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Mocha milknotes april-june2010
 

Mocha milknotes april-june2010

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Governor Jim Doyle signed the...

Governor Jim Doyle signed the
Right To Breastfeed Act on March
10. This new law allows mothers
to breastfeed in public and private
places without being asked to leave
or harassed.

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    Mocha milknotes april-june2010 Mocha milknotes april-june2010 Document Transcript

    • MILK NOTES © PUBLISHED BY THE AFRICAN AMERICAN BREASTFEEDING NETWORK OF MILWAUKEE APRIL—JUNE 2010 ISSUE For more information and/or Wisconsin Becomes 45th State To Protect to register for these FREE services, please call Mothers Right To Breastfeed In Public (414) 264-3441 Governor Jim Doyle signed the Right To Breastfeed Act on March Sista2Sista Chat Room 10. This new law allows mothers A bi-monthly gathering for pregnant and breastfeeding moms to share in- to breastfeed in public and private formation, discuss concerns and dis- places without being asked to leave pel myths about breastfeeding. or harassed. Upcoming Dates “The law is a great victory for our August 12 and October 14 State, families and mothers,” said 5:30PM-7:00PM 4340 North 46th -ParkLawn YMCA Dalvery Blackwell, co-founder of Inside the Children’s Service Society the African American Breastfeeding Network of Milwaukee of WI Family Resource Center (AABN). “It will help tear down the stigma associated with breast- feeding babies in public and will help normalize breastfeeding,” Sista2Sista Home Visitation she said. Certified breastfeeding specialists A person who interferes with a mother’s right to breastfeed in pub- visit new mothers in the comfort of their homes for support. lic can be fined up to $200. There are 44 other states that have similar Pumpin’ It Out, laws protecting mothers. The Workin’ It Out© AABN plans to help promote and A two-hour class designed for moms publicize the new law by dissemi- who wish to provide breast milk to nating information to the media, their babies and are returning back to community leaders, healthcare pro- school/work 6 weeks after delivery or before. viders, and families. For more in- formation, call the AABN at (414) Breastfeeding Awareness 264-3441. Community Presentations WISCONSIN AABN is available to talk to groups RIGHT TO BREASTFEED ACT and organizations about the value and A mother may breastfeed her child in any public or private loca- benefits of breastfeeding for families, and our communities. tion where the mother and child are otherwise authorized to be. In such a location, no person may prohibit a mother from breast- feeding her child, direct a mother to move to another location to Babies Are breastfeed her child, direct a mother to cover her child or breast while breastfeeding, or otherwise restrict a mother from breast- Born feeding. To Breastfeed. State Statute 253.16
    • 2 Reasonable Break Time for Pacifiers Interfere with Breastfeeding Nursing Mothers is Now Law Some mothers call it the nokie, others call it the paci. It is also re- The 2010 Healthcare Reform ferred to as a nuk or a noo-noo. The Baby Center even received Act revised the Fair Labor 139 nicknames for the pacifier. A multi-billion dollar business in Standards Act (FLSA) by re- the U.S., the pacifier is synonymous with baby. Re- quiring that employers provide gardless of the rea- son a parent may choose a reasonable break time for an employee to express breast to use the nokie, pacifiers interfere milk for her nursing child. with breastfeed- ing. The African American Breast- feeding Network of • Under the Act, employers Milwaukee (AABN) agrees with must now provide a private, the American Academy of Pediatrics non-bathroom place for an (AAP) and other or- ganizations that using a employee to express breast pacifier should be delayed until breastfeeding is well es- milk. tablished, usually at about 3 to 4 weeks. Also AABN agrees that it • The FLSA does not require can delay effective suckling and interfere with breast milk supply. employers to pay employees The first month is important because the amount of milk a mother for such break time. makes in future months is determined by how often the baby nurses at the breasts in the first weeks. For the first 4 weeks after birth, • The law does not apply to the hormone prolactin increases as the baby nurses. Prolactin employers with less than 50 helps build and protect a mothers’ milk supply. Some doctors sug- employees. gest giving a pacifier only if a baby is premature or has medical • The law was effective imme- problems. Also, research shows that babies who use pacifier can diately upon President choke if part of the pacifier breaks. Other risks of using a pacifier Obama’s signing of the Pa- are thrush, ear infections, speech delay, teeth misalignment and tient Protection and Afford- shaping of the soft palate. able Care Act, however, en- forcement rules have not yet Sources: kellymom.com and pamf.org been put in place. Depart- ment of Labor is working diligently to establish these rules. The African American Breast- feeding Network (AABN) will be available to provide re- sources and support to busi- nesses and families once en- forcement rules have been es- tablished. For more informa- tion and written policy on breastfeeding and expressing breast milk in the workplace, go towww.usbreastfeeding.org.
    • 3 Mocha Profile: Alexis Gillespie KNOW YOUR FACTS The moment Alexis found ceived encouraged her to con- Smoking & Breastfeeding out that she was pregnant, she tinue breastfeeding. Alexis is Risks You Should Know decided to breastfeed. Her not afraid to breastfeed any- Mothers who breastfeed are advised not to mother breastfed her so she felt where. She recalls breastfeed- smoke, but if they cannot quit, it is probably still more valuable to breastfeed. it was the “right thing to do.” ing in public at Burlington The risks of smoking is small, but the benefits Few 23 year old moms have Coat Factory and two men be- of breastfeeding are bigger. This is the basic breastfed for as gan snickering. advice given to mothers by leading organiza- long as Alexis has. “They probably tions such as La Leche League and the Ameri- Ja’Karon will be 1 had never seen a can Academy of Family Physicians. year old on July 19; mom breastfeed If You Are Going To Smoke, Reduce Risks he has never had before,” she • Never smoke while pregnant and around formula; nor a paci- says. “Moms your baby and small children. fier and he receives should not be • Smoke fewer than 20 cigarettes. If the few bottles. afraid to breast- mother smokes fewer than twenty ciga- To her breastfeed- feed when their rettes a day, the risks to her baby getting ing came natural; babies get hun- from the nicotine in her milk are small. however, she had to gry.” Alexis is When a breastfeeding mother smokes more overcome some common prob- glad to hear about the new than twenty to thirty cigarettes a day, the lems. She called the hospital statewide law, the Right to risks increase. Heavy smoking can reduce a lactation specialist and her best Breastfeed Act, that allows a mother's milk supply and on rare occa- friend April when she had mom to breastfeed anywhere sions has caused symptoms in the breast- questions and needed advice. they are allowed to be. She feeding baby such as nausea, vomiting, She says the advice she re- feels that when more moms abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. Contd’ On Page 4 • Avoid nursing right after smoking. The amount of time it takes for half the nico- The Economics of NOT Breastfeeding tine to be eliminated from the body is Our country loses at least $13 ninety-five minutes. For this reason, a billion each year because of By NOT breastfeeding we lose… mother should avoid smoking just before low breastfeeding rates, ac- and certainly during a feeding. cording to an economic study $4.7 billion and 447 excess deaths due Common Problems for Babies published online, April 5 in the to sudden infant death syndrome • Addiction to Nicotine journal Pediatrics. Most of the (SIDS) • Increased risk of SIDS billions lost are related to in- • Increased risk of Lung Cancer fant deaths and disease. Au- • Respiratory Problems $908 million due to ear infections thors of the study say 911 in- • Ear Infections fants deaths could be saved if • Excessive crying or colic $592 million due to childhood obesity 90% of moms followed recom- • Cramps, Nausea, Diarrhea mendations to breastfeed ex- Remember, even if you can't quit smoking, $$601 million due to eczema breastfeeding still is best because the benefits clusively for 6 months. "We really shouldn't be blaming of breast milk still outweigh the risks from 2.6 billion due to 249 excess deaths nicotine. Seek help in quitting from your mothers…" says the authors. from necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) health care provider. Ask your doctor about Many hospitals offer formula nicotine replacement and other quit smoking to moms even when the moth- $1.8 billion due to 172 excess deaths therapies. Sources: www.Breastfeeding- ers intend to breastfeed, the Magazine.com, Smoking and Breastfeeding, La from lower respiratory tract infections authors say. Leache League
    • 4 Mocha Profile From Page 3 publicly breastfeed perhaps people will stop staring. When she returned back to work after a 6 week maternity leave; her supervisor allowed her to pump while at work dur- ing her breaks. She believes that pumping at work allowed her to continue providing breast milk to Ja’Karon. Alexis is a manager at a local McDonald. “When I come home from work the moment he sees me he waves his arms and gig- gles,” she says. “I love the bond we have.” AFRICAN AMERICAN BREASTFEEDING NETWORK Our VISION is to live in a world where breastfeeding is the norm within the African American community. Our MISSION is to promote breastfeeding as a natural and the best way to provide nourish- ment for babies and young children. To find out more about AABN and/or to get involved... CALL… (414) 264-3441 Pregnant and breastfeeding or EMAIL moms and their families AABN@YMAIL.COM attend the April 8th Sista2Sista Breastfeeding Chat Room Com- munity Gathering. This bi-monthly support group is a project of AABN. The purpose of this community event is to bring together MILK NOTES pregnant and breastfeeding mother and their families to dispel common myths, shares suggestions and to learn ways . The Chat Editor/Graphic Design: Dalvery Blackwell, Certified Breastfeeding Room takes place at the Children’s Health Service Society of Wis- Educator, Peer Counselor consin’s Family Resource Room, which is inside the Parklawn Proofreader: Beth Nelton, Project YMCA, 4340 North 40th Street. Upcoming dates are August 12 Nutritionist and October 14, 2110. Fathers, friends, family members and chil- dren are welcome. Free door prizes for everyone, dinner and Medical Advisor: Dinah Scott, RN, Certified Breastfeeding Educator childcare. For more information, please call (414) 264-3441.