x 25½”) Signed Exhibited: The Royal Hibernian Academy Annual Exhibition 1961, Cat. No. 115, where purchased; Twelve Irish Painters Exhibition, New York 1963; and Norah McGuinness Retrospective Exhibition,Trinity College Dublin, Oct/Nov 1968, Cat. No. 69 Winter in the West is a skilfully composed painting of large black and white seabirds feeding on marshy sandbanks. Behind, the tall rectangular shapes of buildings suggest the outskirts of a town. The composition is framed by lofty swaying grasses. Their large scale emphasises the unusual perspective of the painting, contrasting as it does with the comparatively tiny forms of the birds and houses in the distance. This is a bird spotter’s viewpoint. Dark grey skies contrast with the symphony of browns and greens that dominate the rest of the composition.The mud-flat is made of interconnecting blocks of differing tones which is ultimately indebted to McGuinness’s application of a Cubist aesthetic.The geometry of its structure,and that of the houses behind,is at variance with the loose handling of the paint elsewhere in the work, especially the plants in the foreground. This divergence of brushstrokes enriches the overall mood and range of the painting.The childlike forms of the birds, the focus of the work, add a note of exoticism to the scene. The painting was included in the Arts Council’s exhibition, Twelve Irish Painters that was shown in New York in 1963. McGuinness’s work was greatly admired for its modern qualities in the post- war period. Anne Crookshank summarised its ability to challenge conventional ideas of the Irish landscape and especially, as in this painting, the West. According to Crookshank, she ‘creates a landscape art which is far more enduring, alive and Irish than all the cottages and turf stacks which still sadly occupy so much gallery space in Dublin’.[1] Dr. Róisín Kennedy, March 2014 [1] Anne Crookshank, Norah McGuinness Retrospective Exhibition,Trinity College Dublin, 1968. €10,000 - 15,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 19
  • 20 10 Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980) Flight (1962) Oil on canvas, 71 x 50cm (28 x 19½”) Signed and dated ‘62 Exhibited: The Royal Hibernian Academy Annual Exhibition 1962, Cat. No. 138, where purchased Its strong sense of design and its consciously modern treatment of the subject makes Flight,a distinctively Norah McGuinness painting.It suggests a late autumnal scene, with dark silhouettes of trees against an expanse of air, filled with the black forms of departing birds.The sky, an abstract study of the colour blue in all its tones, forms a vivid backdrop to the stark black structure of the branches and the diagonal sweep of the birds in flight.The cool tones of the upper part of the composition are contrasted by the warm greens, reds and yellows of the ground in the lower left foreground and in the cascading red shapes that emerge from the branches of the trees, like falling leaves or splashes of November colour. The structured arrangements of the different elements of the composition reveal McGuinness’s familiarity with Cubism which she had acquired in Paris in the late 1920s while a student at André Lhote’s academy. Although the style only made a marginal impact on her earlier work, she renewed her interest in the aesthetic in the later 1950s and early 1960s in paintings such as this.Cubism allowed her to simplify form. Combined with her fundamental sense of design it produces in Flight a tightly constructed and evocative work. The painting knowingly engages in a progressive way with the traditional subject of landscape. It focuses on an intimate view of nature, the trees, the birds and the sky, using understated but a highly expressive combination of colour and form. In 1980 James White summarised McGuinness’s ability to abstract from nature:‘...more than any of her Irish contemporaries,she was able to impose her own will on her pictures, so that the dominating pattern of the underlying form is little apparent. ‘ [1] Dr. Roisin Kennedy, March 2014 [1] James White Norah McGuinness. An Appreciation,Irish Times,24 November 1980. €8,000 - 12,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 21
  • 22 11 Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980) Lapwings at Balbriggan Oil on canvas, 50 x 70cm (20 x 28”) Signed Exhibited: “Norah McGuinness Exhibition”,The Dawson Gallery, Dublin, Sept 1975, Cat. No. 25, where purchased Exhibited at one of McGuinness’s last one-woman shows at the Dawson Gallery, Lapwings at Balbriggan deals with a favourite subject of the artist, birds on the seashore. Living at York Road in Dun Laoghaire, the artist frequented the beaches of county Dublin from which she created a series of studies of gulls, lapwings and seabirds feeding on the damp marshlands of the bay. This work is based on the coastline of north county Dublin.As James White put it,‘The sandy shores and white Irish skies were her constant backgrounds and skill and know-how were her brushstrokes’. [1] Her earliest landscapes were painted on site in the open air but paintings such as this are primarily studio works. Distilled from chalk sketches and colour notes, it shows McGuinness more preoccupied with ‘describing only the essential features and details of the scene’ [2] , rather than creating a conventional topographical landscape. Using a high viewpoint the features of the view are laid out.Its details are condensed into a series of strong interlocking shapes and colours. The undulating line of the water and sea is contained by the distant green coastline and the yellow sandbanks. The schematised forms of the birds with their strange crested heads and the decorative colours and details of the stones and the grasses in the foreground lend the scene a distinctly exotic aura. Above all the intense yellow, harmonised with greens and browns, transforms a familiar sight into a vibrant painting, evocative of the intense sense of modernity that lies at the heart of McGuinness’s work. Dr. Róisín Kennedy, March 2014 [1] James White Norah McGuinness. An Appreciation, Irish Times, 24 November 1980. [2] Anne Crookshank, Norah McGuinness Retrospective Exhibition, Trinity College Dublin, 1968. €8,000 - 12,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 23
  • 24 12 Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980) Woman with Carrots Watercolour, 25.75 x 36cm (10¼ x 14¼”) Signed. Inscribed with title verso €1,500 - 2,500
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 25 13 Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980) Portsalon, Co. Donegal (c.1930’s) Oil on canvas, 46 x 56cm (17¾ x 22”) Detached artists’ label verso inscribed with title, price £14.4.0 and address: Bell Steps, Hammersmith Terrace, W6 Provenance: A gift from the artist to the present owner’s father, who was an apprentice to McGuinness during her time as display director in the 1940’s at Brown Thomas, Dublin; thence by descent €3,000 - 5,000
  • 26 14 Father Jack P. Hanlon (1913-1968) Montmartre, Paris Watercolour, 34.5 x 44cm (13½ x 17¼”) Signed €500 - 700 15 Father Jack P. Hanlon (1913-1968) Boats, Le Havre Watercolour, 35.5 x 52cm (14 x 20½”) Signed and dated ‘59 Dawson Gallery label verso €700 - 1,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 27 16 Basil Ivan Rákóczi (1908-1979) Continental Streetscapes with Figures A pair, Ink and Watercolour, each 47 x 30.5cm (18½ x 12”) Signed €800 - 1,200
  • 28 17 Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955) Christ is Condemned to Death Oil on board, 76 x 61cm (30 x 24”) Signed Provenance:The Dawson Gallery, Dublin €2,000 - 3,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 29 18 Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955) The Holy Family Oil on board, 51 x 41 cm (20 x 16”) Provenance:The Dawson Gallery, Dublin €3,000 - 5,000
  • 30 19 Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955) Christ Meeting the Women of Jerusalem on the Way to Calvary Gouache, 30.5 x 58.5cm (12 x 23”) Signed €2,000 - 3,000 20 Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955) Christ Falls for the First Time Gouache, 30.5 x 58.5cm (12 x 23”) Signed Provenance:The Dawson Gallery, Dublin €1,500 - 2,500
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 31 21 Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955) Pentecost Triptych, Gouache, each 39 x 18cm (15.4 x 7”) Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin €3,000 - 5,000
  • 32 21A Mainie Jellett (1897-1944) Rug Design Gouache, 30 x 14cm (11¾ x 5½”) Provenance: Jorgensen Fine Art, Dublin; where purchased by the current owner €1,000 - 1,500 21B Edward Montgomery O’Rorke Dickey HRUA HRCA CBE (1894-1977) The Farm Gate Pen, ink and monochrome wash, 20.5 x 27cm (8 x 10.5”) Signed Born in Belfast, Dickey studied painting under Harold Gilman at the Westminster School of Art. He exhibited widely in Ireland during the early 1920’s, including at the first exhibition of the Society of Dublin Painters along with Paul Henry, Letitia Hamilton and Jack B Yeats. €200 - 300
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 33 22 Nano Reid RHA (1900-1981) Stoney Beach and Bathers (1974) Oil on board, 47 x 91 cm (18.5 x 36’’) Signed Provenance:‘Bank of Ireland Collection Sale’, Adam’s, 24th November 2010, Lot 21, where purchased by the current owner Exhibited: Nano Reid Retrospective, Municipal Gallery Dublin, Nov-Dec 1974; Ulster Museum, Jan-Feb 1975, catalogue no. 107 Nano Reid Exhibition, Oct/Nov 1976, cat. no. 9 under the title Bathers on a Desolate Shore Irish Art 1943-1973, Cork ROSC 1980, cat. no. 91 On Reflection-Modern Irish Art 1960’s-1990’s,The Crawford Gallery, Cork, Aug-Oct 2005; and after wards at Galway City Museum, 2006 Literature: Cork ROSC 1980 catalogue full page illustration, plate 14 page 53 On Reflection, full page illustration, page 68 €4,000 - 6,000
  • 34 23 Doreen Dickie (b.1902) An Irish Arts & Crafts Movement oxidised copper candlestick converted to a table lamp, the dished top above tapering shaft with inset rectangular cloisonné enamel plaques depicting flowers, raised on a domed circular spreading foot 38cm (15”) high to fitting Provenance: Collection of Mrs. D.P. Smith Literature: Nicola Gordon Bowe and Elizabeth Cumming, The Arts & Crafts Movements in Dublin & Edinburgh 1885-1925, page 117, No. 60 Doreen Dickie was raised at her parents house in Swords Co. Dublin . She became a student of Oswald Reeves (See lot 24) in metalwork and enamelling while at the Dublin Art School from 1922 - 28.She qualified as an art teacher and later worked in a studio above Gertrude Grew’s Dublin Art Shop in Dawson Street. €1,000 - 1,500
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 35 24 Percy Oswald Reeves (1870-1967) The Virgin, standing, in profile, on a ground of interlocking flowerheads and ivy Gouache, irregular lancet shape, 58 x 15cm (22.75” x 6”) Inscribed Oswald Reeves, Wicklow verso This is a to-scale study for his bronze memorial tablet in The Lady Chapel at St. John’s College, University of Sydney, NSW. The original tablet can be seen in the black and white image below the drawing, it was made from bronze, with copper, enamel and silver. €1,000 - 2,000
  • 36 25 Conor Walton (b.1970) Bacchus Oil on panel, 30 x 38cm (12 x 15”) Signed and dated 2000 Exhibited: Conor Walton Exhibition, Jorgensen Fine Art, Dublin, (label verso) where purchased by the current vendor €800 - 1,200 26 James English RHA (b.1946) Parsley in a Glass Oil on board, 29 x 25.5cm (11 x 10”) Signed, signed again with initials and dated Aug ‘02 verso Provenance:The Greenlane Gallery, Dingle €500 - 700
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 37 27 Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980) ‘Purple and Gold’ - Still Life Oil on canvas, 65 x 89cm (25.5” x 35”) Signed €5,000 - 8,000
  • 38 28 Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980) The Long Road Home, Connemara Oil on canvas, 53.5 x 75.5cm (21 x 29¾”) Signed Provenance: Ritchie Hendriks Gallery, Dublin November 1960 where purchased and by descent to current owner €7,000 - 10,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 39 29 Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980) The White Mare Oil on canvas, 61.5 x 89cm (24 x 35”) Signed Provenance: Important Irish Art sale, these rooms 16th June 1993 Cat. No. 32 where purchased by current owner €4,000 - 6,000
  • 40 30 Henry Robertson-Craig RHA (1916-1984) Last Customers at the Philbeach Oil on canvasboard, 25 x 35cm (9¾ x 13¾”) Signed Provenance: ‘Patrick Hennessy and Henry Robertson Craig Sale’ Christies, 10th July 1986, Cat. No. 84 (illustrated) Philbeach was a popular pub & hotel which ran in Earl’s Court, London for 27 years until 31st January 2008. €500 - 700 31 Henry Robertson-Craig RHA (1916-1984) Rocky Shore Oil on board, 32 x 40 (12½ x 15¾”) Signed Exhibited: David Hendriks Exhibition, Cork 1974, Cat. No. 15 €500 - 800
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 41 32 Henry Robertson-Craig RHA (1916-1984) A Parisian Outdoor Cafe Oil on canvas, 60 x 50cm (23½ x 19½”) Signed €2,500 - 3,500
  • 42 33 William John Leech RHA (1881-1968) From a Hotel Window Oil on canvas, 50.5 x 42cm (20 x 16½”) Signed. Inscribed with title verso William John Leech was educated at St. Columba’s College, Rathfarnham where he showed early artistic promise. He subsequently attended the Dublin Metro- politan School of Art before passing to the Royal Hibernian Academy School as a pupil of Walter Frederick Osborne (1859-1903), and from there to the Academie Julian in Paris in 1901. In the 1930’s Leech embarked on a series of pictures of various themes; still life’s, self portraits, railways, and his life long friend and partner May Botterell, who he married in 1953. From the 1930’s, Leech painted daily at his rented No. 4 Steele studio, and his greatest influence during this time were the ‘’Bloomsbury ‘’ paint- ers; Duncan Grant,Vanessa Bell and Roger Fry.Their focus was more with private than public concerns and influenced Leech to paint purely for ‘art’s sake’. In this painting the artist is viewing a quiet English country lane in the height of summer from a hotel window which has the top of an arrangement of summer flowers and grasses visible, presumably on the sill. The dappled light permeating through the verdant leaves is typically Leech as is the shadow-play through the garden gate and on to the road which is lit by wonderful sunshine. €8,000 - 12,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 43
  • 44 34 William John Leech RHA (1881-1968) Still Life of Flowers in Mirror Oil on canvas, 96.5 x 81cm (38 x 32”) Signed Another finished work verso “View of Town from a French Window” (see illustration), which some people prefer Provenance:The collection of Dr. Eileen McCarville; later in the Collection of George and Maura McClelland and on loan from them to IMMA from 1999 - 2004; Private Collection Dublin Exhibited: RHA Annual Exhibition 1932, Cat. No.179; William J. Leech exhibition,The Dawson Gallery, Dublin, May/June 1945, Cat. No.25; Irish Art 1943-1973 ROSC Cork, Aug/Nov 1980, Cat. No.70 (label verso); William John Leech: An Irish Painter Abroad, National Gallery of Ireland, Oct/ Dec 1996, Musée des Beaux Arts, Quimper, Jan/March 1997,The Ulster Mu seum, Belfast, March/June 1997, Cat. No.82 Literature: William John Leech: An Irish Painter Abroad by Denise Ferran 1996, full page illustration p247; The Hunter Gatherer, Irish Museum of Modern Art 2004, illustrated Fig.27 p.39 €10,000 - 15,000 After nearly a decade spent in France, when Leech settled in London he found himself concerned with colour, and especially in ‘trying to evolve sunlight and reflections’. When in France he had been able to capture the effects of sunlight while painting en plein air, but in London he concentrated instead on interior and flower studies and still lives. Flowers in a Mirror allowed Leech to demonstrate his command of the depiction of colour, light, shape and form. The light on the orange red gladioli and the mauve hued daisies doubly sparkle in their reflected glory, captured in the mirror behind, confusing the viewer, leading to the question what is real or reflected, what is casual or contrived. Leech’s virtuoso skill in composition also manifested itself. Though the viewer is drawn in to the many faceted light reflec- tions, Leech focused attention on the slightly off centre dominant vertical created by the earthenware vase and the stems of the flowers which is repeated in the reflected image and divides the work on the golden median principle. Similarly the deep shadow behind the edge of the white tablecloth, divides the work horizontally.The strong diagonal, created by the edge of the tablecloth, is repeated a multiplicity of times, in the bottom edge of the mirror, the reflected window frame and the reflected folds of material.This formal structure underpins this image of colourful, beautiful flowers which capture the summer sunlight for all time, long after it and the flowers and the artist have gone. We would like to acknowledge Dr. Denise Ferran, whose research and writings formed the basis of this catalogue entry.
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 45 From The McClelland Collection
  • 46 35 Maurice MacGonigal PRHA (1900-1979) A Village Street Oil on board, 29 x 39.5cm (11½ x 15½”) Signed Provenance: Goodwin Galleries, Limerick (exhibition label verso) €3,000 - 5,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 47 36 Maurice MacGonigal PRHA (1900-1979) Seagulls at Clifden Oil on board, 51 x 76cm (20 x 30”) Signed Provenance:This work has been in the current owner’s family since the 1970’s €4,000 - 6,000
  • 48 37 Gerard Dillon (1916-1971) Kathleen Joyce Oil on board, 33 x 29cm (13 x 11½”) Signed. Inscribed with title verso Exhibited : Gerard Dillon - Early Paintings of the West Exhibition, The Dawson Gallery, March 1971 Cat No 24. (Label verso) Provenance: Important Irish Art Sale, these rooms, 15th March 1990, Cat. No. 138 where purchased by the current owner In the late 1940’s Gerard Dillon with his friends, George Campbell and Daniel O’Neill entered into a stipend arrangement with Victor Waddington which allowed the artist to rent accommo- dation in the West of Ireland to execute subject matter in preparation for his solo exhibitions with the gallery. A frequent visitor to Connemara, Dillon formed friendships with the locals and also those with holiday homes in the area. Sometimes he asked his friends to act as models for his paintings, Tom Baker, Moyard, was a neighbour in the area and Island Man depicts Paddy McDonagh, who rowed Dillon to and from Inishlackan Island and Roundstone in 1951. Dillon executed three versions of his friend, Kathleen Joyce. Girl in Blue was exhibited at the Irish Club in London, 1955 and Kathleen; a monotype was exhibited with the Council for the Encouragement of Music and the Arts (CEMA), 1956. This version, Kathleen Joyce first appeared at an exhibition, Gerard Dillon and Early Paintings of The West at the Dawson Gallery in March 1971. In a pink dress, the model appears distracted by something to the right of the picture plane. She is wearing a hat, dark coat and fur collar. In the smaller version, Girl In Blue Kathleen gazes directly at the viewer in a cottage in a similar coat with the door closed. Here, the sparse furnishings,white washed walls,chickens and the rural landscape through open door, however indicate isolation. Traveling to remote parts of Connemara, Dillon was often alone for long periods of time. Whilst Dillon’s two friends, George Campbell and Daniel O’Neill were enjoying some success in the 1950’s Dillon’s quirky naïve West of Ireland images struggled to find buyers. Victor Waddington held only two solo exhibitions of his work in 1950 and 1953. In 1955, in a letter to John Hewitt, Dillon expressed his frustration at his inability to win over the public, I’m still painting away, but I sometimes ask myself for what? The answer is nearly always the same, “for my own amusement it seems like! Following the exhibition at the Dawson Gallery in 1971, critics favourably reviewed the show and Dillon wrote to his friend Patrick Kelly expressing his delight at the success of his show. Three months later following the artist’s death,Bruce Arnold remarked in The Independent, He had an inner confidence that nothing could shake and he masked it with wry good humour. The world he has left us in his paintings is one that in time we will learn to appreciate. Karen Reihill Currently researching Gerard Dillon & Friends €25,000 - 35,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 49
  • 50 38 Gerard Dillon (1916-1971) In the London Flat Oil on board, 51 x 76cm (20 x 30”) Signed. Inscribed with title verso Provenance: From the Collection of George and Maura McClelland and on loan from them to IMMA from 1999-2004; Private Collection, Dublin Exhibited: Gerard Dillon Retrospective, Droichead Arts Centre, Drogheda, Jan-Feb 2003; Art Tank Gallery, Belfast, Feb-Mar 2003, Cat. No. 26 Northern Artists from the McClelland Collection, IMMA, Dublin, 2004-2005 and toured afterwards to Droichead Arts Centre, Drogheda, 2005 Ulster Artists exhibiton Ava Gallery Clandeboye April 2010 Cat. No. 10 Gerard Dillon: Art & Friendships, Adam’s, Dublin, July 2013 and AVA Gallery, Clandeboye, August 2013, Cat. No. 8 Literature: Gerard Dillon Retrospective catalogue, 2003, full page illustration Ulster Artists exhibition 2010 Illustrated p11 Gerard Dillon: Art & Friendships, 2013, illustrated page 6 €20,000 - 30,000 After the War, Gerard Dillon returned to London to live in his sister’s Mollie’s house, which she leased from Camden Council. Mollie was obliged to restore the house and Dillon spent weeks altering his base- ment flat, which had its own independent entrance and door out to the garden where he was able to store his materials. Many of Dillon’s friends from the literary and musical world followed him to London and for a time, Gerard’s flat was a center for artists, writers and musicians to ex- change ideas and to support one another. Leading a frugal life,Dillon became accustomed to living in small spaces. Divided into three sections by a cupboard, Dillon gives the viewer an insight into his flat in the mid 1950’s. On the left, a dressing area with a radiogram,scattered records,shoes,socks,coat and hanger. In the centre, a working area of a still life of a cupboard, painting, fruit, drapery and a bird. To the right, a man in uniform is seated on the artist’s bed smoking a cigarette holding a plate. The sitter is probably the artist’s friend from Belfast, Jim Maguire in his National Service Uniform. Patrick Kelly, known as ‘Pat’ or ‘Paddy’ Kelly introduced the artist to Maguire and his family, who were were living in Winchester, Hampshire during this pe- riod. Known to take in injured stray animals, especially cats, Dillon may have asked his friend Maguire help him in the bird’s recovery by trying to coax the bird to feed from the breadcrumbs on the plate. In The London Flat belongs to a series of paintings depicting Dillon’s flat in Abbey Road. Stylistically similar to Self Contained Flat (Ulster Museum) Dillon employed a narrative theme to these images which were often self-portraits. Here the artist has included his records, clothes, working area and close friend. Also divided into three sec- tions, Self Contained Flat, depicts himself as the narrative in his daily life. In his West of Ireland images the artist’s gramophone player or feet might appear sticking out from the foreground. These interior images also signalled differences between Dillon’s urban and rural life. In particular, the changes in modernization and the advancement of technology,the juxtaposition of the radiogram in the London flat and the gramophone player in the West of Ireland. Two writers who often visited Dillon’s flat in the 1950’s, Aidan Hig- gins and Gerard Keenan described Dillon’s flat in their publications. - Higgins in Balcony of Europe, a novel published in 1972 and Keenan in Farset and Gomorrah, which was serialized in The Honest Ulsterman, 1977. Michael Longley refered to this work in a review of the exhibition for the Irish Times on the 13th April 1971, The earlier oils are of consid- erable interest. These take for their subject matter everyday life…a young soldier in an untidy bedroom. With tact and delicacy Dillon nudges prosaic and seemingly intractable material towards the condition of poetry. He has, indeed, the uncanny knack of releasing the poetry which lies locked up in such objects as socks and slippers and coat-hangers-grandchildren, these, of Van Gogh old boots!...If the title,“The Poet of Irish Painting”means any thing, then Gerard Dillon lays serious claim to it.” Karen Reihill Currently researching Gerard Dillon & friends
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 51 From The McClelland Collection
  • 52 39 Gerard Dillon (1916-1971) The Shadow Box Oil on canvas, 35 x 25cm (13¾ x 11¾”) Exhibited: Gerard Dillon Exhibition The Mercury Gallery, London April 1967 cat No 1 (Mercury Gallery label verso) James White wrote the foreword in the artist’s exhibition at the Mercury Gallery, Recently he [Gerard] has become preoccupied with clowns-Pierrots in unlikely places which, one supposes, sym- bolize the artist on his quest for himself amongst his fantasies…the degree to which the art of Dillon is involved in the subconscious is readily apparent. Gerard Dillon never liked to speak about his painting and his work from this period can be difficult to interpret. Influenced by Picasso’s depiction of the masked figure,Dillon discovered by adopting the masked Pierrot as his alter ego, it enabled him to express his ‘counter ego’or ‘shadow’. This interest in his subconscious relates to Carl Jung’s dream theory. Dillon used his dreams as a window into his unconscious enabling him to confront his fears and anxieties. Following the deaths in quick succession of his three brothers, who all died in their fifties, Gerard embarked on a personal journey to search for answers to these traumatic events. A Pierrot is depicted in an inner enclosure or empty room with different coloured walls. There are no windows or doors. A shadow appears against a white wall with its finger pointing upwards. In 1991, Arthur Armstrong, a friend commented on the artist’s works from this period he was obsessed that he was going to die young too…and was preoccupied with death in his work. In this dream the Pierrot is not equipped with his master tools, his hands. An innovative paint- er, Dillon embraced all forms and mediums in art. In 1974, in handwritten notes for a radio programme George Campbell recalled his friend’s dexterity, he had strong nimble hands that were endlessly tearing, shaping, sticking, painting or stretching. He even peeled his spuds with his hands. Could the Pierrot be walking out of his ‘box’ towards his ‘shadow’ to join his three brothers in the after life? Two months before the exhibition at the Mercury, Dillon referred to these paintings as ‘Pierrots in Poetic Fantasies”. The ‘Poetic Fantasies’ developed into highly sophisticated and complex images till the artist suffered a stroke in 1971. Karen Reihill Currently researching Gerard Dillon & Friends. €4,000 - 6,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 53
  • 54 40 Gerard Dillon (1916-1971) Captive Mixed media on board, 46 x 55.5cm (18 x 21¾”) Signed and inscribed with title verso €1,000 - 2,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 55 41 Daniel O’Neill (1920-1974) Hallowe’en Oil on board, 60 x 50cm (24 x 20”) Signed Exhibited: Thought to have been included in Daniel O’Neill Inaugural Exhibition,The Waddington Gallery Dublin 1946 Selected Works from the McClelland Collection, IMMA, Dublin, Sept 2,000-Jan 2001 Literature: Daniel O’Neill by Gena Lynam, Irish Arts Review Vol 15, 1999, illustrated page 155 The Hunter Gatherer, IMMA 2004, illustrated fig. 44 page 40 Anne Marie Keaveney writing in “The Hunter Gatherer” refers to this work :- This painting evokes the essence of Hallowe’en when the souls of the dead are said to return to earth. The painting has a cast of characters waiting in suspense, as if anticipating some momen- tous happening. The subdued colour and the nacreous quality of the paint, serve to heighten the sensation. €7,000 - 10,000 From The McClelland Collection
  • 56 42 Frederick E. McWilliam HRUA RA (1909-1992) Box I Bronze, 20cm (8”) high Signed with initials and numbered 5/5 Provenance:The Gordon Gallery, Derry, 26th November 1990 where purchased by the current owner. (Copy of the original receipt available) Exhibited : F.E. Mc William Exhibition The Waddington Gallery , London 1971 F.E. Mc William Retrospective F.E. McWilliam Retrospective travelling exhibition, Arts Council of Ireland,The Ulster Museum, April/May 1981, Douglas Hyde Gallery, May/ June 1981, Crawford Gallery, Cork, July/August 1981, Cat. No. 87 F.E. Mc William Exhibition ,The Gordon Gallery, Derry 1984 Cat. No. 1 Literature: F.E. Mc William Retrospective 1981 Illustrated P 67 The sculpture of F.E. Mc William by Denise Ferran and Valerie Holman 2012  Cat. No. 350 Frederick Edward McWilliam was an incredibly diverse artist. McWilliam did not limit himself to any single approach or movement and his constant experimentation with media and style is characteristic of this exploratory attitude. McWilliam was at the centre of an interesting and talented group of British and Irish artists in the mid 20th century. He met Henry Moore through his friend George McCann while he was still a second-year student at the Slade School of Fine Art, and they became good friends. Parallels in subject matter and formal exploration can be traced throughout their careers and Moore was a role model and mentor of sorts to McWilliam.  McWil- liam made lasting friendships with other artists living and working in London at the same time. He shared a studio with John Luke while they were both students at the Slade, and his inner circle included Francis Bacon and William Scott.   Throughout his career, McWilliam tended to work in series, exploring a theme in a succession of variations.  Characteristic of his pre and post-war sculpture was his exploration of ‘the complete fragment’, the part standing for the whole, in works described by their titles including:  Mandible (1938) and Eye, Nose and Cheek (1939; Tate Collection).  His later Legs series, including Legs Static and Umbilicus, was a more playful excursion into the same territory. While much of his sculpture focuses on his own artistic concerns there is an element of social engage- ment running through it. A large part of his career was devoted to public sculpture and these significant works have made a lasting impact in their locations in universities and hospitals in particular.  He taught sculpture at the Slade and exhibited all over the world, and although he left Banbridge in 1928, he never forgot his Irish connec- tions. His sculptures are visually intriguing, expressive and imaginative.While often Surrealist in tone, they always retain an inherent humanity at their core. Mc William had been going through a mosaic period between 1967 - 69 after which in 1969 he started one of his most successful series of small bronzes of Girls.This he continued until he commenced his Women of Belfast Series in 1972. Box I is one of the earliest pieces in the Girls series and was completed in 1969. It and the rest of the series contrasts the highly polished external surface in which he has added incised fine lines to define the female form and in this case the finely modeled interior which seems dull in comparison. We thank Dr Denise Ferran whose writings on F. E. Mc William have formed the basis for this catalogue entry. €8,000 - 12,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 57
  • 58 43 Frederick E. McWilliam HRUA RA (1909-1992) Suspend Belief (1976) Bronze, height 39cm (15”), signed with initials and numbered 2/5 Exhibited: F.E. McWilliam Exhibition,The Taylor Gallery, Dublin 1978 F.E. McWilliam Retrospective travelling exhibition, Arts Council of Ireland,The Ulster Museum, April/May 1981, Douglas Hyde Gallery, May/June 1981, Crawford Gallery, Cork, July/August 1981, Cat. No. 125 Literature: ‘The Sculpture of F.E. McWilliam’ by Denise Ferran and Valerie Holmes 2012, Cat. No. 433 (not illustrated) After working on his Women of Belfast series between 1972 - 74 Mc William turned his attention from the victims of the troubles in Northern Ireland to the survivors. A prologue to the new series Banners was a piece called Survivor which he completed early in 1975. He then started Banners - women as survivors and campaigners for peace : United as mothers across the religious and political divide we marched through towns, held rallies, galvanised speakers. This series shows again that Mc William had not lost his Ulster roots and was concerned about what was happening there. He continued with this Banner series until the end of 1976 completing thirty different pieces in the series some of which contained non-Ulster references like “Buy more art” and other witty titles. We thank Dr Denise Ferran whose various writing on F.E. Mc William which formed the basis of this catalogue entry. €8,000 - 12,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 59
  • 60 44 Oisin Kelly RHA (1915-1981) Arctic Tern Bronze on granite base with silver plaque by Desmond Byrne, 61.5cm (24¼”) high €2,000 - 4,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 61 45 John Behan RHA (b.1938) Birds in Flight Bronze on a black fossil marble plinth, 55cm high (including base) (21.6”) €2,000 - 3,000
  • 62 46 Krystyna Pomeroy (20th/21st Century) Pig Bronze, 24cm high, 48cm long (9 x 19”) Signed with initial and numbered 7/9 €1,500 - 2,500
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 63 47 Krystyna Pomeroy (20th/21st Century) Seated Hare, Black and Gold Bronze, 51.5cm (20¼”) Signed with initials and numbered 7/9 €1,500 - 2,500
  • 64 48 Mark Rode (b.1965) Man Pushing a Bicycle Bronze, 35.5cm (14”)high, unique Signed with initials Originally from Melbourne,Australia,Mark Rode studied at Queens- land College of Art and moved to England in 1998 before settling in Ireland in 2002. Having set up a foundry and studio in Co. Mayo, he has since executed a number of large scale public commissions,includ- ing the Tour de France Memorial in Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford, and the GAA Football Sculpture in Tralee, Co. Kerry. His work has been included in group shows around Ireland, including Jorgensen Fine Art, The Solomon, The Kenny Gallery, King House in Co. Roscom- mon, RHA, and The Eakin Gallery Belfast, as well as at a number of London galleries €2,000 - 3,000 49 Yann Renard Goulet RHA (1914-1999) Des Vainqueurs Irlandaise Bronze on a black fossil marble base, 12 x 17cm (not including base) (4¾ x 6¾”) Signed with initials €200 - 300
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 65 50 Desmond A. Byrne (20th/21st Century) A complete thirty-two piece silver and silver gilt chess set presented on a Kilkenny marble and limestone chessboard, 15.5 x 15.5cm (18 x 18”) with silver plaque inscribed with artist’s name, total silver weight: c.61ozs €2,000 - 4,000
  • 66 51 Francis Tansey (b.1959) Tubular Progression Acrylic on canvas, 89 x 178cm (35 x 70”) Signed, inscribed and dated 2002 verso €4,000 - 6,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 67 52 Francis Tansey (b.1959) Spatial Logic Acrylic on canvas, 101.5 x 101.5cm (40 x 40”) Signed, inscribed and dated 2002 verso €2,000 - 4,000
  • 68 53 Sean Scully (b.1945) Conversation Colour Woodcut, 93 x 129.5cm (36½ x 51”) Signed, inscribed with title, dated ‘86 and numbered 18/40 A copy of this woodcut can be found in the collection at MOMA, New York (ref. 205,1986) €3,000 - 5,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 69 54 William Scott RA (1913-1989) Blue Gouache Gouache, 35.5 x 48cm (14 x 19”) Signed and dated 1968 Exhibited: William Scott Festival Exhibition 1969,The Richard Demarco Gallery, Edinburgh, Cat. No. 20 ‘Tenth Anniversary Exhibition of Irish Art The Eakin Gallery, February 2000, Cat. No. 56 €15,000 - 20,000
  • 70 55 Tony O’Malley HRHA (1913-2003) Studio (1981) Oil on board, 61 x 91.5cn (36 x 24”) Signed with initials and inscribed ‘Studio’. Signed again twice, inscribed with title and dated 1981 verso Provenance: From the Collection of George and Maura McClelland and on loan from them to IMMA from 1999-2004; Private Collection, Dublin Tony O’Malley came late to painting after a career in banking, and was in his late 60’s and living in St Ives when George McClelland first became aware of him, prompted by fellow artist F.E. McWilliam. When they first met, O’Malley was not particularly successful, despite having painted and exhibited for thirty years, but McClelland determined to change this. He relentlessly promoted the artist between 1980 and 1983,with the result that O’Malley went from being virtually unknown in his homeland to being given an Arts Council of Ireland Travelling Exhibition and having his work in important public collections such as the Bank of Ireland, within a few years. A major ret- rospective in Dublin, Cork and Belfast in 1984 cemented his place within the context of important Irish painters of the 20th century. In the 1970’s O’Malley married his wife Jane and they spent a lot of time in the Bahamas. Influ- enced by the light and surroundings, much of his work from this time became more colourful and vibrant, moving away from the more sombre tones of his work in the 1950s and ‘60s. In 1990 he and his wife moved back to Ireland and in 1993 he was elected a Saoi of Aosdána. When he died in 2003 he was regarded as one of Ireland’s leading painters, due in no small part to the influence and support of George McClelland. The Irish Museum of Modern Art held a major retrospective of his work in 2005. €7,000 - 10,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 71 From The McClelland Collection
  • 72 The Tain Táin Bó Cuailnge is the longest and most important of the Ulster cycle of heroic tales. In September 1969 The Dolmen Press published a unique translation, largely from the eighth century Irish version, by Thomas Kinsella. (See lot 62A) The Origin of the Tain Much of early Irish literature has been lost. Much of what survives is contained in a few large manuscripts made in medieval times. Among their miscellaneous contents are four groups of stories: mythological stories relating to the Tuatha Dé Danann (‘the Tribes of the Goddess Danann’), an ancient divine race said to have inhabited Ireland before the coming of the Celts; the Ulster cycle, dealing with the exploits of King Conchobor and the champions of the Red Branch, chief of whom is Cúchulainn, the Hound of Ulster; the Fenian cycle, stories of Finn mac Cumaill, his son Oisín, and the other warriors of the Fiana; and a group of stories centred on various kings said to have reigned between the third century B.C. and the eighth century A.D. The oldest of these manuscripts - Lebor Na hUidre, familiarly known as the Book of the Dun Cow - was compiled in the monastery of Clonmacnoise in the twelfth century. It contains, in a badly flawed and mutilated text, part of the earliest known form of the Táin Bó Cuailnge. Another partial version of the same form of the story, also flawed, is contained in a late fourteenth century manuscript, the Yellow Book of Lecan. Between them these give the main body of the Táin as used in chapters II to XIV of my translation. The origins of the Táin are far more ancient than these manuscripts.The language of the earliest form of the story is dated to the eighth century, but some of the verse passages may be two centuries older, and it is held by most Celtic scholars that the Ulster cycle, with the rest of early Irish litera- ture, must have had a long oral existence before it received a literary shape and a few traces of Christian colour, at the hands of the monastic scribes. As to the background of the Táin, the Ulster cycle was traditionally believed to refer to the time of Christ.This might seem to be supported by the similarity between the barbaric world of the stories, uninfluenced by Greece or Rome, and the Le Téne Iron Age civilisation of Gaul and Britain. The Táin and certain descriptions of Gaulish society by Classical authors have many details in common: in warfare alone, the individual weapons, the boastfulness and courage of the warriors,the practices of cattle-raiding,chariot-fighting and beheading.Ireland,however,by its isolated position, could retain traits and customs that had disappeared elsewhere centuries before, and it is possible that the kind of culture the Táin describes may have lasted in Ireland up to the introduction of Christianity in the fifth century. Thomas Kinsella,The Dolmen Press, 1969 56 Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012) Cúchulainn in Warp Spasm Lithograph, 38 x 54cm (15 x 21”) Signed, dated 1969 and numbered 6/70 Exhibited: Louis le Brocquy: Lithographic Brush Drawings from The Tain Exhibition”, The Dawson Gallery, Dublin, October 1969, Cat. No. 41, where purchased by the current owner Illustrated: The Tain, Pages 151-3 €600 - 800 Lots 56 - 62 are the complete set of all ‘Tain’ Lithographs exhibited at the Dawson Gallery 1969
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 73 57 Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012) Medb Lithograph, 54 x 38cm (21 x 15”) Signed, dated 1969 and numbered 6/70 Exhibited: Louis le Brocquy: Lithographic Brush Drawings from The Tain Exhibition,The Dawson Gallery, Dublin, October 1969, Cat. No. 42, where purchased by the current owner Illustrated: The Tain, p.51 €600 - 800 58 Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012) Invisible Chariot Lithograph, 54 x 38cm (21 x 15”) Signed, dated 1969 and numbered 6/70 Exhibited: Louis le Brocquy: Lithographic Brush Drawings from The Tain Exhibition,The Dawson Gallery, Dublin, October 1969, Cat. No. 45, where purchased by the current owner Illustrated: The Tain, p.111 €600 - 800
  • 74 59 Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012) Men and Horses Lithograph, 54 x 38cm (21 x 15”) Signed, dated 1969 and numbered 6/70 Exhibited: Louis le Brocquy: Lithographic Brush Drawings from The Tain Exhibition,The Dawson Gallery, Dublin, October 1969, Cat. No. 43, where purchased by the current owner Illustrated: The Tain, p.240 €600 - 800 60 Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012) Portion of Army Lithograph, 54 x 38cm (21 x 15”) Signed, dated 1969 and numbered 6/70 Exhibited: Louis le Brocquy: Lithographic Brush Drawings from The Tain Exhibition,The Dawson Gallery, Dublin, October 1969, Cat. No. 44, where purchased by the current owner Illustrated: The Tain, p.59 €600 - 800
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 75 61 Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012) Four Epic Shields (From The Tain) (a) “Celtchar’s Comla Cartha, the Door of Battle” (b) “Sencha’s Resonant Shield, Sciatharglan” (c) “Ochán, Conchobor’s Shield, the Ear of Beauty” (d) “The Bloody Croda of Cormac” Lithographs, 38 x 54cm (21 x 15”) Each signed, dated 1969 and numbered 6/70 (4). Presented in a simple portfolio with title page and preliminaries and original catalogue from The Dawson Gallery show. Exhibited: Louis le Brocquy: Lithographic Brush Drawings from The Tain Exhibition,The Dawson Gallery, Dublin, October 1969, Cat. No. 37-40, where purchased by the current owner Illustrated: The Tain, pages 4 & 5 €2,000 - 4,000
  • 76 62 Louis Le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012) The Tain - The Complete Set of Thirty Six Lithographs (1969) Lithographs, 54 x 38cm (21 x 15”) Each signed, dated 1969 and numbered 6/70; together with the original catalogue from The Dawson Gallery show (36). Exhibited: Louis le Brocquy: Lithographic Brush Drawings from The Tain Exhibition,The Dawson Gallery, Dublin, October 1969, Cat. No. 1-36 (portfolios 1-3), where purchased by the current owner The complete set of this seminal series, consisting of portfolios 1, 2 and 3. Each portfolio contains twelve different “lithographic brush drawings”, illustrating the epic Ulster cycle of heroic tales. Printed in Dublin in 1969 by Frank O’Reilly in an edition of 70 plus one artist’s proof.The three folios of twelve lithographs each are presented in their original black clamshell cases with title pages and preliminaries. €20,000 - 30,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 77
  • 78
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 79
  • 80 62A Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012) The Tain - A Unique Translation Largely from the 8th Century Irish version by Thomas Kinsella, published by The Dolmen Press in September 1969, designed by Liam Miller with brush drawing illustrations by Louis le Brocquy. Táin Bó Cuailnge is the longest and most important of the Ulster cycle of heroic tales. Presented in its original slipcase and signed by Louis le Brocquy. €300 - 500 63 Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012) Homage à Strindberg (1982) Lithograph, 77 x 57cm (30¼ x 22½”) Signed and numbered 3/100 €400 - 600
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 81 64 Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012) Study of Samuel Beckett (1979) Aquatint, 65 x 49.5cm (25.5 x 19.5”) Sheet size Signed and numbered 31/100 €600 - 800
  • 82 65 Colin Middleton RHA RUA MBE (1910-1983) Girl with Owl (1951) Oil on canvas, 75 x 64cm (29½ x 25¼”) Signed. Signed again, inscribed with title and dated February/March 1951. (AR 108) Exhibited: Colin Middleton Paintings 1947 - 1952,Tooth Gallery, London, October/November 1952, Cat. No. 14 Colin Middleton Retrospective September 1954, organised by CEMA Belfast Museum and Art Gallery, Cat. No. 18 Literature: John Hewitt, Colin Middleton, Arts Council, 1976, illustrated p.21 Girl with an Owl belongs to the years Colin Middleton described as his ‘Ardglass / Ballymote’period and it exemplifies the intensely emotional but often ambiguous quality of his work at this time.While it belongs to the same group of paintings of female figures in a landscape as Hallowe’en and Girl with Sunflowers the presence of the bird alongside the figure connects the painting with a theme that recurs throughout Middleton’s career. Middleton uses the female archetype both as a part of the landscape and also, as in the present paint- ing, as its visual embodiment. Here the use of colour connects the figure, bird and landscape, but most striking of all is the curve of the moon that is mirrored in the eyes of the owl. This girl has her own identity (with a suggestion that she is holding a piece of paper, perhaps a letter) but she also expresses the sense of the primeval power and wildness Middleton finds within the landscape and the natural world around Ardglass.The shapes and tones of her face are repeated in aspects of the owl’s head and the bird’s claws are noticeably the same shapes as the girl’s fingers. The bird acts almost as a familiar to the female figure in Middleton’s work, perhaps suggesting innate connections with the natural world or else the purely spiritual aspect of womanhood. Middleton portrays many different types of birds, but it is interesting that he returned to the subject of a girl with an owl in the 1960s. While there are a variety of interpretations of the owl’s symbolic role in the painting, it is possible that he intended it to suggest the girl is endowed with an instinctive wisdom and understanding beyond the physical world we inhabit. This is an uncompromisingly powerful image that embodies the mood of the Ardglass period and contains many of the ideas that were central to Middleton’s work. Clearly he considered it an impor- tant work as the painting was reproduced in John Hewitt’s 1976 monograph on the artist (along with a preparatory study towards it) and it was also included in the original list that Middleton drew up by hand of the works he considered for inclusion in the touring retrospective exhibition held in that year. Dickon Hall, March 2014 €40,000 - 60,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 83
  • 84 66 Colin Middleton RHA RUA MBE (1910-1983) Paysage des Rêves Mauvais (1940) Oil on canvas, 45.75 x 61cm (18 x 24”) Signed, inscribed with title and dated (19)’40 Provenance: From the Collection of George and Maura McClelland and on loan from them to IMMA from 1999-2004; Private Collection, Dublin Exhibited: Colin Middletion: Paintings and Drawings from the McClelland Collection, IMMA, Dublin, Jan-June 2001 Northern Artists from the McClelland Collection, IMMA, Dublin, 2004-2005; Droichead Arts Centre, Drogheda, 2005 The Surreal in Irish Art, F.E. McWilliam Museum, Banbridge, May-Sept 2011; The Highlanes Gallery, Drogheda, Sept-Nov 2011 Literature:The Hunter Gatherer, IMMA 2004, illustrated fig. 61 page 53 The Surreal in Irish Art, F.E. McWilliam Museum 2011 (used as the invitation image for the exhibition), fig. 6 page 11 The world of the dream, presenting a parallel reality to our own that operates by entirely independent rules, is a staple of surrealism. The landscape of nightmares Middleton cre- ates here is full of drama and movement; perhaps the suggested fragility of the world he depicts is a reference to the wartime environment in which it was painted, where the threat of violence undermined the normal rules and logic of life. The dynamic and contorted form of the semi-clothed figure, with its broad contours of rich colour and shadow that is typical of Middleton’s early work, is dramatically set against the harsh angularity of three tall sticks that lean against each other. She falls back against a tiny ladder; pieces of material bind her to these three sticks which seem inex- plicably to support her weight, as if this is a moment frozen in time. This world is both primitive and also disturbingly mechanised; parts of the figure almost seem to dissolve into unravelling lengths of steel. An impossibly extended finger points over the top of the sticks and towards a dressing ta- ble with a broken mirror, adding a sense of violence or threat to the vast desert landscape, whose hostility is increased by the sudden gorge that seems to be at the very front of the composition, in dangerous proximity to this figure. The emotional impact of this painting is arguably as consistently strong and visceral as Middleton achieved in his surrealist work. His strength in design and illusionistic paint- ing is very apparent here but it never undermines the uneasy and threatening immediacy of the work. Dickon Hall, March 2014 €30,000 - 50,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 85 From The McClelland Collection
  • 86 67 Colin Middleton RHA RUA MBE (1910-1983) Opus I Group II: The Wilderness, Mother & Child 3 (1941) Oil on canvas, 61 x 40.5cm (24 x 16”) Signed and dated 1941, signed with artist’s device and inscribed with title verso Provenance: From the Collection of George and Maura McClelland and on loan from them to IMMA from 1999-2004; Private Collection, Dublin Exhibited: Colin Middleton Exhibition, Belfast Museum and Art Gallery, 1943, Cat. No. 14 Colin Middletion: Paintings and Drawings from the McClelland Collection, IMMA, Dublin, Jan- June 2001 Northern Artists from the McClelland Collection, IMMA, Dublin, 2004-2005; Droichead Arts Centre, Drogheda, 2005 Literature: The Hunter Gatherer, IMMA 2004, illustrated fig. 76 page 58 Colin Middleton took on the subject of the mother and child regularly throughout his career and indeed the present painting formed part of a small group of works on this subject in his 1943 exhibition.This is, however, an unusual painting both in its treatment of the figures and in its dark mood; in general, Middleton treats the relationship in a more traditional manner, depicting it as nurturing and close and expressing it as an interlocking and unified pictorial unit. Despite the mother’s left arm holding the child, there is a clear gap between the two bodies, which only appear to make contact again at the head. Intriguingly it is actually another face that seems to be locked to the mother’s lips, emerging in a ghostly fashion between the two figures, but this form is left ambiguous and unresolved. The standing child reaches as if clawing at its mother’s eyes and her body seems contorted in a tight and anguished pose. Strong red notes running across her nails, nipples, throat, hips and eyes stand out against the cold tones of the skin and maintain a high emotional pitch. The strange, foetus-like child is ambiguous, either helpless or malevolent, its eyes staring at the mother’s upturned face.The distorted and etiolated figures are unlike anything we expect from Middleton and, given the date, it might be read as expressing the traumatic grief Middleton suffered at the premature death of his first wife, Maye, in 1939 and perhaps also the fact that they had not had any children, as well as a more general expression of the pain and trauma of wartime. Dickon Hall, March 2014 €7,000 - 10,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 87 From The McClelland Collection
  • 88 68 Colin Middleton RHA RUA MBE (1910-1983) Promised Land (1947) Oil on canvas, 51 x 63.5cm, (20 x 25”) Signed and inscribed with title and dated October 1947 verso, (AR 23) Colin Middleton’s complex reaction to World War Two worked itself out in his work over more than ten years. While some paintings make specific reference to the war or are clearly influenced by it, towards the end of the 1940s a broad humanist vision begins to dominate in which the isolated and anonymous figures dispossessed by the war and suffering its horrific consequences become even more universal figures that represent universal human alienation and suffering, often in the face of social indifference. The Promised Land belongs to the very beginning of this period.The rhythmic paint surface is a reminder of Middleton’s interest in van Gogh and looks forward to the development of his work towards more energetic, looser and more heavily loaded brushstrokes. The two figures cling together as if to support themselves against the swirling energy of the sky, the woman almost naked against the harsh elements.Middleton was deeply affected by the newsreel foot- age of the liberation of the concentration camps at the end of the war and many of the figures in his work of this time seem as if they might have come from these films. It is unusual to find such a monochromatic palette as in The Promised Land, its almost electric blues heightening the tension and otherworldly mood of the work. The bareness of the landscape reflects the destruction of the war as well as increasing our sense of its victims’ helplessness within this environment where there is no shelter or food. Titles drawn from the Bible occur increasingly towards the late 1940s in Middleton’s paint- ing, bringing a wider meaning to the suffering of the figures he painted. There is a sense of hope and of redemption in these paintings. While the literal search for a promised land was a fact for many who had been forced from their own homes by the war, there is an intensity of meaning that the biblical reference brings to this timeless couple. We are reminded that this search for a new land, for peace, recurs throughout history, that we cannot look at our own time in isolation. Middleton had recently returned from his own search for a different life at a farming commune in England,so perhaps thoughts were in his mind of how much the idea of a spiritual or physical promised land ahead is a part of the human condition. Dickon Hall, March 2014 €20,000 - 30,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 89
  • 90 69 George Campbell RHA RUA (1917-1979) Dublin Airport Pen, ink and gouache, 24 x 19cm (9½ x 7½”) Signed and dated ‘52 Exhibited: Spring Exhibition, The Frederick Gallery, March 1997.This is one of a set of three works that are thought to have been commissioned by Bord Fáilte for their Ireland of the Welcomes Magazine €500 - 700 70 Trevor Geoghegan (b.1946) ‘Early Evening, Snowfield, Wicklow’ Watercolour, 8 x 16cm (3 x 6”) Signed, inscribed with title and dated 2004 €200 - 400
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 91 71 Frances Kelly ARHA (1908-2002) Flowers in Jug on Windowsill Oil on canvas, 75 x 54.5cm (29½ x 21½”) Signed €1,000 - 2,000
  • 92 72 George Russell Æ (1867-1935) Two Figures in the Woods Oil on canvas, 40 x 52.5cm (15¾ x 20¾”) Signed with monogram €2,000 - 4,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 93 73 George Russell Æ (1867-1935) Bather in The Wood Oil on canvas, 40.5 x 53.5cm (16 x 21”) Signed with monogram, Daniel Egan Gallery label verso Exhibited: A Private Collection Exhibition,The Frederick Gallery, Dublin, Dec 2001, where purchased by current owner €4,000 - 6,000
  • 94 74 Paul Henry RHA RUA (1876-1958) Sailing Boat on a Lough, (1916-17) Oil on canvas, 35.5 x 40.5cm (14 x 16”) Signed Provenance: From the collection of George & Maura McClelland and on loan from them to IMMA from 1999 - 2004; Private Collection Dublin Exhibited: Possibly Pictures of the West of Ireland by Mr. & Mrs. Paul Henry, Mills’ Hall, Dublin, 16-28 April 1917 (44, as “The Sound”) Literature: S. B. Kennedy, Paul Henry: with a catalogue of the Paintings, Drawings, Illustrations, New Haven and London, Yale University Press, 2007, p. 190, catalogue number 444. Reviewing Henry’s 1917 Dublin exhibition the “Freeman’s Journal”(16 April 1917) commented, possibly of this picture, with its solitary sail gliding over the dancing waters. In the early 1940s Henry made two pictures similar in concept to this, namely The Fishing Boat (Kennedy, 2007, catalogue number 1057, reproduced) and Landscape with a fishing boat (Kennedy, ongoing cata- loguing of Paul Henry’s oeuvre, number 1280).The setting may be south east of Achill Sound, in which case the distant mountain is Derreen. €30,000 - 50,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 95 From The McClelland Collection
  • 96 75 Estella Frances Solomons RHA (1882-1938) The Slieve Mish Range, near Clogheen, west Kerry Oil on board, 35.5 x 45.75cm (14 x 18”) Signed Exhibited: RHA Annual Exhibition, Dublin, 1948, Cat. No. 103 Estella Solomons Exhibition, The Crawford Gallery, Cork, May/June 1986, Cat. No. 165 €800 - 1,200 76 Norman J. McCaig (1929-2001) Turf Stacks, Connemara Oil on board, 29 x 29cm (11½ x 11½”) Signed €700 - 1,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 97 77 James Humbert Craig RHA RUA (1877-1944) A Farm in the Glens Oil on canvas, 56 x 76.5cm (22 x 30”) Signed €6,000 - 8,000
  • 98 78 Fergus O’Ryan RHA ANCA (1911-1989) The Dropping Well, Milltown Oil on board, 35 x 45cm (14 x 18”) Signed. Inscribed with title verso €700 - 1,000 79 Fergus O’Ryan RHA ANCA (1911-1989) Huband Bridge, Dublin Oil on board, 40 x 50cm (15¾ x 19¾”) Signed. €800 - 1,200
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 99 80 Fergus O’Ryan RHA ANCA (1911-1989) Dublin Cityscape near Leeson Street Oil on board, 51 x 61cm (20 x 24”) Signed. €1,000 - 1,500 81 Fergus O’Ryan RHA ANCA (1911-1989) St.Stephen’s Green Gates Oil on board, 28 x 39.5cm (11 x 15½”) Signed €800 - 1200
  • 100 82 Simon Coleman RHA (1916-1995) Village Square, Duleek, Co. Meath Oil on canvasboard, 50 x 61cm (20 x 24”) Signed This work shows the village square of Coleman’s birthplace, Duleek, Co. Meath. Our thanks to Marie Bisgaard for her assistance in cataloguing the works by Simon Coleman. €600 - 800 83 Simon Coleman RHA (1916-1995) Circus near Millmount Monument, Drogheda Oil on canvasboard, 50 x 61cm (20 x 24”) Signed This view is thought to have been painted from the top of the monument - known locally as ‘The Cup and Saucer’. Our thanks to Marie Bisgaard for her assistance in cataloguing the works by Simon Coleman. €700 - 1,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 101 84 Thomas Ryan PRHA (b.1929) The Four Courts, Dublin from the South Quays Oil on canvas, 40 x 50cm (15¾ x 19½”) Signed €2,000 - 3,000 85 Thomas Ryan PRHA (b.1929) The Mill Pond at Brackenstown Mill (1979) Oil on canvas laid on board, 29 x 27cm (12 x 11”) Signed. Signed, inscribed with reference 139,79 and dated verso Inscribed artists’ studio label verso €800 - 1200
  • 102 86 David Hone PRHA (b.1928) Sunset Over Docklands, Near Ringsend Oil on canvas, 56.5 x 76.5 (22¼ x 30”) Signed €1,000 - 2,000 87 Phillip Hoye (b.1979) The Raven Oil on board, 44.5 x 35.5cm (17½ x 14”) Signed and dated ‘13 €500 - 700
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 103 88 Edward McGuire RHA (1932-1986) Bird and Skull (1954) Oil on canvas, 33 x 23cm (13 x 9”) Exhibited: IELA, 1955, Cat. No. 26 (£25) Edward McGuire RHA Exhibition, RHA Gallery, Dublin Oct- Nov 1991, Cat. No. 5A Literature: Brian Fallon, Edward McGuire, page 115, No. 12 €1,500 - 2,500
  • 104 89 Ernest Hayes RHA (1914-1978) Still Life with Canework Chair and Crate of Onions Oil on canvas, 60 x 49cm (23.6 x 19¼”) Signed and dated 1976 €800 - 1200 90 Walter Verling HRHA (b.1939) Back Garden Oil on board, 27 x 34cm (10½ x 13.4”) Signed Provenance: Collection of Raymond MacDonnell, Architect. €500 - 700
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 105 91 Mark O’Neill (b.1963) A Special Place Oil on board, 39.5 x 39.5cm (15½ x 15½”) Signed and dated 1996 €2,000 - 4,000
  • 106 92 James Malton (1761-1803) A Picturesque and Descriptive View of the City of Dublin A set of twenty five framed, hand coloured aquatints, 30 x 40cm (12 x 15.75”) together with the original volume of text, descriptions of plates and maps of the city and environs, Gilt tooled leather spine and boards, 42.5 x 56cm €8,000 - 12,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 107
  • 108 When it’s most famous son, Daniel O’Connell, was born on 7 August 1775, Cahersiveen was a tiny settlement of a few dwellings centered on his parents’ farmhouse of Carhen. However, the growth of the town during O’Connell’s lifetime and beyond was rapid as is recorded in this previous- ly little-known panoramic view by Robert Lowe Stopford (1813-1898). Much admired in his lifetime, this is one of the major works of the Cork- based artist and as an invaluable record of Cahersiveen is an important document of small town life in County Kerry. The prominence given to the church - towering above the town like some medieval cathedral - is wholly appropriate as it shows an idealized view of the Daniel O’Connell Memorial Church, built to mark the centenary of The Liberator’s death. Cahersiveen’s development owed much to the new road along the coast of Castlemaine bay and through the Iveragh Mountains to Va- lencia Island. Looking back in 1837 when the town boasted 1,192 inhabitants, the great topographer Samuel Lewis noted that ‘in 1815 there were only five houses in the entire village, but within the last ten years it has rapidly increased’. Lewis noted that the town consisted then of one principal street stretching along the main road and of two smaller streets branching from it at right angles, one of which leads down to the quay, and the other to the upper road or old village of Ca- hir, which consists only of mud cabins’. By contrast Lewis noted that the houses on the new road were ‘neatly built and roofed with slate’. Cahersiveen’s chief trade was fishing which employed four hundred people on a seasonal basis; the importation of timber, salt and iron while oats and flour were exported from some mills to the east.Overall Lewis judged that the town had a ‘lively and cheerful appearance’ and that ‘great improvements had been made in the neighbourhood’.These included an agency for transacting business with the National Bank of Ireland, a pier and a small quay built in 1822, a national school and a fever hospital and dispensary - the latter two institutions would soon be overwhelmed as, in the decade after Lewis wrote, Cahersiveen was devastated in the Great Famine. The Iveragh Peninsula was among the worst hit areas of the country and the picture of prosperity - and the church triumphant - that Stopford offers contrasts bitterly with the short journey along the road, now known as the Paupers’ Road, westward (leading from the town at the right hand side of the picture) to the workhouse at Bahaghsis. As John Crowley writes in the Atlas of the Great Irish Famine: ‘The poorest of the poor who travelled this road at the height of the Famine must have been filled with fear and trepidation. Their instinct for survival would have taken them here in the hope that their admission would bring an end to the torment’. Unfortunately the Inspector at the Workhouse was the particularly brutal Colonel Clarke who saw his mission as ‘to chastise the poor’, and an unknown number died and are buried at the nearby graveyard at Srugreana Abbey. The artist Robert Lowe Stopford was born in Dublin but spent his career in Cork, working as an art teacher and serving as a correspondent for the Illustrated London News. He specialised in topographical views of Cork and its surrounding picturesque sights such as Blackrock Castle and Youghal Strand. He also ventured into surrounding counties exhib- iting a view ‘from the Drawing Room - Lismore Castle’at the Royal Hi- bernian Academy in 1864 and also views of Killarney on two occasions. Stopford painted other locations in Kerry sending views of Brandon and Cahersiveen Bridge to the RHA (1862 and 1858). Stopford kept an al- bum of his topographical views which he used as part of his art teaching programme in Cork but the present work is clearly not based on sketches taken when he painted Cahersiveen Bridge in 1858 and he must have revisited the South Kerry town a few years later as many of the most prominent architectural features in the view were not yet built in 1858. The Royal Irish Constabulary Barracks, for example, is the prominent turreted building on the waterside at the end of the Bridge Street, guar- ding access to the crossing.This was built after the 1867 Fenian uprising (which started in the town) and was strategically important as it defen- ded Valentia Island, the end point of the transatlantic telegraph cable. The building - whose oriental appearance gave rise to the story that it had originally been planned for India and the architect’s drawings were mixed up - now houses Cahersiveen Heritage Centre. Of course the other prominent building in Stopford’s view is the church officially named for the Holy Cross, but known universally as the Daniel O’Connell Memorial Church. It is the only church in Ireland with a lay dedicatee. Plans had been laid to start the church to mark the centenary of O’Connell’s birth so close by but construction took place between 1882 and 1909 to designs by George Ashlin.The church as erected is different from Stopford’s view in several respects, but most dramatically in that the spire was never built.There is a telling parallel in this with Stopford’s view of Cobh - or Queenstown as was - showing St Colman’s domi- nating the skyline complete with its spire although this was not added until after the artist’s death (Crawford Art Gallery, Cork). Intriguingly, Ashlin was again the lead architect at St Colman’s. It is possible that the Cahersiveen and Cobh works, showing the buildings as it was planned they would look when complete, were commissioned as promotional ma- terial in fundraising efforts in the United States. Certainly exterior and interiors view of the O’Connell Memorial Church were exhibited in the Columbian Exposition, in Chicago in 1897. Perhaps though the sheer size and amount of anecdotal and extraneous material in the Cahirciveen view argues against this. The historical, social and commemorative interest of the work should not obscure its power as a complex piece of landscape and topographical painting. The mastery of the high vantage point; the control of mass- ing, detail and palette make for a highly accomplished piece of landscape painting. A Panoramic View of Cahersiveen, County Kerry with the Daniel O’Connell Memorial Church
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 109 93 Robert Lowe Stopford (1813-1898) A Panoramic View of Cahersiveen, County Kerry with the Daniel O’Connell Memorial Church Watercolour and bodycolour, 36 x 96cm (14 x 37¾“) An undated newspaper cutting from the Cork Constitution attached to the reverse of the work, attests to the contempo- rary success of the painting: “We have been shown a watercolour landscape just executed by Mr R Stopford, of this city. It repre- sents the town and Bay of Cahirciveen, showing from the telegraph station at Valentia to the remains of the house in which Daniel O‘Connell was born, the proposed new church which Canon Brosnan is endeavouring to get built to the memory of O‘Connell. Also, the residences of The Knight of Kerry, Messrs Blennerhasset and Mahony - the long bridge to the Protestant Church and Police Bar- racks, the whole forming one of the most pleasing works that we have yet seen from this well known artist. The landscape has found a ready purchaser at a good figure”. €4,000 - 6,000 (See Detail of painting on pg 135)
  • 110 94 William Henry Stopford (1842-1890) Fishermen at Sea Watercolour, 20 x 31.5cm (7¾ x 12½”) Signed with monogram and dated 1881 €300 - 500 95 Edwin Hayes RHA RI ROI (1819-1904) Ilfracombe, Penzance Cove Watercolour, a pair, 11 x 17cm each (4¼ x 6¾”) Signed and inscribed with title (2) Provenance: George Stacpoole Antiques €600 - 1,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 111 96 Rose Barton RWS (1856-1929) The Doorway Watercolour, 37 x 26cm (14.5 x 10.25”) Signed and dated 1918. Original exhibition label and Royal Society of Painters in Watercolours label verso Exhibited: Jorgensen Fine Art, Dublin €6,000 - 8,000
  • 112 97 William Percy French (1854-1920) Horn Head Watercolour, 17 x 24cm (6¾ x 9½”) Signed indistinctly.Title inscribed on William Rodman Gallery label verso €2,000 - 4,000 98 William Percy French (1854-1920) Landscape with Heather Watercolour, 17 x 24cm (6¾ x 9½”) Signed €2,000 - 4,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 113 99 William Percy French (1854-1920) A Stormy Sky Watercolour, 16 x 23.5cm (6¼ x 9¼”) Signed €2,000 - 4,000 100 William Percy French (1854-1920) The Winding Lane Watercolour, 16 x 23.5cm (6¼ x 9¼”) Signed €2,000 - 4,000
  • 114 101 Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957) The Strand Races: The Start and The Finish Hand-coloured Cuala Press prints, a pair, 14.5 x 46cm each (5¾ x 18¼”) One signed, (2) Literature: Hilary Pyle, The Different Worlds of Jack B. Yeats, Irish Academic Press, Dublin, 1994, p.283/4, cat nos. 2015-2016. The original ink and watercolour drawings for these prints date c.1906 and were exhibited in London in 1913. €600 - 800 102 Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957) The Mountain Farm and The Village Hand-coloured Cuala Press prints, a pair, 11 x 36.5cm each (4.3 x 14.3”) Both signed, (2) Literature: Pyle, Hilary, The Different World of Jack B. Yeats His Cartoons and Illustrations, Irish Academic Press, Dublin, 1994, pp.285-286 (listed) catalogue nos. 2026 & 2027 (the latter illustrated p.286) . The original ink and watercolour drawings for these prints c.1906 were exhibited in London in 1913. €600 - 800 103 Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957) The Post Car Hand coloured Cuala Press print, 24 x 32cm (9½ x 12½”) Framed Literature: Hilary Pyle, The Different Worlds of Jack B. Yeats, Irish Academic Press, Dublin, 1994, p.285, cat no. 2023. €200 - 300
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 115 104 Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957) The Dry Season after the Heavy Wet Ink on paper, 11 x 14cm (4¼ x 5½”) Signed €800 - 1,200 105 Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957) It’s all very wells, for him ter shay “Lights yer cigar at the Candle” Ink on paper, 18 x 14cm (7 x 5½”) Signed €800 - 1,200
  • 116 106 Style of James Arthur O’Connor (1792 - 1841) Wooded River Landscape with Woman on a Path Oil on canvas, 25 x 30 cm (9¾ x 11¾”) €2,000 - 3,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 117 107 James Arthur O’Connor (1792-1841) A Traveller on a Riverside Road with a Fisherman in the Distance Oil on board, 25 x 30cm (9¾ x 11¾”) Signed with initials and dated 1836 indistinctly Provenance: Biggs of Maidenhead; W.G Wilson Esq, Armagh; Christies, London,‘The Irish Sale’, May 1998, lot no. 130 €3,000 - 5,000
  • 118 108 Erskine Nicol RSA ARA (1825-1904) A Shebeen Oil on board, 24 x 34cm (9½ x 13½”) Signed and dated 1858 €1,000 - 2,000 109 William Sadler II (1782-1839) Coastal Scene Inlet with Ships and Boats Oil on panel, 22 x 30cm (8½ x 12”) Provenance: Cynthia O’Connor Gallery, Dublin where purchased c.30 years ago €1,500 - 2,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 119 110 William Sadler II (1782-1839) A View over Dublin Bay from the Dublin Mountains Oil on panel, 28 x 40cm (11 x 15¾”) €2,000 - 3,000
  • 120 111 Eva Henrietta Hamilton (1876-1960) The Alchemist Oil on canvas, 78.5 x 60cm (30¾ x 23¾”) Signed with initials Strahan of Dublin label verso €1,000 - 2,000 112 Estella Solomons HRHA (1882-1968) The Writer Oil on canvas, 76 x 54.5cm (30 x 21½”) Provenance: The Artist’s Estate. Important Irish Art Sale, these rooms, December 2001, Cat. No. 77 where purchased by current owner Exhibited: Estella Solomons Exhibition, The Crawford Gallery, Cork May/June 1986, Cat. No. 16 €1,000 - 2,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 121 113 Hugh Douglas Hamilton RHA (1739-1808) Portrait of General George Robert Gordon of New Grove, Co. Cork, in semi-profile wearing military uniform Coloured chalks over pencil, oval, 24 x 19cm (9½ x 7½”) With mss. label verso identifying the subject signed “A. Vicars, Ulster” Provenance: Mount Kennedy, and by descent in the family of Mount Kennedy Robert Gordon of New Grove, Co Cork, Surveyor General of Munster, later Commissary General of Ireland. Married Anne (d.1786) sister of Robert Cuninghame, 1st Lord Rossmore. He died 1778. €1,000 - 1,500
  • 122 114 William Mason (1906-2002) Boats in the Bay Oil on board, 29 x 43cm (11½ x 17”) Signed €800 - 1,200 115 Charles Lamb RHA RUA (1893-1964) Coastal Landscape Oil on board, 29.5 x 39cm (11¾ x 15½”) Signed Daniel Egan Gallery label verso €700 - 1,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 123 116 Bartholomew Colles Watkins RHA (1833-1891) The Gap of Dunloe, Killarney Oil on canvas, 34.6 x 50.5 cm (13½ x 19¾”) Signed on label attached verso, also inscribed on stretcher verso €1,000 - 1,500
  • 124 117 Phillipa Garner (Bayliss) (b.1940) A Musical Recital at Castletown House Oil on canvas, 45 x 60cm (17¾ x 23¾”) Signed €600 - 800 118 Patrick Leonard HRHA (1918-2005) Sunlight & Shadow, Rush, Co. Dublin Oil on board, 40.5 x 36cm (15¾ x 13¾”) Signed.Signed,inscribed and priced £8-9-0 verso €800 - 1,200
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 125 119 Seán O’Sullivan RHA (1906-1964) Studio of Paul Landowski, Paris Oil on board, 45 x 37cm (17.75 x 14.5”) Signed Dawson Gallery framing label verso Provenance: Seán O’Sullivan Sale, these rooms 2nd May 2012 where purchased by current owner, Lot No. 59 €2,000 - 4,000
  • 126 120 Kenneth Webb RWA FRSA RUA (b.1927) Sunset Bog Oil on canvas, 76 x 101.5 (30 x 40”) Signed and inscribed with title verso €8,000 - 12,000
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 127 121 Kenneth Webb RWA FRSA RUA (b.1927) Autumn, Salmon Weir, Galway Oil on canvas, 76 x 101.5cm (30 x 40”) Signed. Inscribed with title verso €8,000 - 12,000
  • 128 122 Niccolo Caracciolo RHA (1941-1989) A Tuscan Villa Watercolour, 29 x 45cm (11 ½ x 17 ¾”) With signed studio stamp on backing board Provenance:The Artists family €300 - 500 123 Niccolo Caracciolo RHA (1941-1989) Figure Study - Seated Female Nude Mixed media on paper, 38 x 27cm (15 x 10 ½”) With signed studio stamp on backing board Provenance:The Artists family €300 - 500
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 129 124 Niccolo Caracciolo RHA (1941-1989) Portrait of a Man with a Moustache Oil on board, 26 x 25.5cm (10 ¼ x 10”) With signed studio stamp verso Provenance:The Artists family €500 - 700
  • 130 125 Thomas Ryan PRHA (b.1929) King’s Inn Gate Watercolour, 23 x 29.25cm (9 x 11½”) Signed €600 - 1,000 126 James le Jeune RHA (1910-1983) The Vatican Watercolour and gouache on paper, 18.5 x 23cm (7.3 x 9”) Signed €250 - 350
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 131 127 James English RHA (b.1946) Bagno Tibeno, Capri Oil on canvas, 30.5 x 40.5cm (12 x 16”) Artist’s label verso €700 - 1,000 128 Hans Iten RUA (1874-1930) Near Glengormley Oil on board, 18 x 25cm (7¼ x 9¾”) Signed €700 - 1,000
  • 132 129 Richard Kingston RHA (1922-2003) Marsh Pastel, 20 x 14cm (8 x 5½”) Signed and dated ‘79. Signed and inscribed verso €150 - 250 130 Tom Nisbet RHA (1909-2001) A Tree in Ranelagh Watercolour, 26 x 30cm (10¼ x 11¾”) Signed. Inscribed with title verso €150 - 250
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 133 131 Tom Cullen (b.1934) Seapoint, Co. Dublin Oil on canvas, 31 x 45cm (12 x 13¾”) Signed €500 - 700
  • 134 DEFINITIONS AND GENERAL CONDITIONS Definitions 1. In these conditions the following words and expressions shall have the following meanings: ‘Auctioneer’ – James Adam & Sons. ‘Auctioneer’s Commission’ – The commission payable to the Auctioneer by the buyer and seller as specified in conditions 13 and 25. ‘Catalogue’ – Any advertisement, brochure, estimate, price list or other publication. ‘Forgery’ – A Lot which was made with the intention of deceiving with regard to authorship, culture, source, origin, date, age or period and which is not shown to be such in the description therefore in the Catalogue and the market value for which at the date of the auction was substantially less than it would have been had the Lot been in accordance with the Catalogue description. ‘Hammer Price’ – The price at which a Lot is knocked down by the Auctioneer to the buyer. ‘Lot’ – Any item which is deposited with the Auctioneer with a view to its sale at auction and, in particular, the item or items described against any Lot number in any Catalogue. ‘Proceeds of Sale’ – The net amount due to the seller being the Hammer Price of the Lot after deducting the Auctioneer’s Commission thereon under condition 25 the seller’s contribution towards insurance under condition 26, such VAT as is charge- able and any other amounts due by the seller to the Auctioneer in whatever capacity howsoever arising. ‘Registration Form or Register’ – The registration form (or, in the case of persons who have previously attended at auctions held by the Auctioneer and completed registration forms, the register maintained by the Auctioneer which is compiled from such registration forms) to be completed and signed by each prospective buyer or, where the Auctioneer has acknowledged pursuant to condition 12 that a bidder is acting as agent on behalf of a named principal, each such bidder prior to the commencement of an auction. ‘Sale Order Form’ – The sale order form to be completed and signed by each seller prior to the commencement of an auction. ‘Total Amount Due’ – The Hammer Price of the Lot sold, the Auctioneer’s Commission due thereon under condition 13, such VAT as is chargeable and any additional interest, expenses or charges due hereunder. ‘V.A.T.’ – Value Added Tax. Cataloguing Practice and Catalogue Explanations 2. Terms used in Catalogues have the following meanings and the Cataloguing Practice is as follows: The first name or names and surname of the artist; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work by the artist. The initials of the first name(s) and the surname of the artist; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work of the period of the artist and which may be in whole or in part the work of the artist. The surname only of the artist; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work of the school or by one of the followers of the artist or in his style. The surname of the artist preceded by ‘after’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a copy of the work of the artist. ‘Signed’/’Dated’/’lnscribed’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer the work has been signed/dated/inscribed by the artist. ‘With Signature’/’with date’/’with inscription’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer the work has been signed/dated/inscribed by a person other than the artist. ‘Attributed to’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer probably a work of the artist. ‘Studio of/Workshop of’ In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work executed in the studio of the artist and possibly under his supervision. ‘Circle of’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work of the period of the artist and showing his influence. ‘Follower of’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work executed in the artist’s style yet not necessarily by a pupil. ‘Manner of’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work executed in artist’s style but of a later date. ‘*’; None of the terms above are appropriate but in the Auctioneer’s opinion the work is a work by the artist named. GENERAL CONDITIONS Auctioneer Acting as Agent 3. The Auctioneer is selling as agent for the seller unless it is specifically stated to the contrary. The Auctioneer as agent for the seller is not responsible for any default by the seller or the buyer. Auctioneer Bidding on behalf of Buyer 4. It is suggested that the interests of prospective buyers are best protected and served by the buyers attending at an auction. However, the Auctioneer will, if instructed, execute bids on behalf of a prospective buyer. Neither the Auctioneer nor its employees, servants or agents shall be responsible for any neglect or default in executing bids or failing to execute bids. Admission to Auctions 5. The Auctioneer shall have the right exercisable in its absolute discretion to refuse admission to its premises or attendance at its auctions by any person. Acceptance of Bids 6. The Auctioneer shall have the right exercisable in its absolute discretion to refuse any bids, advance the bidding in any manner it may decide, withdraw or divide any Lot, combine any two or more Lots and, in the case of a dispute, to put any Lot up for auction again. Indemnities 7. Any indemnity given under these conditions shall extend to all actions, proceedings, claims, demands, costs and expenses whatever and howsoever incurred or suffered by the person entitled to the benefit of the indemnity and the Auctioneer declares itself to be a trustee of the benefit of every such indemnity for its employees, servants or agents to the extent that such indemnity is expressed to be for their benefit. Representations in Catalogues 8. Representations or statements made by the Auctioneer in any Catalogue as to contribution, authorship, genuineness, source, origin, date, age, provenance, condition or estimated selling price or value is a statement of opinion only. Neither the Auctioneer nor its employees, servants or agents shall be responsible for the accuracy of any such opinions. Every person interested in a Lot must exercise and rely on their own judgment and opinion as to such matters. 9. The headings of the conditions herein contained are inserted for convenience of reference only and are not intended to be part of, or to effect, the meaning or interpretation thereof. Governing Law 10. These conditions shall be governed by and construed in accordance with Irish Law. Notices 11. Any notice or other communication required to be given by the Auctioneer hereunder to a buyer or a seller shall, where required, be in writing and shall be sufficiently given if delivered by hand or sent by post to, in the case of the buyer, the address of the buyer specified in the Registration Form or Register, and in the case of the seller, the address of the seller specified in the Sale Order Form or to such other address as the buyer or seller (as appropriate) may notify the Auctioneer in writing. Every notice or communication given in accordance with this condition shall be deemed to have been received if delivered by hand on the day and time of delivery and if delivered by post three (3) business days after posting. General Terms and Conditions of Business The Auctioneer carries on business on the following terms and conditions and on such other terms or conditions as may be expressly agreed with the Auctioneer or set out in any relevant Catalogue. Conditions 12-21 relate mainly to buyers and conditions 22-32 relate mainly to sellers. Words and phrases with special meanings are defined in condition 1. Buyers and sellers are requested to read carefully the Cataloguing Practice and Catalogue Explanation contained in condition 2.
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 135 The Buyer 12. The buyer shall be the highest bidder acceptable to the Auctioneer who buys at the Hammer Price. Any dispute which may arise with regard to bidding or the acceptance of bids shall be settled by the Auctioneer. Every bidder shall be deemed to act as principal unless the Auctioneer has prior to the auction, acknowledged in writing that a bidder is acting as agent on behalf of a named principal. Commission 13. The buyer shall pay the Auctioneer a commission at the rate of 20%, exclusive of V.A.T.. Payment 14. Unless credit terms have been agreed with the Auctioneer before the auction the buyer of a Lot shall pay to the Auctioneer within one (1) day from the date of the auction the Total Amount Due. Notwithstanding this, the Auctioneer may, in its sole discretion, require a buyer to pay a deposit of 25% of the Total Amount Due at the conclusion of the auction. The Auctioneer may apply any payments received by a buyer towards any sums owing from that buyer to the Auctioneer on any account whatever regardless of any directions of the buyer or his agent in that regard whether express or implied. The Auctioneer shall only accept payment from successful bidders in cash or by the bidder’s own cheque. Cheques drawn by third parties, whether in the Auctioneer’s favour or requiring endorsement, shall not be accepted. Reservation of Title buyer until he has paid to the Auctioneer the Total Amount Due. 15. Notwithstanding delivery or passing of risk to the buyer the ownership of a Lot shall not pass to the buyer until he has paid to the Auctioneer the Total Amount Due. Collection of Purchases 16. The buyer shall at his own expense collect the Lot purchased not later than seven (7) days after the date of the auction but (unless credit terms have been agreed with the Auctioneer pursuant to condition 14) not before payment to the Auctioneer of the Total Amount Due. The buyer shall be responsible for any removal, storage and insurance charges in respect of any Lot which is not taken away within seven (7) days after the date of the auction. The purchased Lot shall be at the buyer’s risk in all respects from the earlier of the time of collection or the expiry of one (1) day from the date of the auction. Neither the Auctioneer nor its employees, servants or agents shall thereafter be liable for any loss or damage of any kind howsoever caused while a purchased Lot remains in its custody or control after such time. Packaging and Handling of Purchased Lots 17. Purchased Lots may be packed and handled by the Auctioneer, its employees, servants or agents. Where this is done it is undertaken solely as a courtesy to buyers and at the discretion of the Auctioneer. Under no circumstances shall the Auctioneer, its employees, servants or agents be liable for damage of any kind and howsoever caused to glass or frames nor shall the Auctioneer be liable for the errors or omissions of, or for any damage caused by, any packers or shippers which the Auctioneer has recommended. Non-Payment or Failure to Collect Purchased Lots 18. If a buyer fails to pay for and/or collect any purchased Lot by the dates herein specified for payment and collection the Auctioneer shall, in its absolute discretion and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies it may have, be entitled to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies without further notice to the buyer: (a) To issue court proceedings for damages for breach of contract; (b) To rescind the sale of that Lot or any other Lots sold to the buyer whether at that or at any other auction; (c) To resell the Lot or cause it to be resold whether by public auction or private sale. In the event that there is a deficien- cy between the Total Amount Due by the buyer and the amount received by the Auctioneer on such resale after deduction of any necessary expenses the difference shall be paid to the Auctioneer by the buyer. Any surplus arising shall belong to the seller. (d) To store (whether at the Auctioneer’s premises or elsewhere) and insure the purchased Lot at the expense of the buyer. (e) To charge interest on the Total Amount Due at the rate of 2% over and above the base rate from time to time of Bank of Ireland or if there be no such rate, the nearest equivalent thereto as determined by the Auctioneer in its absolute discretion from the date on which payment is due hereunder to the date of actual payment. (f) To retain that Lot or any other Lot purchased by the buyer whether at the same or any other auction and release same to the buyer only after payment to the Auctioneer of the Total Amount Due. (g) To apply any sums which the Auctioneer received in respect of Lots being sold by the buyer towards settlement of the Total Amount Due. (h) To exercise a lien on any property of the buyer in the possession of the Auctioneer or whatever reason. Liability of Auctioneer and Seller 19. Prior to auction ample opportunity is given for the inspection of the Lots on sale and each buyer by making a bid acknowledges that he has, by exercising and relying on his own judgment, satisfied himself as to the physical condition, age and Catalogue description of each Lot (including but not restricted to whether the Lot is damaged or has been repaired or restored). All Lots are sold with all faults and imperfections and errors of description. None of the seller, the Auctioneer nor any of their employees, servants or agents shall be responsible for any error of description or for the condition or authenticity of any Lot. No warranty whatsoever is given by the seller or Auctioneer or by any of their employees, servants or agents in respect of any Lot and any condition or warranty express or implied by statute or otherwise is hereby specifically excluded. Forgeries 20. Any amount paid by a buyer in respect of a Lot which, if it is proved within three (3) years of the date of the auction at which it was purchased, to have been a Forgery shall be refunded to the seller subject to the provisions hereof, provided that: (a) The Lot has been returned by the buyer to the Auctioneer within three (3) years of the date of the auction in the same condition in which it was at the time of the auction together with evidence proving that it is a Forgery, the number of the Lot and the date of the auction at which it was purchased; (b) The Auctioneer is satisfied that the Lot is a Forgery and that the buyer has and is able to transfer good and market- able title to the Lot free from any third party claims; FURTHER PROVIDED THAT the buyer shall have no rights hereunder if: (i) The description of the Lot in the Catalogue at the time of the auction was in accordance with the then generally accepted opinion of scholars or experts or fairly indicated that there was a conflict of such opinion; (ii) The only method of establishing at the time of the auction in question that the Lot was a Forgery would have been by means of scientific processes which were not generally accepted for use until after the date of the auction or which were unreasonably expensive or impractical. The buyer’s sole entitlement under this condition is to a refund of the actual amount paid by him in respect of the Lot. Under no circumstances shall the Auctioneer be liable for any damage, loss (including consequential, indirect or economic loss) or expense suffered or incurred by the buyer by reason of the Lot being a Forgery. The benefit of this condition shall be solely and exclusively for the buyer and shall not be assignable. The buyer shall for the purpose of this condition be the person to whom the original invoice in respect of the sale of the Lot is made. Photographs 21. The buyer authorises the Auctioneer at any time to make use of any photographs or illustrations of the Lot purchased by the buyer for such purposes as the Auctioneer may require. CONDITIONS WHICH MAINLY CONCERN THE SELLER Auctioneer’s Discretion 22. With regard to the sale of any Lot the Auctioneer shall have the following powers exercisable solely in the discretion of the Auctioneer: (i) To decide whether to offer any Lot for sale or not; (ii) To decide whether a particular Lot is suitable for sale by the Auctioneer and, if so, to determine which auction, the place and date of sale, the conditions of sale and the manner in which such sale should be conducted; (iii) To determine the description of any Lot in a Catalogue. (iv) To decide whether the views of any expert shall be obtained and to submit Lots for examination by any such experts. (v) To determine what illustration of a Lot (if any) is to be included in the Catalogue. Seller’s Warranty and Indemnity 23. The seller warrants to the Auctioneer and to the buyer that he is the true owner of the Lot or is legally authorised to sell the Lot on behalf of the true owner and can transfer good and marketable title to the Lot free from any third party claims. As regards Lots not held by the Auctioneer on its premises or under its control the seller warrants and undertakes to the Auctioneer and the buyer that the Lot will be available and in a deliverable state on demand by the Auctioneer or buyer. The seller shall indemnify the Auctioneer and the buyer or any of their respective employees, servants or agents against any loss or damage suffered by any of them in consequence of any breach of the above warranties or undertakings by the seller.
  • 136 Reserves 24. Subject to the Auctioneer’s discretion, the seller shall be entitled prior to the auction to place a reserve on any Lot. All reserves must be agreed in advance by the Auctioneer and entered on the Sale Order Form or subsequently be confirmed in writing to the Auctioneer prior to auction. This also applies to changes in reserves. A reserve may not be placed upon any Lots under €500 in value. The reserve shall be the minimum Hammer Price at which the Lot may be sold by the Auctioneer. A reserve once in place may only be changed with the consent of the Auctioneer. A commission shall be charged on the ‘knock-down’ bid for Lots which fail to reach the reserve price. Such commission shall be 5% of the ‘knock-down’ bid. This commission and any VAT payable thereon must be paid before removal of the Lot after the auction. The minimum commission hereunder shall be €50. The Auctioneer may in its sole discretion sell a Lot at a Hammer Price below the reserve therefore but in such case the Proceeds of Sale to which the seller shall be entitled shall be the same as they would have been had the sale been at the reverse. Unless a reserve has been placed on a Lot in accordance with the provisions set out above such Lot shall be put up for sale without reserve. In the event that any reserve price is not reached at auction then for so long as the Lot remains with the Auctioneer and to the extent that the Lot has not been re-entered in another auction pursuant to condition 31 the seller authorises the Auctioneer to sell the Lot by private treaty at not less than the reserve price. The Auctioneer shall ensure that in such a case those conditions herein which concern mainly the buyer shall, with any necessary modification, apply to such sale. Commission 25. The seller shall pay the Auctioneer commission at the rate of 10% on the Hammer Price of all Lots sold on behalf of the seller at Irish Art Sales and 17.5% on the Hammer Price of all Lots sold on behalf of the seller at Fine Art, Wine and Militaria Sales together with V.A.T. thereon at the applicable rate. The seller authorises the Auctioneer to deduct from the Hammer Price paid by the buyer the Auctioneer’s Commission under this condition; VAT payable at the applicable rates and any other amounts due by the seller to the Auctioneer in whatever capacity howsoever arising. The seller agrees that the Auctioneer may also receive commission from the buyer pursuant to condition 13. Insurance 26. Unless otherwise instructed by the seller, all Lots (with the exception of motor vehicles) deposited with the Auctioneer or put under its control for sale shall automatically be insured by the Auctioneer under the Auctioneer’s own fine arts policy for such sum as the Auctioneer shall from time to time in its absolute discretion determine. The seller shall pay the Auctioneer a contribution towards such insurance at the rate of 1.5% of the Hammer Price plus VAT. If the seller instructs the Auctioneer not to insure a Lot then the Lot shall at all times remain at the risk of the seller who undertakes to indemnify the Auctioneer and hold the Auctioneer harmless against any and all claims made or proceedings brought against the Auctioneer of whatever nature and howsoever and wheresoever occurring for loss or damage to the Lot. The sum for which a Lot is covered for insurance under this condition shall not constitute and shall not be relied upon by the seller as a representation, warranty or guarantee as to the value of the Lot or that the Lot will, if sold by the Auctioneer, be sold for such amount. Such insurance shall subsist until such time as the Lot is paid for and collected by the buyer or, in the case of Lots sold which are not paid for or collected by the buyer by the due date hereunder for payment or collection such due date or, in the case of Lots which are not sold, on the expiry of seven (7) days from the date on which the Auctioneer has notified the seller to collect the Lots. Recision of Sale 27. If before the Auctioneer has paid the Proceeds of Sale to the seller the buyer proves to the satisfaction of the Auctioneer that the Lot sold is a Forgery and the requirements of condition 20 are satisfied the Auctioneer shall rescind the sale and refund to the buyer any amount paid to the Auctioneer by the buyer in respect of the Lot. Payment of Proceeds of Sale 28. The Auctioneer shall remit the Proceeds of Sale to the seller not later than thirty (30) days after the date of the auction, provided however that, if by that date, the Auctioneer has not received the Total Amount Due from the buyer then the Auctioneer shall remit the Proceeds of Sale within seven (7) working days after the date on which the Total Amount Due is received from the buyer. If credit terms have been agreed between the Auctioneer and the buyer the Auctioneer shall remit to the seller the Proceeds of Sale not later than thirty (30) days after the date of the auction unless otherwise agreed by the seller. If before the Total Amount Due is paid by the buyer the Auctioneer pays the seller an amount equal to the Proceeds of Sale then title to the Lot shall pass to the Auctioneer. If the buyer fails to pay the Auctioneer the Total Amount Due within fourteen (14) days after the date of the auction, the Auctioneer shall endeavour to notify the seller and take the seller’s instructions on the course of action to be taken and, to the extent that it is in the sole opinion of the Auctioneer feasible, shall endeavour to assist the seller to recover the Total Amount Due from the buyer provided that nothing herein shall oblige the Auctioneer to issue proceedings against the buyer in the Auctioneer’s own name. If circumstances do not permit the Auctioneer to take instructions from the seller or, if after notifying the seller, it does not receive instructions within seven (7) days, the Auctioneer reserves the right, and is hereby authorised by the seller at the seller’s expense, to agree special terms for payments of the Total Amount Due, to remove, store and insure the Lot sold, to settle claims made by or against the buyer on such terms as the Auctioneer shall in its absolute discretion think fit, to take such steps as are necessary to collect monies due by the buyer to the seller and, if necessary, to rescind the sale and refund money to the buyer. Payment of Proceeds to Overseas Sellers 29. If the seller resides outside Ireland the Proceeds of Sale shall be paid to such seller in Euro unless it was agreed with the seller prior to the auction that the Proceeds of Sale would be paid in a currency (other than Euro) specified by the seller in which case the Proceeds of Sale shall be paid by the Auctioneer to the seller in such specified currency (provided that that currency is legally available to the Auctioneer in the amount required) calculated at the rate of exchange quoted to the Auctioneer by its bankers on the date of payment. Charges for Withdrawn Lots 30. Once catalogued, Lots withdrawn from sale before proofing/publication of Catalogue will be subject to commission of 5% of the Auctioneer’s latest estimate of the auction price of the Lot withdrawn together with VAT thereon and any expenses incurred by the Auctioneer in relation to the Lot. If Lots are withdrawn after proofing or publication of Catalogue they will be subject to a commission of 10% of the Auctioneer’s latest estimate of the auction price of the Lot withdrawn together with VAT thereon and any expenses incurred by the Auctioneer in relation to the Lot. All commission hereunder must be paid for before Lots withdrawn may be removed. Unsold Lots 31. Where any Lot fails to sell at auction the Auctioneer shall notify the seller accordingly and (in the absence of agreement between the seller and the Auctioneer to the contrary) such Lot may, in the absolute discretion of the Auctioneer, be re-entered in the next suitable auction unless instructions are received from the seller to the contrary, otherwise such Lots must be collected at the seller’s expense within the period of thirty (30) days of such notification from the Auctioneer. Upon the expiry of such period the Auctioneer shall have the right to sell such Lots by public auction or private sale and on such terms as the Auctioneer in its sole discretion may think fit. The Auctioneer shall be entitled to deduct from the price received for such Lots any sums owing to the Auctioneer in respect of such Lots including without limitation removal, storage and insurance expenses, any commission and expenses due in respect of the prior auction and commission and expenses in respect of the subsequent auction together with all reasonable expenses before remitting the balance to the seller. If the seller cannot be traced the balance shall be placed in a bank account in the name of the Auctioneer for the seller. Any deficit arising shall be due from the seller to the Auctioneer. Any Lots returned at the seller’s request shall be returned at the seller’s risk and expense and will not be insured in transit unless the Auctioneer is so instructed by the seller. Auctioneer’s Right to Photographs and Illustrations 32. The seller authorises the Auctioneer to photograph and illustrate any Lot placed with if for sale and further authorises the Auctioneer to use such photographs and illustrations and any photographs and illustrations provided by the seller at any time in its absolute discretion (whether or not in connection with the auction).
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 137 Detail of lot 93
  • 138 800 Years IRISH POLITICAL, LITERARY & MILTARY HISTORY Irish Political, Literary & Military History Auction 15th April 2014 Including a broad range of political, literary and military history, this annual sale is the largest sale of its kind and attracts collectors from all over Ireland and further afield. This important auction will continue to be the best place to sell rare and unique items of Irish interest. To enquire about including items please contact Kieran O’Boyle at +353 1 6760261
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 139 Est1887 Fine Jewellery & Watches Auction Tuesday20th Mayat6pm A diamond single-stone ring, Hammer Price: €15,000 Dec 2013 Enquiries to Karen Regan - 01 6760261 - karen.regan@adams.ie NOw Consigning
  • 140 Highlights viewing in Belfast 8th - 13th May The Ava Gallery, Clandeboye Full Sale viewing in Dublin 25th - 28th May, Adam’s, 26 St. Stephen’s Green IMPORTANT IRISH ART Auction Wednesday 28th May 2014 26 St. Stephen’s Green • Dublin 2 • Tel +353 1 6760261 • Fax +353 1 6624725 • info@adams.ie • www.adams.ie
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 141
  • 142 A Armstrong, Arthur 3 B Barton, Rose 96 Behan, John 45 Brady, Charles 6 Byrne, Desmond A. 50 C Campbell, George 69 Caracciolo, Niccolo 122-124 Coleman, Simon 82 & 83 Colles Watkins, B. 116 Craig, James Humbert 77 Cullen, Tom 131 Curling, Peter 1 D Dickie, Doreen 23 Dillon, Gerard 37-40 E English, James 26, 127 F Flanagan, T.P. 2 French, William Percy 97-100 G Garner, Phillipa (Bayliss) 117 Geoghegan, Trevor 70 H Hamilton, Eva Henrietta 111 Hamilton, Hugh Douglas 113 Hamilton, Letitia Marion 8 Hanlon, Father Jack P. 14, 15 Hayes, Edwin 95 Hayes, Ernest 89 Hennessy, Patrick 27-29 Henry, Paul 74 Hone, David 86 Hone, Evie 17-21 Hoye, Phillip 87 I Iten, Hans 128 J Jellett, Mainie 21A K Kelly, Frances 71 Kelly, Oisín 44 Kingston, Richard 129 L Lamb, Charles 115 Le Brocquy, Louis 56-64 Le Jeune, James 126 Leech, William John 33-34 Leonard, Patrick 118 M MacGonigal, Maurice 35-36 Malton, James 92 Mason, William 114 McCaig, Norman J. 76 McGuinness, Norah 9-12, 13 McGuire, Edward 88 McWilliam, F.E. 42-43 Middleton, Colin 4, 5, 65-68 Montgomery O’Rorke, E. 21B Moutray Kyle, Georgina 7 N Nicol, Erskine 108 Nisbet, Tom 130 O O’Connor, James Arthur (Style of) 106 O’Connor, James Arthur 107 O’Malley, Tony 55 O’Neill, Daniel 41 O’Neill, Mark 91 O’Ryan, Fergus 78-81 O’Sullivan, Seán 119 P Pomeroy, Krystyna 46-47 R Rákóczi, Basil Ivan 16 Reeves, Percy Oswald 24 Reid, Nano 22 Renard-Goulet, Yann 49 Robertson-Craig, Henry 30-32 Rode, Mark 48 Russell, George 72 & 73 Ryan, Thomas 84-85, 125 S Sadler II, William 109 -110 Scott, William 54 Scully, Sean 53 Solomons, Estella Frances 75, 112 Stopford, Robert Lowe 93 Stopford, William Henry 94 T Tansey, Francis 51-52 V Verling, Walter 90 W Walton, Conor 25 Webb, Kenneth 120 & 121 Y Yeats, Jack Butler 101 - 105 INDEX
  • Important Irish Art, wednesday 26th March 2014 at 6pm 143
  • 144 Est1887