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Maximising digital engagement and inclusion 2.0
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  • PREZE PRESENTATION on aging
  • ** Action plan: If someone does ask for something, how will you ensure it is delivered in a timely fashion without everyone running around clueless.
  • ** Action plan: If someone does ask for something, how will you ensure it is delivered in a timely fashion without everyone running around clueless.
  • Legal:Create an Organisational Web Accessibility Policy to strategically embed accessibility into the organisations business as usualInclude accessibility inWeb procurement policyWeb technology policyWeb production standards (eg compliance with WCAG 2.0, browser support, AT support)For EVERY PRODUCT, follow us user centred production processThe process identified the key decisions which impact whether the product will include or exclude disabled and elderly peopleAcross the whole of the web product’s lifecycle
  • For example, in the beginning we used to send all our digital marketing material to one person to have the colour contrast checked (WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.4.3 Contrast (minimum)). This became an unnecessary burden on our Web Accessibility Evangelist and became a bottleneck in our approval process. It was such a simple thing to organise a 30-minute training session in-house and now our marketing team are empowered to take responsibility for their part of their job that relates to WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.4.3 Contrast (minimum).C
  • Everyone needs to adopt an accessibility mindset;But having a web accessibility evangelist or specialist on the team with senior management endorsement is a valueable asset.This is a role that requires specialist skills and knowledge that broaches the technical, business and marketing function — too much for it to be successfully executed as only part of someone's role. Organisations making a commitment to web accessibility should seriously consider employing an individual (or two) who has senior management buy-in and authority who is responsible for the education and implementation of web accessibility principles and procedures across business functions.This type of resource may be difficult to find since web accessibility skills are not so common, supplementing the efforts of this person by engaging an external consultant specialising in the area of organisational implementation will certainly assist in ensuring WCAG 2.0 is correctly interpretedopen-minded facilitators seek solutions to business problems — but it helps if you frame your questions to get useful outcomes.Open minded facilitators: "What do we have to do to make an infographic accessible?" That garnered a completely different response. See our accessible infographic on web accessibility.There are often practical, simple and cost effective solutions that comply with web accessibility — open-mindedness will certainly deliver them.EDUCATE YOUR SUPPLIERS:It's tempting to put a sneaky line item in your request for proposal or functional specifications issued to partners and suppliers that says "Must comply with WCAG 2.0 Level AA." Taking this approach without intending to support your suppliers will only cause significant headaches and hardships. Where possible, be prepared to hand-hold on the first few projects if your suppliers are new to web accessibility.PLAN FOR INCREASED DELIVERY TIMES WHILE YOU’RE LEARNING: When you start implementing web accessibility principles, expect a steep learning curve initially. With the right team in place, that curve will decrease quickly but don't get frustrated when things take longer to deliver — plan for it. We committed to providing PDF versions for our premium content, which naturally need to be accessible. This has been a job that has taken much longer than anticipated and has been a big learning process — worthwhile of course, but time-consuming none the less.

Maximising digital engagement and inclusion 2.0 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Maximising Digital Engagement andInclusionStrategic web accessibility managementAmajjika KumaraBusiness Director , Access iQ™amajjka@accessiq.org@amajjika
  • 2. Digital engagement and inclusionEveryone should have the potential tointeract with the economy and society viathe internet in some way that addressestheir needs.
  • 3. Web AccessibilityA key vehicle for digital inclusion.Social changes will make web accessibility anecessity.
  • 4. Strategic Web AccessibilityManagementYour strategy should result from thinkingabout how to change the future, whilebearing in mind the realities of the present.
  • 5. Strategic Web AccessibilityManagementAccessibility in practice Making decisions about what (and what not) to do. The art of marrying what is desired with what is feasible. Building alternative solutions into the process Finding ways that do not diminish your ability to achieve the goal or your desire/buy-in to get there.
  • 6. Elements of the strategyStrategy components: Desired outcome: Who: What: How: Resources:  Internal  External
  • 7. Elements of the strategyStrategy components: Desired outcome: It’s not desired - we have to do this! Who: Anyone but me What: I don’t know I’m so confused! How: Have no idea, that’s why I’m here Resources: Are you kidding?  Internal – No knowledge, no time  External – No budget
  • 8. Access iQ approachStrategy components: Desired outcome: Mission - web without limits Who: Users of all abilities What: Inclusion in all digital experiences in some way How: Adopting accessibility as an organisational principle, Level AA compliant website Resources:  Internal – Board and CEO buy in, web accessibility evangelist, project manager, enthusiastic team  External – Web developers, accessibility specialists, key stakeholders
  • 9. CAVEAT EMPTOR – let the buyer beware!• Quick wins do not fix the process but can provide a great training ground for embedding accessibility within your organisation.• Quick wins can create more problems if accessibility is not part of your standard business practices.• Some quick wins are no-brainers eg: accessible content and captioning of video’s.
  • 10. Accessibility Statements are a must!Don’t be afraid to say your site is an accessibilitywork in progress.Tell people about known bugs, problems andprovide people with disabilities with a contactnumber to get help the help that they need.
  • 11. Disability Action PlanLodge it with the Human Rights CommissionSignifies your commitment.
  • 12. Embedding Responsibility Obtain a statement of your starting point – accessibility audit. Work out who is responsible for what  Role based division of responsibility Delegate and monitor results Appropriate training is essential
  • 13. Senior Mgt Accountability CSR GovernanceFinance Legal Marketing Dept/line Mgt ITC Web tech policy Accessible Design Commitment Web prod stdsWeb Risk Assessment Accessible content Accountability Accessibility Statementprocurement Contract creationpolicy Product Project Accessibility Comms Managers Managers Accessible Content Evangelist User centred Management Governance/education processes Content Designers Testers Technical Team Accessibility Testing Accessible development Accessible content Accessible Design
  • 14. ICT Accessibility Maturity Model ScorecardBusiness Taskforce on Accessible TechnologyFocus Areas Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Informal Defined Repeatable Managed Optimised Top down commitment Active strategyBusiness Drivers No senior buy-in Strategy in place /involvement management Pioneers and leaders Basic standards High standards / Influencer / earlyStandards and Standards in regular use Minimal or unclear documented / used continuous adopter of newGuidance ad-hoc / actively promoted improvement standardsGovernance and Process defined / ContinuousRisk Management Not defined minimal actual Active governance improvement / Suppliers influencedProcesses governance strategic view Some budget Investment strategy / Effective budget / Specific funding forResources and Not allocated or provided / clear support services in benefit innovation / usercost impact controlled responsibilities place management empowermentDelivery (Design, Lifecycle stages Fully integrated Proven standards Minimal inclusion in requirements Innovation andbuild, test, development lifecycle documented / including UAT by staff compliance / design excellenceimplement) and customers metrics collected applied ad-hoc Processes Regular use includingProcurement and Minimal inclusion in Proactive and documented and non-compliance Supplier partnershipssupplier contracts procurement processes used ad-hoc management supportive Limited legacy Priority legacy systems Systems mostly All legacy systemsLegacy Systems Low accessibility accessibility / Strategy made accessible accessible made accessible in placeReasonable Integrated process Active Basic process used Innovation / sharingAdjustment Minimal / Reactive ad-hoc promoted and in management within of best practiceProcesses regular use service levels
  • 15. Focus Areas Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Informal Defined Repeatable Managed OptimisedICT Accessibility Maturity Model Scorecard Top down Active strategy Pioneers and Business Drivers No senior buy-in Strategy in place commitment management leaders /involvement Basic standards Standards in regular High standards / Influencer / earlyStandards and Minimal or unclear documented / use / actively continuous adopter of newGuidance used ad-hoc promoted improvement standardsGovernance and Process defined / Continuous SuppliersRisk Management Not defined minimal actual Active governance improvement / influencedProcesses governance strategic view Specific funding Some budget Investment strategy / Effective budget /Resources and Not allocated or for innovation / provided / clear support services in benefitcost impact controlled responsibilities place management user empowermentDelivery (Design, Lifecycle stages Minimal inclusion in Fully integrated Proven standards requirements Innovation andbuild, test, development documented / including UAT by staff compliance / design excellenceimplement) lifecycle and customers metrics collected applied ad-hoc Processes documented and Minimal inclusion in Regular use includingProcurement and used ad-hoc but Proactive and Supplier procurement non-compliancesupplier contracts processes placing management supportive partnerships responsibility on suppliers Limited legacy Priority legacy Systems mostly All legacy systemsLegacy Systems Low accessibility accessibility / systems made accessible made accessible Strategy in place accessibleReasonable Active Integrated process Innovation / Basic process used managementAdjustment Minimal / Reactive ad-hoc promoted and in within service sharing of bestProcesses regular use practice levels
  • 16. Process, process, processIdeally you should Fix the problem in the PROCESS NOT the PRODUCT To prevent the problem from RE-OCCURING But you, like me, might need to get some runs on the board NOW!
  • 17. Educate the team Educating team members on free web accessibility tools as they pertain to specific roles. WAVE toolbar or Web Accessibility Toolbar (WAT) - IE It would also help if some key technical resources became familiar in how to use screen readers like JAWS and NVDA.CAVEATS: Only about 30% of success criteria can be tested by machines; To correctly use accessibility tools, you need to understand what you are looking at and how it relates to WCAG.
  • 18. Engage accessibility specialists Doing it yourselves can be non-productive and cost more in the long run. Web accessibility is an industry made up of specialist fields. Expert detailed reports are the best place to start
  • 19. Other important steps Commit to web accessibility by formalising it in a job role Employ open-minded web accessibility facilitators Be prepared to educate your suppliers Expect an initial 20-50 per cent increase in effort to complete some tasks
  • 20. What are yourchallenges?1. What role do you perform?2. Size of organisation.3. Number of legacy systems or presence of legacy issues4. Senior management buy-in5. What’s worked, what hasn’t
  • 21. Level 3, 616-620 Harris StUltimo NSW 2007t: +61 2 8218 9320e: knowhow@accessiq.org @accessiqSlideshare: Access iQaccessiq.orgWeb accessibility know how