STAAR Pilot Project
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

STAAR Pilot Project

on

  • 281 views

Kathleen Bethke

Kathleen Bethke
Ace Conference 2013
Austin, Texas

Statistics

Views

Total Views
281
Views on SlideShare
281
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    STAAR Pilot Project STAAR Pilot Project Presentation Transcript

    • STAAR Pilot Project  Review of Year 1  Kathleen Bethke  ACE Training Consultant  STAAR Lead 
    • ObjecCves  •  Review criteria/requirements of SPP  •  A look at preliminary Year 1 results  •  Review of how findings will impact the future  of ACE  •  A look at NYOS 
    • Celebrate  •  Total SPP Students  •  Total New Students  •  Preliminary Results 
    • SPP Requirements  •  Data‐Driven Design  •  IntenConal Recruitment  •  Targeted ScienCfically‐Based IntervenCon  •  Targeted, IntenConal Enrichment  •  SMART Goals  •  Research QuesCons  •  Fidelity Tools  •  Pre‐ and Post‐Assessments 
    • SPP Programs  9  3  3  0  2  4  6  8  10  Mixed FTF/Online  FTF Only  Online Only  8  6  1  0  2  4  6  8  10  ELA & Math  ELA Only  Math Only  Types of IntervenCons  Content Focus 
    • Total SPP Students  Grantee  Proposed Students  Students Served 30+ days  New Students  AusCn   120  120  70  CIS SA  72  63  27  CIS SEHC  100  83  78  Ft Worth 6  72  72  35  Ft Worth 7  72  55  14  Harlingen   450  255  326  HCDE  140‐280  177  1  NYOS  40  45  13  Reg 13‐Bartle`  50  59  14  Richardson  442  364  37  Sherman  270  208  187  Snyder  120  15  71  Taylor  160  164  96  Temple  126  126  88  Valley View  280  210  3  TOTAL  2602  1812  1051 
    • Preliminary Results  •  Sherman ISD – Power Reading    2490 months of reading improvement in 4 months, an average of 11 months with a range of 2 months to 24 months  of improvement (24 months is equivalent of 2 ½ school years!)  •  Taylor – IstaHon, Think Through Math    85% of SPP students improved reading proficiency    69% of SPP students improved math proficiency    56% of SPP students who were “on the bubble” in January were “off the bubble” in May resulCng in significant  increases in STAAR assessment passing percentages (as high as      >70% exceeding State Stds in Reading at both campuses and >45% exceeding State Stds in Math at      Passman  •       Temple – Sylvan ACE It!    When compared to non‐SPP students of similar demographics, SPP students scored 6.02 points higher on STAAR  Reading Assessments.    When compared to non‐SPP students of similar demographics, SPP students scored 10.44  points higher on STAAR  WriCng Assessments    SPP students had 44% lower absences and 43% lower disciplinary referrals when compared to non‐SPP students of  similar demographics.  •  CIS – SEHC – Kids College    79% of the students parCcipaCng in SPP for math either passed or improved their score on the STAAR math assessment.    56.5% of the 108 Regular SPP students passed the STAAR test for the subject in which they were tutored.  31% of the  108 SPP Students passed at least one addiConal STAAR subject test.  11.25% of the SPP students did not pass any  STAAR subject, but improved from last year’s scores.  
    • Common Barriers  •  Secondary Student recruitment and retenCon  •  Providing intenConal enrichment for SPP students  •  Genng parents to allow students to stay for  enrichment (or only planning 1 hour of  intervenCon)  •  Genng core day to see the importance of  intenConally aligned enrichment  •  Managing SPP and tradiConal ACE program  •  Managing  the requirements from State  Evaluators 
    • Common Themes  •  Computer‐based IntervenCons (Think Through Math,  Achieve 3000, etc.)  •  Computer‐based IntervenCons with Reciprocal/Guided  Learning  •  Reciprocal/Guided Learning IntervenCon  •  Student Centered Learning (giving students a voice in  learning)  •  Highly Qualified Staff  •  Lack of Staff:Student InteracCon in some intervenCons  •  Low Staff:Student RaCos  •  More purposeful planning 
    • Best PracCces  •  Alignment to student need for both academic  intervenCon and enrichment  •  Campus:Aperschool CollaboraCon  •  Highly Qualified Teachers  •  Low Staff:Student RaCos  •  IntenConal Recruitment  •  Engaging Learning Environment (Reciprocal  Learning, Guided Learning, Student Voice,  IntenConal Enrichment) 
    • What SPP Findings Mean For The  Future  •  IntenConal academic intervenCons  •  Academically aligned enrichment  •  IntenConal recruitment  •  ScienCfically and/or evidence‐based learning  strategies embedded in every acCvity  •  Fidelity measurement tools   •  More coaching/mentoring to help programs  reach desired quality goals  •  Everything is connected 
    • A Look At NYOS 
    • NYOS Charter School,  Inc.  STAAR Pilot Program  Alyssa Moore  Project Director  amoore@nyos.org 
    • APPROACH TO DESIGN •  Cognitively Guided Instruction  –  SMART Boards  •  Essential Skills and Mentoring Minds software  –  Student and Parent Laptops  •  Parent Math Numeration Classes and software  classes  •  Mentoring Program 
    • Students work together to develop and verbalize their own strategies to solve problems using manipulatives.
    • •  Benchmarks  o  BOY, MOY, EOY campus developed STAAR assessments  •  Progress monitoring data  o  Essential Skills software  •  Students, parents and teachers may track progress  o  Mentoring Minds software  •  Teachers monitor student progress TEK by TEK  •  Attendance Records  •  Laptop check­out logs  •  Mentor Logs 
    • •  Training sign­in sheets  •  ACE program leader observation forms  •  Principal observation forms  •  Lesson plan review by Site Coordinator  •  Center leaders and school leaders meet monthly to  review progress  •  Center leaders, school leaders and teachers meet every  9 weeks to analyze data 
    • Beginning of Year Benchmark (BOY)  •  All students that scored a 70 or below on  math benchmark were referred into the  program  •  Teacher referral 
    • •  BOY (Beginning of Year) Math Benchmark: 53% of  NYOS K­3rd graders were BELOW level in Math.  •  MOY (Middle of Year) Math Benchmark: 21% of NYOS  K­3rd graders were BELOW level in Math  •  EOY (End of Year) Math Benchmark: 12% of NYOS K­3rd  graders were BELOW level in Math 
    • Enrichment Activity  When I Grow Up  College and Career Readiness 
    • •  Needs Inventory  •  How can we relate math to career readiness?  •  Reviewed STAAR Math Reporting Categories 1 & 2 and  started to brainstorm how we could “sneak” those  TEKS into fun, hands­on enrichment lessons  •  Chose an experienced counselor to lead activity  development 
    • •  Google “School Career Days” for original pool of  careers as examples for students to choose from  •  Google “Crafts for Careers” to see if fun, hands­on  activities already existed  o  Counselor tweaks the activity to meet our program needs  •  Appropriate grade level  •  Align with STAAR Math Reporting Categories 1 & 2  o  All students participated in the same activities for the 2 weeks so that  students and activity leaders could gain a sense for how the activity is  implemented  o  At the end of the 2 weeks students were asked to choose which activities they  wanted to learn about 
    • •  Students asked to write down their top 5 careers that  they would like to learn about  •  All choices were graphed as a class  •  The 5 most popular careers were the winners  o  Students voted on the order in which they would learn about each career 
    • •  Activity leaders discuss career with students  •  Students are asked what math skills they think would  be used in that particular career  •  Activity leader compiles a list of the math skills and  turns that list over to the counselor planning the  activity  •  The counselor researches the projects/activities and  gives the activity leaders and students a foundation to  build on  o  The counselor provides the students with a topic but the students come up  with the activities­ math problems, games, realections, etc. 
    • •  Once activity is implemented with the students the  activity leader completes a realection feedback form  and turns that in to the counselor   •  Counselor makes revisions to the activity based on  student and teacher feedback
    • •  All activities are project­ based  •  Students experience  airst­hand how the math  they are learning in  school can relate to their  future careers 
    • •  Follow 1 “E” per day  •  Monday  o  Students learn about their career  •  Tuesday – Thursday  o  Students work on aligned  activities  •  Math Problems  •  Projects  •  Games  •  Arts and Crafts  o  Parent Involvement  •  Friday  o  Project completion 
    • •  Career Activity Examples  o  Dancer­ dance studio  o  Photographer  o  Detective  o  Construction worker  •  Engineers  •  Popsicle stick city  o  Veterinarian  o  Fashion Designer  o  Artist­ sculptures  o  Police ofaicer  o  Librarian  o  Business owner­ hats and shirts 
    • Kathleen Bethke kathleen.bethke@mytexasace.org Alyssa Moore amoore@nyos.org