Space Elevator Module
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Space Elevator Module

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  • Shape Memory Alloy module - Title Page
  • Image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Kohlenstoffnanoroehre_Animation.gif, GNU free documentation license by http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benutzer:Schwarzm
  • Artist Pat Rawling's ( http://www.patrawlings.com) concept of a space elevator viewed from the geostationary transfer station looking down along the length of the elevator toward Earth.
  • http://www.dorlingkindersley-uk.co.uk/static/cs/uk/11/clipart/
  • http://www.dorlingkindersley-uk.co.uk/static/cs/uk/11/clipart/
  • Image thanks to Dorling Kindersley http://www.dorlingkindersley-uk.co.uk/
  • http://www.enterprisemission.com/
  • Research can be based on the questions how, what, when, where and why. Students should formulate these questions.
  • http://www.enterprisemission.com/
  • Nanotube image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Eight_Allotropes_of_Carbon.png, GNU free documentation license, courtesy of Michael Strock http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Mstroeck Reference for weight info: K. Banerjee and N. Srivastava, "Are Carbon Nanotubes the future of VLSI Interconnections?", ACM Design Automation Conference, 2006, pp. 809-814.
  • Image thanks to http://www.flickr.com/photos/erikcharlton/2303709058/ (creative commons license)
  • Nanotube image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Eight_Allotropes_of_Carbon.png, GNU free documentation license, courtesy of Michael Strock http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Mstroeck Teachers should emphasize awareness of the concept that molecular structure determines properties and therefore function Movable 3D models of carbon allotropes can be viewed here: http://www.creative-chemistry.org.uk/molecules/carbon.htm This website also very useful: http://mrsec.wisc.edu/Edetc/cineplex/nanotube/index.html
  • Images: Nanotube image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Eight_Allotropes_of_Carbon.png, GNU free documentation license, courtesy of Michael Strock http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Mstroeck http://inventorspot.com/articles/space_elevator_competition_shows_7648 Artist Pat Rawling's ( http://www.patrawlings.com) concept of a space elevator viewed from the geostationary transfer station looking down along the length of the elevator toward Earth.
  • Images: Both structure images from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fullerene Phone image http://www.flickr.com/photos/compujeramey/168108824/ (creative commons license)
  • Structure image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Diamond_and_graphite.jpg Dentist image (http://www.flickr.com/photos/betsssssy/530507000/) and d iamond image http://www.flickr.com/photos/swamibu/1182138940/ (creative commons license)
  • Structure image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Diamond_and_graphite.jpg Tennis image thanks to http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuseeger/2419642327/ (creative commons license) Pencil image thanks to http://www.flickr.com/photos/orangeacid/204163563/ (creative commons license) Phone image http://www.flickr.com/photos/compujeramey/168108824/ (creative commons license)
  • Image thanks to http://www.flickr.com/photos/emeryjl/511012252/ (creative commons license)
  • Info and images from http://www.spaceward.org/elevator2010
  • End title

Space Elevator Module Space Elevator Module Presentation Transcript

  • Space Elevator
  • Module Outcomes
    • What is a space elevator, and why would it be so useful?
    • What sort of material could we build a space elevator from?
    • Why do different materials have different properties?
    • What are carbon nanotubes, and how can we learn about them?
    In this module we will address the following questions: Images: Benuzter:Scharm@wikipedia
  • Space Elevator Concept Artist Pat Rawlings concept of a space elevator viewed from the geostationary transfer station looking down along the length of the elevator toward Earth. Image: Courtesy Pat Rawlings
  • What If You Could Build A Stairway To The Moon? Image: © Dorling Kindersley
  • What If A Path To The Stars Was Paved In Carbon? Image: © Dorling Kindersley
  • Houston, We Have A Problem… Image: © Dorling Kindersley
    • On 20 May the toilet broke down on the International Space Station…..
    • It wasn’t until 5 June that a shuttle arrived with the parts needed to repair the toilet.
    • That’s a very long time to wait.
    • Imagine if the astronauts and cosmonauts were running out of water, or air? How could the repair parts be delivered to them in time?
  • Space Elevator: A New Way To Reach The Stars
    • The Space Elevator is a cable-like tool which could connect the Earth with a fixed structure in outer space. - It would provide a permanent link between Earth and outer space.
    Image: Courtesy The Enterprise Mission
  • Let’s Learn More About Space Elevators View the Space Elevator animation and then conduct research as guided by your teacher. Image: Courtesy Pat Rawlings
  • Space Elevator: Summary Image: Courtesy The Enterprise Mission
    • The Space Elevator is a theoretical concept. - it would provide a permanent link between Earth and space.
    • The cable in a Space Elevator could only be constructed from an extremely strong, flexible and lightweight material, such as carbon nanotubes.
  • Activities Activity 1 – T-Chart Examine the Space Elevator concept further by using the T chart to compare current technologies with the Space Elevator Activity 2 – KWLH Start the process of researching the Space Elevator in preparation for a later performance activity using the KWLH chart
  • Properties Of Carbon Nanotubes Image: [email_address]
    • Strong
    • – 200 times stronger than steel.
    • – the first synthetic material to have greater strength than spider silk.
    • Light
    • – 1 square kilometre = 30kg
    • Flexible
    • – Compared to most materials.
    • Heat resistant
    • – resists burning like a metal.
  • Carbon Nanotubes? Image: [email_address]
    • How can we explain the properties of carbon nanotubes?
    • What about other forms of carbon?
  • Experiment 1 Forms Of Carbon
    • Use these molecular images to do the Forms of Carbon Experiment
    Image: [email_address]
  • Forms Of Carbon: Nanotubes Images Top to Bottom: Mstroeck@wikipedia, Pat Rawlings Properties: strong, light, metal-like Molecular structure: carbon atoms in regular, tubular structure Application: space elevator cable
  • Forms Of Carbon: Buckyball Images Top to Bottom: Mstroeck@wikipedia, compujeramy@flickr Properties: light, semi-conductor or superconductor Molecular structure: carbon atoms in regular, circular structure Application: improved electronics
  • Forms Of Carbon: Diamond Images Clockwise: betsssssy@flickr, swamibu@flickr, wikipedia Properties: hard, clear, disperses light Molecular structure: carbon atoms in crystal structure Application: drill bits, jewellery
  • Forms Of Carbon: Graphite Images Clockwise: Wikipedia , orangeacid@flickr, compujeramey @flickr, [email_address] Properties: light, super lubricating, conductor Molecular structure: sheets of carbon atoms in regular, flat structure Application: pencil, sport equipment, electronics
  • Space Elevator: Performance Image: emeryjl@flickr
    • Write and perform a 5-10 minute drama that will teach other students and adults about space elevators and carbon nanotubes.
    • Groups of 5
    • Performance must include at least 10 scientific facts
    • Be creative!
  • Could You Win? Image: spaceward.org
    • Currently The Spaceward Foundation is running two competitions to design the space elevator.
    • A total of US$ 4 million is up for grabs.
    • Design either the climber (the elevator unit) or the tether (the “string”)
  • Activity 3 - Performance Create a performance to teach others about the Space Elevator and Carbon Nanotubes.
  • Summary
    • The Space Elevator is a new concept possible due to nanotechnology
    • Carbon nanotubes are a form of carbon, and have unique properties which can be explained by understanding their molecular structure
    • With proper referencing, the internet can be used as a first ‘port of call’ for new information and research
  • Revision
    • Why do scientists want to design a space elevator?
    • Carbon nanotubes would be an important construction material in the space elevator. Explain how and why they would be used.
    • List as many different types of carbon that you can.
    • What causes the types of carbon to have different properties?
  •