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Bananas make good plates - teacher's notes (by ActionAid)
 

Bananas make good plates - teacher's notes (by ActionAid)

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This KS2 (ages 7–11) teaching resource, part of ActionAid’s ‘Bin world hunger, not your food’ campaign helps pupils to think about what happens to the food we don’t eat and to campaign ...

This KS2 (ages 7–11) teaching resource, part of ActionAid’s ‘Bin world hunger, not your food’ campaign helps pupils to think about what happens to the food we don’t eat and to campaign against food waste in their schools.

The resource begins by exploring how much of our food goes to waste globally and nationally (in the UK) before showing how the Adivasi people of Chembakolli use their food crops for more than just nourishment, helping them to live a more sustainable lifestyle. The resource ends by getting pupils to design posters asking their school community to stop wasting food.

Suggested for KS2 (ages 7-11) Geography.

Also available to download: PowerPoint, lesson plan, editable templates, PDF templates

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    Bananas make good plates - teacher's notes (by ActionAid) Bananas make good plates - teacher's notes (by ActionAid) Document Transcript

    • ActionAid schools | June 2013 |1Photo credit:LizNewbon/ActionAidBananas make good platesTeacher’s notes
    • ActionAid schools | June 2013 |2Slide 1/ Bananas make good plates - Food sustainability in Chembakolli, June 2013Objectives:To understand that food waste is a global problemTo understand what food sustainability isOutcome:To create a poster or newspaper front pageCurriculum links:KS2 Citizenship2 a. to research, discuss and debate topical issues, problems and eventsKS2 Geography5b. recognise how and why people may seek to manage environments sustainably, and toidentify opportunities for their own involvement [for example, taking part in a local conservationproject].KS2 English – En3 writing9b. to inform and explain, focusing on the subject matter and how to convey it in sufficient detailfor the reader9c. to persuade, focusing on how arguments and evidence are built up and language used toconvince the readerPhoto Credit: Liz Newbon/ActionAidSlide 2/How much food do we throw away each year?Activity: Food waste voteAsk learners to vote on how much food they think is thrown away globally each year.Answerb) 50% (half) of all food producedEvery year, around the world, we throw away up to 50% (half) of all the food produced meaningit goes into the bin rather than into our stomachs. (Source:http://www.imeche.org/knowledge/themes/environment/global-food).Slide 3/ How much food do we throw away each year?Activity: Food waste voteAsk learners to vote on where they think most of the food waste happens in the UK.Answerc) homes.Across the UK, we throw away around 15 million tonnes of food a year, the weight equivalent toone million London double decker buses. Half of that food is thrown away at home. (Source:http://england.lovefoodhatewaste.com/node/2163).
    • ActionAid schools | June 2013 |3Slide 4/Think – Pair – ShareActivity: Why do we throw away so much food in the UK? discussionAsk learners if they know why so much food is thrown away in the UK.1. Think: ask learners to think about the question on their own for about a minute.2. Pair: give learners a couple of minutes to compare their answers.3. Share: spend a few minutes sharing some of the learners‟ answers. How do they compareto the top four reasons?The top four reasons for throwing away food in the UK are:- Poor food storage, e.g. not putting bread in breadbin or fruit and veg in the fridge- Over-strict sell-by dates which lead to people throwing away food long before it is unfit forhuman consumption- Supermarkets encouraging shoppers to buy more food than they need with „buy-one-get-one-free‟ offers- We are also very fussy about the way our food looks which means supermarkets throw awayaround a third of the fruit and vegetables they buy because they don‟t look right!Slide 5/It doesn’t matter – we can grow more food!Growing crops and animals for food uses up a lot of land, water and energy, all of which arelimited resources. For example, to grow 1kg of bananas uses the same amount of water as 10baths* while 1kg of chocolate uses the same amount of water for 215 baths*!(Source:http://www.imeche.org/docs/default-source/reports/Global_Food_Report.pdf?sfvrsn=0).*a bath uses an average of 80 litres of water(source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/homes/housekeeping/wastenot_index.shtml)Photo Credit: Liz Newbon/ActionAidSlide 6/It doesn’t matter – food rots down to make compost!When we throw away food, it ends up in a landfill site. The lack of air and light in landfill meansthat, rather than rotting down to make compost which can be used to feed more crops, the foodbreaks down to produce methane. Methane is a greenhouse gas so every time food goes intolandfill, it contributes to climate change!Rather than putting more pressure on the environment, we could live try to live more sustainablyby following the example of the Adivasi people of Chembakolli.Photo Credit: Liz Newbon/ActionAid
    • ActionAid schools | June 2013 |4Slide 7/Think – Pair – ShareActivity: What do different foods have in common? discussionAsk learners if they know what bananas, coffee, coconuts and jackfruit* have in common.1. Think: ask learners to think about the question on their own for about a minute.2. Pair: give learners a couple of minutes to compare their answers.3. Share: spend a few minutes sharing some of the learners‟ answers.Learners are likely to focus on food and drink. Explain that they are also all grown in India andthat they are grown and used sustainably by the Adivasi people of Chembakolli.*Jackfruit are very large fruit which can be eaten raw as well as used in cooking sweet andsavoury dishes. Jackfruit taste like a combination of apple, banana and pineapple.Slide 8/What can we use these for?Activity: What can we use these for? discussionAsk learners how else the villagers of Chembakolli might use bananas, jackfruit, coffee andcoconuts other than to eat and drink.The following slides seven slides give examples of other uses for the four foodstuffs.Photo Credit: Liz Newbon/ActionAidSlide 9/Bananas make good… platesBanana leaves are large, flexible, and waterproof and can be used as “plates” in some parts ofthe world, including India. In Tamil Nadu, the state in India where Chembakolli is found, bananaleaves are dried and then used as packing materials and for making cups to hold liquid foods.Photo Credit: Liz Newbon/ActionAidSlide 10/Jackfruit make good… spoonsJackfruit grow very big and look a bit like cooking pots hanging from the branches of the tree.Jackfruit is eaten raw and is used in sweet and savoury dishes. As well as eating the fruit,people use the leaves of the tree as spoons and the wood for furniture, doors and their houses.Photo Credit: Liz Newbon/ActionAidSlide 11/Jackfruit make good… birdtrapsTraditionally, the Adivasi would trap birds to eat as they are a good source of protein. A birdtrap (Velanjikol) is made from twigs coated in sesame oil and sap from trees such as theJackfruit tree. The oil and sap creates a sticky substance which the birds get stuck to.Photo Credit: Jacqui Dearden/ActionAid
    • ActionAid schools | June 2013 |5Slide 12/Coffee makes good… dancing sticksThe Mullakurumba tribe use sticks called Kolkundu to beat the rhythm of music. The sticks aremade from local trees like the coffee tree.You can watch an example of the dance on YouTube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4y6h2-KJss.You can find instructions on how to dance with Kolkundu on the Chembakolli blog:http://www.chembakolli.com/blog/?p=2295Photo Credit: Jacqui Dearden/ActionAidSlide 13/Coffee makes good… dancing sticksThe Mullakurumba tribe use sticks called Kolkundu to beat the rhythm of music. The sticks aremade from local trees like the coffee tree.You can watch an example of the dance on YouTube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4y6h2-KJss.You can find instructions on how to dance with Kolkundu on the Chembakolli blog:http://www.chembakolli.com/blog/?p=2295Photo Credit: Jacqui Dearden/ActionAidSlide 14/Coconuts make good… ladlesTamil Nadu, the Indian state where Chembakolli is found, produces a quarter of India‟scoconuts. The whole coconut plant is used from the leaves (to make brooms) to the roots (tomake dyes). The shells have multiple uses. The Adivasi people turn them into ladles which theycall kayils.Photo Credit: Jacqui Dearden/ActionAidSlide 15/Coconuts make good… ladlesTamil Nadu, the Indian state where Chembakolli is found, produces a quarter of India‟scoconuts. The whole coconut plant is used from the leaves (to make brooms) to the roots (tomake dyes). The shells have multiple uses. The Adivasi people turn them into ladles which theycall kayils.Photo Credit: Jacqui Dearden/ActionAidSlide 16/Why should we eat sustainably?Activity: design a poster or newspaper front pageLearners should produce a poster or newspaper frontpage (templates provided) to explain totheir school community why we need to be like the villagers in Chembakolli and think moreabout making the best of our food crops.The finished posters and/or newspapers can be displayed around the classroom or school aspart of a campaign on food waste or as an introduction to teaching from our „Just Eat It‟ schoolspack, part of our „Bin World Hunger. Not your food‟ teaching resources.Photo Credit: Liz Newbon/ActionAid
    • ActionAid schools | June 2013 |6Slide 17/Coconuts make good… ladlesWhat you can do next:- If you enjoyed using this resource, please share it with a colleague.- If you would like to teach more about food sustainability, you can sign up for our „Just Eat It‟pack for primary schools, due to be published in July 2013.- If you would like to teach more about life in an Indian village, you can buy a Chembakolliartefacts pack from our schools shop (http://schools.actionaid.org.uk/chembakolli-artefacts--role-play-pack-111-p.asp).Photo Credit: Liz Newbon/ActionAid