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What should hospitals think about when medical transcription outsourcing 10 Answers! - Uncut Bonus Edition P  R  E  S  E  ...
We read the question:  What should hospitals think about when medical transcription outsourcing, and how can they ensure t...
® What should hospitals think about when medical transcription outsourcing? Crystal Hoisington wrote: President, SkyparkOS...
Andy Braverman wrote: President & CTO at Apptec Corporation EMR/EHR in principal is a great idea. While the purchase of th...
Jagan Mohan Muthu wrote: Business Development Executive at TDHS The reason that it would cut down the transcription jobs i...
Dr. V.V. Pratap Reddy wrote: CEO at Srija Solutions Private Limited  I have seen my clients move in and out of speech reco...
Cathy Leahy wrote: Service Owner at Datamed Medical Transcription If a doctor loses just one minute of productive time, he...
Farkhruddin Kamdar wrote: Managing Partner at K-SCRIBES INDIA  The simple logic is, an average human brain thinks faster t...
Ranjan Rawat  wrote: Operations at Acroseas Consultancy Pvt. Ltd. There is a lot of anxiety within the Medical Transcripti...
Stay connected to us on the following platforms: @Acroseas  on Twitter  Acroseas  on Facebook Fan Page  acroseasmedicalser...
- The End -   Brought to you by  ACROSEAS LinkedIn ®  is a trademark of LinkedIn Corporation Mountain View, CA USA ©2008. ...
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What Should Hospitals Think About When Medical Transcription Outsourcing and How Can They Ensure The Security Of The Information? - Linked Healthcare

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What Should Hospitals Think About When Medical Transcription Outsourcing and How Can They Ensure The Security Of The Information?

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Transcript of "What Should Hospitals Think About When Medical Transcription Outsourcing and How Can They Ensure The Security Of The Information? - Linked Healthcare"

  1. 1. What should hospitals think about when medical transcription outsourcing 10 Answers! - Uncut Bonus Edition P R E S E N T S and How can they ensure the security of the information?
  2. 2. We read the question: What should hospitals think about when medical transcription outsourcing, and how can they ensure the security of the information? Many think that “medical transcription outsourcing" is a difficult decision to make for hospitals. Many others think that " medical transcription outsourcing " can be a major driver of cutting costs for hospitals . We stumbled upon conversations of healthcare professionals who spoke about the reason to outsource transcription to another country and the security measures required for the same.... What is your take? LinkedIn ® is a trademark of LinkedIn Corporation Mountain View, CA USA ©2008. Linked Healthcare is a group on LinkedIn. No other affiliation exists. These quotations do not necessarily reflect the opinion of anyone other than the person quoted. Quotations may be attributed incorrectly. This is an unedited edition of “Let the People Speak.” ™ All quotations have been previously made available to the general public. This free resource may be re-quoted with the following attribution: Found at comments on LinkedIn ®
  3. 3. ® What should hospitals think about when medical transcription outsourcing? Crystal Hoisington wrote: President, SkyparkOS, Inc. When considering the use of off-shore transcription services, you must determine the needs of your hospital. If your transcription needs are ONLY for cost savings, then an off-shore service is your best answer, they are certainly the cheapest service around. However, if your transcription needs are for the accurate transcription of patient records that will communicate your facility’s quality of care and ensure the best protection from potential litigation, a quick read of the responses above makes it clear that an off-shore service is not the best answer. The transcriptionists and QA personnel employed by off-shore services DO NOT understand the English language; not the grammar, syntax, punctuation, etc., to represent a quality hospital, clinic, or physician. http://bit.ly/ acroseas
  4. 4. Andy Braverman wrote: President & CTO at Apptec Corporation EMR/EHR in principal is a great idea. While the purchase of the EMR/EHR software will be initially expensive for the hospital, as long as they implement it right, it should over the long run help improve a person's healthcare continuity. The way to do it right, is for the doctor to dictate just as they have for decades. Dictation is the most efficient use of the doctor's time. The EMR/EHR should only be in front of the doctor to review a patient's records... not to input data into it. For data input into the EMR/EHR, that should be a "back office" task performed by the transcriptionist. All that changes is that instead of typing into Word (or what ever word processor you prefer), the transcriptionist will be typing into the EMR/EHR to click here, and type there. Everybody gets to keep their job... including the hospital administrator who won't get fired for having their doctors type at $200 an hour! Am I biased about the need to continue to use the "traditional" method of having the doctor's dictate... yes, but for good reason. Not because I continue, as I have for 20 years now, to develop and sell dictation and transcription products, but because I've seen 20 years of "we'll be going SR any day now", and 40 years of "think metric!". I can give you dozens more examples of things that sounded great, but once shown the "light of day", their great promise quickly fades away.
  5. 5. Jagan Mohan Muthu wrote: Business Development Executive at TDHS The reason that it would cut down the transcription jobs is the EMRs are developed in such a way that physicians can generate report in just a click away, though it is not the case in all the specialties. Robin Brewer wrote: Medical Transcriptionist at Preferred Transcription I do transcription for a large cancer hospital. I transcribe some very detailed reports for patients with all types of cancers. There is NO way a click of one button can generate all the individual information that is needed to be reported on each patient. NOT POSSIBLE! These are people's lives we are talking about here and all of their information needs to be documented in detail to make it possible to give them the best treatment that they deserve. http://bit.ly/ acroseas
  6. 6. Dr. V.V. Pratap Reddy wrote: CEO at Srija Solutions Private Limited I have seen my clients move in and out of speech recognition software and some gave a trial try of EMR and finally they groaned and grunted. Now the SRS clients are back because in the end they are doing and redoing a work which is neither their primary job nor compensates the quality time lost. Regarding EMR, the best option physicians felt after a trial run was having transcription integrated or get it copy pasted into the system than spent on exotic software and ending up in digital nightmare. My experience is the doctors are looking going electronic way but not in a route that cuts into their quality time and ends up in a 'treatment-is-worse-than-disease' situation. I think what I feel is that we are currently passing through is a fluid situation borne out of pulls and counter pulls of different lobbying groups , might take some time to whittle down. Sadly, the central players - 'Doctor & patient' - have become non entities in the sordid drama of powerful lobbies. Can anyone answer me conscientiously; Does anybody really interested in cost reduction of healthcare? If its is really cared, I would have gone for a open-sourced, inter operable national repository of EMR which can be accessed at a fraction of cost by doctors or other parties to the issue. Why, it was not done? That shows the true intentions. So, Honey, it’s all money over there at Capitol Hill. http://bit.ly/ acroseas
  7. 7. Cathy Leahy wrote: Service Owner at Datamed Medical Transcription If a doctor loses just one minute of productive time, he looses big money. The government incentives won't make up for the loss. Also, the former head of ONC says they will either be deferred or eliminated altogether. All this new fangled stuff is just some new toys for the kids to play with. The danger here is the transcriptionists are looking for other work and schools are eliminating the transcription programs. Donna Literell wrote: President & CEO, Elite Office Solutions In my own transcription business, I have seen two accounts try to move to EMRs. I asked them the same question, "Isn't your time more productively spent seeing patients than typing?" We have had both accounts try EMRs and then come back to us because the physicians hated it and as you said, they realized they were losing money. For one account, we are actually copying-and-pasting into their EMR (because their platform does not have very good tools for transcription), so it's almost double the work, but the doctors realized how insane it was for them to be wasting their time doing what we do. http://bit.ly/ acroseas
  8. 8. Farkhruddin Kamdar wrote: Managing Partner at K-SCRIBES INDIA The simple logic is, an average human brain thinks faster than a super computer, so if us humans have difficulty working out accents and sounds, how can we expect a computer to. The counter to this somebody told me was that now there are software's programmed to mimic the human brain in what ever function they are designed to perform (read Prey by Michael Crichton), but I still believe it will take any program ages to make identify the difference between native accents. (A sizeable percentage of physicians in the U.S. are non-natives). EMR/EHR as Andy said is already facing a lot of resistance as far as Doctors using them is concerned, so that is not a very real threat anyways. http://bit.ly/ acroseas
  9. 9. Ranjan Rawat wrote: Operations at Acroseas Consultancy Pvt. Ltd. There is a lot of anxiety within the Medical Transcription industry about the popularity of Speech Recognition and how its going to take away our business. There are scores of different accents, and it takes time even for a human transcriptionist to get accustomed to it. And to the untrained ear, the voice would make very little sense. That kind of Speech Recognition technology would take years to develop if at all it does. Lindsay Colorado wrote: Student at MTEC Not to mention but clicking boxes the physician's would be seeing patients as even less of an individual case-by-case basis and more of a group or subgroup. One can’t imagine the number of symptoms that would be missed because of the computer screen skipping steps based on the boxes checked. If this EMR is becoming part of the med student's program in school, they are probably trying to train doctors early on to be comfortable with this software? http://bit.ly/ acroseas
  10. 10. Stay connected to us on the following platforms: @Acroseas on Twitter Acroseas on Facebook Fan Page acroseasmedicalservices.wordpress.com on Corporate Blog www.acroseas.com on Website :- ®
  11. 11. - The End - Brought to you by ACROSEAS LinkedIn ® is a trademark of LinkedIn Corporation Mountain View, CA USA ©2008. Linkedin Healthcare is a group on LinkedIn. No other affiliation exists. These quotations do not necessarily reflect the opinion of anyone other than the person quoted. Quotations may be attributed incorrectly. All quotations have been previously made available to the general public. This free resource may be re-quoted with the following attribution: Comments on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/ acroseas ®
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