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1 2 japanese_syllabary

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The slideshow is about Japanese Syllabary.

The slideshow is about Japanese Syllabary.

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  • 1. 1) Basic syllables There are forty-six basic hiragana (also katakana) syllables, which are listed below. Once you memorize these charts, you will have the skill to transcribe all of the Japanese sounds. The romaji chart is given for general pronunciation reference. *The syllables , , , and are romanized as fu, shi, chi, and tsu, respectively, which is closer to the English pronunciation. ** is also pronounced as “o“, however, since this is only used as a particle, it is sometimes written and managed as “ wo” in romanized distinctively from the basic syllable .
  • 2. Basic syllables/ Hiragana
  • 3. Basic syllables/ Katakana
  • 4. Basic syllables/ Romaji
  • 5. 2) Syllables with Diacritical Marks You can transcribe 23 additional sounds by adding diacritical marks. With a pair of short diagonal strokes ( ” ), the unvoiced consonants k, s, t, and h become voiced consonants g, z, d and b. The consonant h changes to p with the addition of a small circle ( ° ). * ( ji ) and ( zu ) are pronounced the same as ( ji ) and ( zu ) , respectively, and have limited use.
  • 6. 3) Transcribing Contracted Sounds Small , , and followed after letters in the second column i-vowel hiragana/i-Dan ( except ) and are used to transcribe contracted sounds. The contracted sound represents a single syllable.
  • 7. Transcribing Contracted Sounds/ Hiragana
  • 8. Transcribing Contracted Sounds/ Katakana
  • 9. Transcribing Contracted Sounds/ Romaji

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