Accessibility for social media platforms

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Community Relations Custodian Chris Pycroft presented at the Disability Education Association of NSW and ACT on how often social media platforms are accessed, accessibility barriers, and what you can …

Community Relations Custodian Chris Pycroft presented at the Disability Education Association of NSW and ACT on how often social media platforms are accessed, accessibility barriers, and what you can do to make your content on social media as accessible as possible.

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  • Access iQ: Non-profit that aims to create “a web without limits”. Workings with business and government to make internet accessible Initiative of Media Access Australia, non-profit that has worked with disability groups, orgs and consumers since 2005
  • Focusing on Twitter, Linkedin and Facebook.
  • Once a day: 72% of 20-29 yo, 65% of 14-19yoACMA: 2008 Report – 64% of ‘young peoples’ time on the internet is spent on social networking websitesOverall: 89% of 20-29 year olds use SM once a week, 86% of 14-17 yo, 62% of 30-39 yo, 45% of 40-49 yo, 44% of 50-64yo, 23% of 65+ACMA: 2008 Report – 64% of ‘young peoples’ time on the internet is spent on social networking websitesOnce a day: Figures reduced for 30+ - 43% 30-39 yo, 24% 40-49 yo, 22% 50-64 yo, and 9% 65+Increased/stayed the same: 81% 30-39yo, 65% 40-49yo, 80% 50-64yo, and 85% 65+
  • Overall: 89% of 20-29 year olds use SM once a week, 86% of 14-17 yo, 62% of 30-39 yo, 45% of 40-49 yo, 44% of 50-64yo, 23% of 65+ACMA: 2008 Report – 64% of ‘young peoples’ time on the internet is spent on social networking websitesOnce a day: Figures reduced for 30+ - 43% 30-39 yo, 24% 40-49 yo, 22% 50-64 yo, and 9% 65+Increased/stayed the same: 81% 30-39yo, 65% 40-49yo, 80% 50-64yo, and 85% 65+
  • Overall: 89% of 20-29 year olds use SM once a week, 86% of 14-17 yo, 62% of 30-39 yo, 45% of 40-49 yo, 44% of 50-64yo, 23% of 65+ACMA: 2008 Report – 64% of ‘young peoples’ time on the internet is spent on social networking websitesOnce a day: Figures reduced for 30+ - 43% 30-39 yo, 24% 40-49 yo, 22% 50-64 yo, and 9% 65+Increased/stayed the same: 81% 30-39yo, 65% 40-49yo, 80% 50-64yo, and 85% 65+
  • 20-29 yo: Smartphones 83%, Laptop 79%, Desktop 54%14-19 yo: Laptop 77%, Smartphone 61%, Desktop 48%
  • 97% of 14-19yo, 99% of 20-29yo, 98% for 30-39yo, 94% of 40-49 yo, 93% of 50-64yo, 97% of 65+31 times a week: 24 times a week by 30-39 yo, between 6-10 for 40+.31 times a week x 17.52 visit = Over 9 hours a week spent on Facebook31 times for YP is in comparison to 20 times overall
  • Despite considerably lower figures, figures for 14-29 year olds are higher than any other group. 30-39 next, followed by 50-64.No age breakdown for Twitter. YouTube, Linkedin, Facebook surveyed.
  • 16% of 20-29 year olds; third highestAverage: Linkedin 4.89 times per week vs. Facebook (20.6) and Twitter (22.65)
  • 3 most common reasons for using social networking sites:Catch up with family or friendsShare photos or videosTo co-ordinate parties or activities
  • Over 2.5 million Australians have a vision or hearing impairment. Number of vision impaired Australians will double to 1 million by 2020.
  • Colour contrast: Ensures that there is enough of a contrast between colour of the text and the background behind it. Helpful to users with a vision impairment.Keyboard navigation: Important because people with a vision impairment don’t know where to click or people can’t use a mouse.Assistive technologies: VoiceOver for iOS. TalkBack, SoundBack for Android. NVDA screen reader, commonly used on Windows computers. Magnifier. Zoom, Voiceover and Braille support available for Macs.
  • 12 principles of WCAG.Examples of things that were reviewed: Text alternatives for non-text content, making text readable and understandable, helping users navigating and find content.Sociability report has ‘how to’s’ on social media basic functionality of Twitter, Facebook and LinkedInResearch: Linkedin most accessible, Facebook second, Twitter last
  • Mention Scott, relationship with MAASociability report has ‘how to’s’ on social media basic functionality of twitter, facebook and LinkedIn
  • Facely HD App – iOS devices only. Provides an accessible interface, and interacts with the VoiceOver screen reader.Facebook accessibility: @fbaccess, Facebook accessibility page. Facebook report issue page: https://www.facebook.com/help/contact/?id=169372943117927
  • Facely HD App – iOS devices only. Provides an accessible interface.
  • Different retweets, links more clearly visible. Also shows what you’ve tweeted last.
  • Support staff: All have been known to help, Facebook accessibility team, contact through TwitterAccessibility community: Facebook groups (FB a11y team page), #a11y, Linkedin GroupFacebook form: https://www.facebook.com/help/contact/?id=169372943117927
  • 5 tips!
  • Exact same message: Accessibility. Each has different requirements (character limits). Hootsuite – A tool that you can decide what platforms you post on.
  • Images: Making a comment provides a text alternative; facebook doesn’t have this functionality. Allows assistive technology to read what it is. No text exclusively within an image.Videos: Facebook player is default, less accessible. If posting a new video, upload to YouTube. Can do own captions using Amara.
  • Videos: Facebook player is default, less accessible. If posting a new video, upload to YouTube. Can do own captions using Amara.
  • Hashtags: Assistive technology reads out a link

Transcript

  • 1. Accessibility for social media platformsDisability Education Association NSW/ACTProfessional Development Day – 30 April 2013Chris Pycroft (@chrispytweets)Community Relations Custodian
  • 2. AgendaThree key topics will be covered in today‟spresentation: How often is social media accessed? Social media and accessibility How to make your social media content asaccessible as possible
  • 3. How often is social mediaaccessed?
  • 4. The short answer … a lot!More than two thirds of people aged 14-29access social media at least once a day.Almost two thirds of the time that young peoplespend on the internet is spent on socialnetworking sites.
  • 5. Okay … maybe more than a lot!Nine out of ten Australians aged 14-29 use socialmedia at least once a week.Almost two thirds of people aged 14-29 think theamount of time they are spending on social mediais increasing or staying the same.
  • 6. Is it only 14-29 year olds?Social media use has increased or stayed the samefor: 81% of 30-39 year olds 65% of 40-49 year olds 80% of 50-64 year olds 85% of 65+ year oldsWhat does this mean?Everyone is using social media more than ever.
  • 7. How is social media accessed?Under 30 Over 40
  • 8. FacebookAlmost every person in Australia that uses socialmedia has a Facebook account.14-29 year olds spend nine hours a week onFacebook.
  • 9. TwitterTwitter is visited more often than any other socialnetworking platform (23 times a week)Around one in five 14-29 year olds who use socialmedia access Twitter.It‟s also popular with the 30-39 and 50-64 agegroups.
  • 10. LinkedInThe more „experienced‟ a person gets, the more likelythey are to use LinkedIn.LinkedIn is used: Most by 40-49 year olds (28%) Least by 14-19 year olds (1%)It is accessed less frequently; 50% of users visit no morethan twice a week.
  • 11. References 2012 Yellow Social Media Report(http://about.sensis.com.au/news/2012-yellow-social-media-report/) Internet use and social networking by youngpeople (Australian Communications and MediaAuthority (ACMA), 2008)(http://www.acma.gov.au/webwr/_assets/main/lib310665/no1_internet_use_social_networking_young_people.pdf)
  • 12. Social media and accessibility
  • 13. What is web accessibility?Web accessibility means that people withdisabilities can use the internet.Web accessibility means that as many people aspossible can interact, navigate and understandthe web.
  • 14. Other statisticsThe number of Australians with a visionimpairment will reach one million by 2020.One in six Australians can‟t hear multimediacontent on the web.
  • 15. Facebook demonstrationhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhpIqmgQbRo
  • 16. What are the accessibilityissues?Particular accessibility issues continually raised: Incompatible with assistive technology Colour contrast Keyboard navigation Captioned videos Alternative text
  • 17. Incompatible with assistivetechnologyAccessibility features are often built intocomputers, tablets or smart phones. These include: Screen reader or VoiceOver Zoom / MagnifierIf the technology doesn‟t work with a website, thenpeople with a disability won‟t be able to accesscontent on it.
  • 18. Colour contrastA lack of contrast between the colour of text andits background means people with a visionimpairment can‟t see it properly.
  • 19. Keyboard navigationAnyone who can‟t use a mouse must be able tonavigate a website using a keyboard only .This includes people with a vision impairment(who don‟t know where to click a mouse), orpeople with a physical disability who can‟t move amouse.
  • 20. Captioned videosA video without captions means that any personwith a hearing impairment can‟t hear it.Any video, such as a lecture, should includecaptions or a transcript to make it accessible.
  • 21. Alternative textAlternative text conveys the message of what isbeing shown in an image.It allows people with a vision impairment tounderstand what meaning the image provides.
  • 22. Alternative textIncorrect: “Man at microphone.”Correct: “US President Barack Obama making aspeech.”
  • 23. Are social networking websitesaccessible?Short answer: Not as much as we‟d like them to be.If a part of a popular website isn‟t accessible, there isoften a workaround.LinkedIn has proven to be more accessible thanFacebook and Twitter.
  • 24. Research on social mediaaccessibilityMedia Access Australia released a SociABILITYreport in 2012, reviewing accessibility of socialnetworks.(http://www.mediaaccess.org.au/sites/default/files/files/MAA2657-%20Report-OnlineVersion.pdf)Report also contains how to’s for beginners.
  • 25. Accessibility: FacebookAlternative solutions for using Facebook: Use the mobile version of the website instead ofthe full (desktop) version. Use keyboard shortcuts(http://www.facebook.com/help/?page=440) Use Facely HD App – available for Apple devices.
  • 26. Accessibility: TwitterAlternative solutions for using Twitter: Use mobile applications: Twitter Twitterific Use the mobile version of the website. Use EasyChirp.
  • 27. Twitter Newsfeed
  • 28. Twitter Newsfeed on EasyChirp
  • 29. Accessibility: LinkedinAlternative solutions for using Linkedin: Use Google to search for a particular person youwould like to connect with: Example: “Chris Pycroft LinkedIn” Use applications instead of the main website.
  • 30. Accessibility: All platformsIf you know someone experiencing accessibilityissues: Encourage them to connect with support staff forthe social platform. Reach out to accessibility communities.
  • 31. How to make your social mediacontent as accessible as possible
  • 32. Where are you putting yourcontent?Never put information that may benefit someoneexclusively on social media, as it may not beaccessible to them.Always ensure information is communicated in analternative format.
  • 33. Syncing of content across socialplatformsAvoid putting the exact same message on eachsocial platform you use.Different platforms have different purposes anddifferent audiences.The more diverse your social media usage is, themore effective your content will be.
  • 34. Posting an image on FacebookAfter posting an image, make a comment thatconveys the purpose and meaning of the image.
  • 35. Posting about a video?No other video player is as accessible as YouTube, andmost alternative players do not support captions.Be aware of automatic captions.
  • 36. Want to include hashtags in yourtweet?Make sure any #hashtag is at the start or the end ofyour tweet.A screen reader will read out the hashtag as alink, and will interrupt the information you‟recommunicating.
  • 37. SummarySocial media is here to stay!While there are accessibility barriers, there areworkarounds.Always cater for the widest audience wherepossible, as you never know who has a disability.
  • 38. Web accessibility know howSlides will be available on Slidesharehttp://www.slideshare.net/accessiqLevel 3, 616-620 Harris StUltimo NSW 2007t: +61 2 8218 9320e: knowhow@accessiq.org@accessiqaccessiq.org