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Each individual project is a challenge in …

Each individual project is a challenge in
itself, but even more challenging is the requirement that organizations select a
portfolio of projects that contribute optimally to its strategic goals and manage that portfolio of projects in a manner that maximizes the use of resources.

More in: Business , Technology
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  • Project Management Test Drive Project Management Test Drive Copyright © 2000, 2001 Trustees of Boston University. All Rights Reserved. Participant Notes: This seminar provides an introduction to Project Management and the RG Freeman Group’s Project Management curriculum.   Instructor Notes:                1. Welcome – Done by Sponsor representative 2. Sponsor Notes a.     Information about sponsor’s organization b.     Sponsor’s points of contact – Sales Team c.     RG Freeman Group Education Affiliate 3. Information regarding presenter
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive 1995 Chaos Report $250 Billion spent on IT Projects Success rate – 16.2% Cost of cancelled projects - $81 Billion   2000 Chaos Report 28% Success rate Time overruns improved from 222% to 63% Cost overruns – from 189% to 45%
  • Project Management Test Drive 1995 Chaos Report $250 Billion spent on IT Projects Success rate – 16.2% Cost of cancelled projects - $81 Billion   2000 Chaos Report 28% Success rate Time overruns improved from 222% to 63% Cost overruns – from 189% to 45%
  • Project Management Test Drive Compare this against the information in the exercise. How many match? How does this information stack up against the experiences of the participants?   Take some time to discuss the quote from Jim Johnson. NS a self assessment in lite of the Standish findings
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive Project Management Test Drive Copyright © 2000, 2001 Trustees of Boston University. All Rights Reserved. Instructor Notes: Formally close out the session by re-visiting the session objectives captured in the beginning. Try to get their “acceptance” as delivered goods and place a check mark next to each one.   When finished, turn the audience back to the Sponsor’s representative to close out the session.   Remain in the room for questions/follow up activities after the session is over.
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive Most projects share three key attributes. 1. They are temporary in nature, having a clearly defined beginning and end. 2. They produce a unique deliverable or result that differentiates this project from all others. 3. They utilize finite resources in a structured environment.
  • Project Management Test Drive Portfolios represent a collection of unrelated projects, usually sharing a common resource pool, managed by the same person or organization. Portfolios differ from Programs . Portfolio projects are not integrated. While many of the resource management tools available to project managers apply to both portfolio and program management, the integration and scope management tools differ. Portfolio management tools tend to center on the prioritization and success of the individual project while program management tools are more focused on corporate benefit.
  • Project Management Test Drive While the term “Program” has specific meanings in different application areas, typically, a Program is a collection of related or integrated project which shows clear dependence, one upon the other. The whole is greater than the sum of the parts…Program Management is the centralized coordinated management of a program to achieve the program's strategic objectives and benefits.
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive Please note two key principles in the definition of a Project Manager. Project managers are people, individual and fallible. The science of project management as defined in best practices, and the art of project management, are attempts to address this fallibility. The term Project Objectives refers to two metrics; compliance with the key variables identified in the triple constraints, and the binary, measurable, success criteria of the project. These success criteria are often defined in the project scope statement.
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive Project Management Test Drive Copyright © 2000, 2001 Trustees of Boston University. All Rights Reserved. Instructor Notes: Formally close out the session by re-visiting the session objectives captured in the beginning. Try to get their “acceptance” as delivered goods and place a check mark next to each one.   When finished, turn the audience back to the Sponsor’s representative to close out the session.   Remain in the room for questions/follow up activities after the session is over.
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive The ANSI Standard for project management contains two key architectural underpinnings. One assumes that the work of the project is laid out in a logical fashion from start to finish; a project is initiated, project planning is undertaken, the project must then be executed and simultaneously controlled, and then the project must be formally closed. These five stages are referred to as the PMI Process Groups. As Process Groups, they are in fact, groups of project management related processes. These project management processes are drawn from nine skills sets, or PMI Knowledge Areas. In all, PMI defines 44 processes within the 9 knowledge areas.
  • Project Management Test Drive The numbers on the viewgraph above refer to the chapter numbers in the PMBOK.
  • Project Management Test Drive Project Management Test Drive Copyright © 2000, 2001 Trustees of Boston University. All Rights Reserved. Instructor Notes: Formally close out the session by re-visiting the session objectives captured in the beginning. Try to get their “acceptance” as delivered goods and place a check mark next to each one.   When finished, turn the audience back to the Sponsor’s representative to close out the session.   Remain in the room for questions/follow up activities after the session is over.
  • Project Management Test Drive .
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive Define the terms and how they naturally progress from the WBS deliverables. Reinforce the top-down approach of decomposing deliverables into the activities that produce them. HIERARCHY
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
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  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
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  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
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  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive Project Management Test Drive Copyright © 2000, 2001 Trustees of Boston University. All Rights Reserved. Instructor Notes: Formally close out the session by re-visiting the session objectives captured in the beginning. Try to get their “acceptance” as delivered goods and place a check mark next to each one.   When finished, turn the audience back to the Sponsor’s representative to close out the session.   Remain in the room for questions/follow up activities after the session is over.
  • Project Management Test Drive Talk to the “positive” side of risk, and that risk just really means uncertainty.
  • Project Management Test Drive Using one specific portion of WBS/Activity List (Food, Entertainment, Driving Directions, e.g.), ask the teams to identify 5 (or more) risks associated with it. Capture results on whiteboard/flipchart. Total time for exercise – 10 minutes. If rushed for time, this exercise can be run as a total group facilitated discussion where you act as the facilitator/recorder.   have the groups assess Probability/Impact using High/Medium/Low criteria. The goal here is to end up defining the top 3 risks for the project. Total time for exercise – 10 minutes. If rushed for time, this exercise can be run as a total group facilitated discussion where you act as the facilitator/recorder.
  • Project Management Test Drive Project Management Test Drive Copyright © 2000, 2001 Trustees of Boston University. All Rights Reserved. Instructor Notes: Formally close out the session by re-visiting the session objectives captured in the beginning. Try to get their “acceptance” as delivered goods and place a check mark next to each one.   When finished, turn the audience back to the Sponsor’s representative to close out the session.   Remain in the room for questions/follow up activities after the session is over.
  • Project Management Test Drive WHO DO WE TALK TO ? WHAT DO WE TELL THEM? WHEN TO WE TELL THEM? HOW DO WE TELL THEM? WILL THERE NEEDS CHANGE? WHAT DO WE EXPECT IN RETURN? 
  • Project Management Test Drive Pick 3 or 4 deliverables form previous exercises, and use stakeholders such as Project Team, Invited Guests, Neighbors, Hired Help, and fill in the grid.   DELIVERABLE RAM NOT REALLY COMM RAM Conduct the exercise as a facilitated discussion. Total time for exercise – 10 minutes. THIS IS THE LAST EXERCISE END OF TECHNICAL CONTENT ALL BASED ON THE PMI MODEL PMI ALSO HAVE A CONSENSUS CERTIFICATION…
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive Exploring Project Management Copyright © 2006 Start to Finish PM, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Portfolio management is performed to ensure that the projects within the organization’s project portfolio are strongly aligned with the goals of the organization. This should ensure that the goals of the organization are being advanced through the effective completion of project work. Projects are what we do as organizations in order to stay on top and compete effectively. At the same time, we cannot use project management as an excuse for not getting anything done. In contrast, project management should support the production of new products and services within an organization and should guide the efforts required to produce them. All decisions regarding project scope, schedule, budgets and quality should be weighed against the value of producing such products as determined by the organization’s strategic plan.
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive   FIRST GIVE OVERVIEW OF THE PMP INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED MORE AND MORE JOBS REQUIRE PMP MONSTER CAREER BUILDER FAST-TRACKERS HIGH PAY
  • Project Management Test Drive   FIRST GIVE OVERVIEW OF THE PMP INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED MORE AND MORE JOBS REQUIRE PMP MONSTER CAREER BUILDER FAST-TRACKERS HIGH PAY
  • Project Management Test Drive Instructor Notes: If connected to the Internet, bring up Monster.com and do the search suggested.
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive
  • Project Management Test Drive Instructor Notes: Sponsor introduces presenter. Sponsor will close out the meeting as well.

Transcript

  • 1. How to Bring Projects in On-Time & Under-Budget Presented by Lou Bergner
  • 2. Today’s Agenda
    • Why Project Management?
    • Excerpts from the ACEND Project Management curriculum
    • The advantages of Project Management proficiency
    • Summary
  • 3. Additional Participant Expectations
    • “ Project Management Test Drive” Tell me about______________”
  • 4. Today’s Agenda
    • Why Project Management?
    • Excerpts from the ACEND Project Management curriculum
    • The advantages of Project Management proficiency
    • Summary
  • 5. Why Is Today’s Organization Different
    • The end of hierarchy
    • Hyper-competition and the “Velocity of Technology” drive short-term focus and a chaotic environment
    • Let’s bet the organization on the project outcome
    • Let’s cut our resources to the bone
  • 6. Project Management on the front line
    • Increasing importance of projects in driving organizational change and strategic positioning
    • Need to reduce project costs and increase project success
    • Need to do MORE with LESS … FASTER
  • 7. The Importance of Project Management
    • And yet ….
    • Continued failure of projects to deliver
      • agreed upon SCOPE
      • on TIME
      • on BUDGET
  • 8. Exercise What are the top three factors that create a perception of success? Successful vs. Unsuccessful Projects What are the top three factors that cause a perception of failure?
  • 9. Successful v Unsuccessful The Statistics*
    • Standish Group’s Chaos Report
    • The Robbins-Gioia Survey
    • The Conference Board Survey
    • The KPMG Canada Survey
    • The OASIG Survey
    * www.it-cortex.com/stat_failure_rate.htm
  • 10. Successful v Unsuccessful The Statistics
    • Standish Chaos Report, 2003
      • 66% of major information technology (IT) projects failed!
      • Average cost overrun – 43%
      • 82% of projects experienced schedule overrun
      • Only 52% of required features and functions made it into the released systems
    Failed Project: >20% over budget >20% late Failing to meet >20% of the business requirements
  • 11. Standish Group Reports that …
    • Common obstacles to success
      • Unclear objectives
      • Lack of senior management support
      • Lack of effective project integration
      • Inadequate funding or change in business priorities
      • Original assumptions invalid
      • Ineffective team
      • Lack of communications
    “ When projects fail, it’s rarely technical.” - Jim Johnson, The Standish Group
  • 12. Deficiencies of Normal Project Management
    • Random activities
    • Paralysis
    • Establishment of unrealistic expectations
    • Unclear or incomplete deliverables, requirements or scope
    • Inability to identify successes & failures
    • Ineffective implementation
    • Lack of coordination
    • Staff burnout and frustration
    • Project failure
    • The blame game
  • 13. There Is Hope!
    • 94% of organizations that have embarked on a project management improvement initiative have reported positive results!
    • ACEND has a full suite of project management workshops designed to increase individual and organizational competency in project management.
  • 14. Today’s Agenda
    • Why Project Management?
    • Excerpts from the ACEND’s Project Management curriculum
    • The advantages of Project Management proficiency
    • Summary
  • 15. ACEND’s Project Management Curriculum
    • An opportunity to kick the tires
    • The project life cycle
    • Excerpts from the PM curriculum
  • 16. How are Classes Conducted?
    • Student Books
      • Theory content
      • Case study and exercises
    • Slide presentations
      • Theory and practical “Street” tools
    • Group Discussions
    • “ Hands On” exercises
    Adults learn By DOING Corporate Government
  • 17. Curriculum Excerpt: Concept and Practice of Project Mgmt. Unit-3
  • 18. Corporate Project Environment Corporate Strategy Tactical Implementation Tactical Implementation Tactical Implementation Program Portfolio Project Project Project Project WBS Project WBS Sub Project Sub Project Sub Project WBS Sub Project WBS Operations
  • 19. Project
    • A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result.
    Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, 4th Edition
  • 20. Portfolio
    • A portfolio is a collection of projects or programs and other work that are grouped together to facilitate effective management of that work to meet strategic business objectives.
    Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, 4th Edition
  • 21. Program
    • A program is a group of projects managed in a coordinated way to obtain benefits not available from managing them individually.
    Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, 4th Edition
  • 22. Operation
    • Operations are ongoing and produce repetitive products, services, or results.
    Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, 4th Edition
  • 23. Project Management and Project Manager Stakeholder Expectations SCOPE TIME COST KNOWLEDGE SKILLS TOOLS TECHNIQUES
  • 24. The Project Triple Constraints Cost Scope Time Project Deliverable Work Breakdown Structure Schedule Resources
  • 25. Curriculum Exert: Concepts and Practice of Project Mgmt. Unit-4
  • 26. Framework
    • PMI – Prince2 – CS/CSC - Others
    • The basic model of project management includes:
      • Project life cycles comprised of Project Phases
      • Project Phases comprised of groups of management tasks
      • Management Tasks in several different skill areas
  • 27. PMI Project Management Model
    • Two key architectural components
    • Process Groups – groups of logically related project management processes (activities)
        • There are 5 Process Groups
    • Skill Sets – project processes segregated by skill set
        • There are 9 Skill Sets called Knowledge Areas
        • There are 42 Processes (management tasks) within the 9 Knowledge Areas
  • 28. Process Groups Initiation Closure Planning Execution Monitoring and Control
  • 29. Knowledge Areas Project Integration Management Project Scope Management Project Time Management Project Cost Management Project Quality Management Project Human Resource Management Project Communication Management Project Risk Management Project Procurement management
  • 30. Curriculum Excerpts: Scope ( Unit-5 ) and Time Management ( Unit-7 and 8 )
  • 31. Sample Project
    • Use Project Management Tools & Techniques to:
      • Define the deliverables
      • Plan the project activities
      • Plan for issues and uncertainties
    Plan the “ World’s Best Superbowl Party”
  • 32. Decomposition Example Guests Entertainment Food Super Bowl Party Main TV Backup Antenna Kitchen TV Cable Service Invitations Responses Guest List Envelopes Beverages Snacks Hot Food Desserts
  • 33. Decomposition Example Food Super Bowl Party Beverages Snacks Hot Food Desserts Ice Cream Pie Whipped Cream Mints
  • 34. The First Variable … Scope Scope Project Deliverable
  • 35. Activity Lists
    • Schedule Activity
      • A discrete scheduled component of work performed during the course of a project. A schedule activity normally has an estimated duration, an estimated cost, and estimated resource requirements.
    • The Activity List:
      • Contains all activities that will be performed on the project
      • Concerns only those activities required as part of the project scope
  • 36. Decomposition Example - Activities VERBS NOUNS Food Super Bowl Party Beverages Snacks Hot Food Desserts Ice Cream Pie Whipped Cream Mints Decide on Flavors Travel to Grocery Purchase Ice Cream Store Ice Cream Implement Ice Cream
  • 37. Network Example Super Bowl Party
  • 38. Network Example Super Bowl Party
  • 39. Network Example Super Bowl Party 2.0 Food 1.0 The Game 3.0 Guests
  • 40. Network Example Super Bowl Party 2.0 Food 1.0 The Game 3.0 Guests 1.1 Cable Service 1.2 Big Screen TV 2.1 Food 2.2 Drinks 3.1 Friends 3.2 Neighbors
  • 41. Network Example Super Bowl Party 2.0 Food 1.0 The Game 3.0 Guests 1.1 Cable Service 1.2 Big Screen TV 2.1 Food 2.2 Drinks 3.1 Friends 3.2 Neighbors 1.2 Install Service 1.2 Test Service
  • 42. Network Example Super Bowl Party 2.0 Food 1.0 The Game 3.0 Guests 1.1 Cable Service 1.2 Big Screen TV 2.1 Food 2.2 Drinks 3.1 Friends 3.2 Neighbors 1.2 Install Service 1.2 Test Service
  • 43. Network Example Super Bowl Party 2.0 Food 1.0 The Game 3.0 Guests 1.1 Cable Service 1.2 Big Screen TV 2.1 Food 2.2 Drinks 3.1 Friends 3.2 Neighbors 1.2 Install Service 1.2 Test Service 1.2 Buy TV 1.2 Install TV 1.2 Decide on food 1.2 Buy food 1.2 Decide on drinks 1.2 Buy drinks 1.2 Invite friends 1.2 RSVP’s 1.2 Invite neighbors 1.2 RSVP’s 1.2 Hookup cable
  • 44. Network Example PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2
  • 45. Network Example S F PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 46. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 47. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 48. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 49. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 50. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 51. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 52. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 53. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 54. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 55. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 56. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 57. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 58. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 59. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 60. Network Example S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 PROJECT 1 DELIVERABLE 1.0 DELIVERABLE 2.0 DELIVERABLE 3.0 WP 1.1 WP 1.2 WP 2.1 WP 2.2 WP 3.1 WP 3.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 activity 3.2.2
  • 61. The Second Variable … Time Scope Time Project Deliverable
  • 62. The Link to “COST” $$$ or Work Time S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1
    • Activities involve WORK
    • Work requires RESOURCES
    • Resources cost MONEY
    • The cost of your resources on any activity define the activity’s cost
  • 63. Network Example $$$ or Work Time S F activity 1.2.2 activity 2.1.1 activity 2.1.2 activity 3.1.2 activity 3.2.1 WP 3.2.2 activity 1.1.1 activity 1.1.2 activity 1.2.1 activity 2.2.1 activity 2.2.2 activity 3.1.1
  • 64. The Third Variable … Cost Cost Scope Time Project Deliverable
  • 65. Variance Analysis 0 25 50 75 EV = actual work accomplished 12 6 Time Now Time Dollars 18 AC - what the work actually cost planned or scheduled work PV -
  • 66. Curriculum Exert: Risk Management. Unit-5
  • 67. Project Risk
    • An uncertain event or condition that, if it occurs, has a positive or negative effect on a project’s objectives.
  • 68. Exercise Identify four risks associated with producing the Super Bowl party Risk Identification & Analysis
  • 69. Curriculum Exert: Communications Management … Unit-6
  • 70. Communications Planning
    • Determining the information and communications needs of the project stakeholders: who they are, what is their level of interest and influence on the project, who needs what information, when they will need it, and how it will be given to them.
  • 71. Exercise
    • Identify three stakeholders for the superbowl party.
    • Fill out the grid using the identified stakeholders.
    Stakeholder Roles & Responsibilities
  • 72. Initial Stakeholder Analysis SCOPE – TIME - COST STAKEHOLDER INTERNAL EXTERNAL PRO CON INTEREST 1-2-3 INFLUENCE 1-2-3 ROLE ISSUE
  • 73. Today’s Agenda
    • Why Project Management?
    • Excerpts from the ACEND Project Management curriculum
    • The advantages of Project Management proficiency
    • Summary
  • 74. The Importance of Good Project Management in Tough Times
    • Helps effectively leverage sparse resources
    • Facilitates coordination of organizational efforts
    • Increases the probability of project success
    • Limits staff burnout
    • Serve more clients better and faster
    • Helps build and maintain a Competitive edge
  • 75. Goals of Project Management
    • All projects should support the overall strategy of the organization
    • All projects should be initiated for business reasons
    • Manage the value of project activities against strategic and tactical objectives
    • Prioritize schedule, cost, scope and quality
    • Proactively manage risks
  • 76. The Role of the Project Manager
    • Proactive problem solver
    • Negotiator
    • Conflict manager
    • Facilitator
    • Salesperson/marketer (for the project and its vision)
    • Supervisor and Planner
    • Definer of project requirements?
  • 77. Project Manager Skills
    • General management
    • Estimating and planning
    • Facilitation and the ability to “influence”
    • Resolving conflict and negotiating
    • Communicating effectively
    • Gathering and analyzing information
    • Leading and motivating teams
    • Making and facilitating decisions
  • 78. The Project Manager
    • Effective Project Managers don’t just “ HAPPEN ”
    • Effective Project Managers are “ TRAINED ”
    • An effective Project Manager uses both art and science to achieve successful results:
      • Art Creativity and flexibility to balance the requirements of scope, quality, time, and budget
      • Science Applying proven, repeatable tools, techniques, and processes to a project
  • 79. What to do next?
    • Grow your Project Management skill set
    • ACEND can help.
      • Curriculum
      • Instructors
      • Facilities
    • Consider Project Management Institute’s “Project Management Professional” certification.
      • Not just a credential
      • VERIFICATION OF A VALUE BASED SKILL SET
  • 80. Benefits of PMP® Certification
    • The PMP is an extremely valuable and marketable credential:
      • Independent valuable certification, demonstrating a standard of knowledge, experience, and education in project management - a core competency
      • Recognized and highly regarded throughout the world by employers and peers
  • 81. PMP® Value
    • Check classifieds for project managers
      • Note requirement for PMP®
    • Go to a career center website – i.e., Monster, CareerBuilder, etc.
      • Do a job search on “Project Manager PMP®”
  • 82. Project Management Professional (PMP)
    • Industry Standard PM Certification
    • Based upon PMBOK standards
    • Continuing Certification Requirement
    Page PMP Pre-requisites Category Category 1 Category 2 General Education Bachelor's degree High School Diploma PM Education 35 Contact hrs 35 Contact hrs PM Experience 4,500 hrs and 36 mos. exp within the last 8 years 7,500 hrs and 60 mos exp within the last 8 years Code of Professional Conduct Yes Yes
  • 83. Today’s Agenda
    • Why Project Management?
    • Excerpts from the ACEND Project Management curriculum
    • The advantages of Project Management proficiency
    • Summary
  • 84. Summary
    • Project management is a subset of general management and is both an art and a science
    • Project managers represent all the stakeholders within their project
    • Project managers are proactive in that they plan for quality deliverables as well as for risks
    • The road to PMP ® requires training, experience and exam preparation
  • 85. Summary
    • ACEND has the curriculum and the instructors
      • Skill set
      • Certification
    • Talk with your ACEND Point of Contact
    • Questions and answers