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Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
Academic Integrity Overview
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Academic Integrity Overview

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  • 1. Academic Integrity
  • 2. What Is Academic Integrity ? Academic integrity means honesty and responsibility in scholarship. Academic assignments exist to help students learn; grades exist to show how fully this goal is attained. Therefore all work and all grades should result from the student’s own understanding and effort. (“What is academic,” n.d.)
  • 3. What Is Academic Integrity ?Hodges University adheres to theInternational Center for AcademicIntegrity’s definition of academicintegrity as the commitment to certaincore values: honesty, trust, fairness,respect, and responsibility.
  • 4. HonestyThe quest for truth and knowledgerequires intellectual and personalhonesty in learning, teaching, researchand service.
  • 5. TrustAcademic Institutions must foster aclimate of mutual trust in order tostimulate the free exchange of ideas.
  • 6. FairnessTreat students, faculty and staffaccording to HU standards andpolicies, administered in an impartialmanner.
  • 7. RespectFoster an environment that enableshonest and open communication, freefrom harassment and intimidation,where alternative points of view aretreated with consideration, and thediversity of our academic community isappreciated, and where the work ofothers is acknowledged through theproper identification of sources.
  • 8. ResponsibilityAll members of the universitycommunity are held accountable fortheir work and actions. Academicallydishonest behavior is not tolerated andis viewed as a breach of communityethical standards.
  • 9. What Does Academic Integrity Mean to Me?As a student, to have academic integritymeans that you have adopted principles orstandards that consistently govern how youpursue your school work. A student withacademic integrity earns a degree withhonest effort, and knows that this degree isa true accomplishment reflecting years ofhard work and genuine learning. Academicintegrity requires you to develop essentialskills including research, writing, anddocumenting.
  • 10. It is not always easy to know whatchoices to make in school. There aremany questions with answers that maybe unclear to you.
  • 11. Things you don’t want to do1. Plagiarism2. Cheating3. Fabrication4. Unauthorized collaboration5. Participating in academically dishonest activities6. Facilitating academic dishonesty
  • 12. Plagiarismany attempt to convey another’s workas one’s own original thought. It is theuse of another person’s ororganization’s words or conceptswithout giving the appropriate credit tothat person or organization.
  • 13. PlagiarismPlagiarism can be intentional orunintentional but regardless of theintent, the attempt is a breach ofacademic integrity. Students can avoidunintentional plagiarism by carefullyfollowing accepted scholarly practices.
  • 14. PlagiarismFor example, notes taken for papers andresearch projects should accurately recordsources of material to be cited,appropriately quoted, paraphrased orsummarized, and papers and researchprojects should acknowledge these sourcesin the appropriate places in the text of thepaper as well as in a references page at theend of the paper, in accordance withaccepted citation practices.
  • 15. PlagiarismThe following sources require citation:• Word-for-word quotation from a source• Paraphrasing others’ words and ideas• Audio, video, digital, or live exchanges of ideas, dialogue, or informationThe Hodges University Style Guide providesproper APA citation information. Additionalassistance can be found through AcademicAchievement Services, the Library, and onthe Library web page.
  • 16. PlagiarismFollowing the Hodges Style Guide willhelp students develop writing skillsthat demonstrate credibility byavoiding plagiarism and academicdishonesty. Following these guidelinesalso improves chances of earningbetter grades, saves time, and buildsan important set of skills for thefuture.
  • 17. PlagiarismFollowing the guide will help students:• Develop writing skills for courses and all writing.• Lessen formatting problems.• Increase credibility.• Avoid plagiarism and academic dishonesty.
  • 18. Cheatingintentionally using or attempting touse unauthorized materials,information, or study aids in anyacademic coursework.
  • 19. CheatingExamples of Cheating include, but arenot limited to:• Unauthorized use of notes, text, internet, or other aids during an examination• Copying from another student’s academic work• Unauthorized communication during an examination• Handing in the same paper for more than one course without explicit permission of the instructor• Intentionally viewing a test before it is administered• Storing notes in a portable electronic device for use during an examination
  • 20. Fabricationintentional falsification,misrepresentation, or invention of anyinformation, data, or citation in anacademic assignment.
  • 21. FabricationExamples of fabrication include, butare not limited to:• Inventing data or facts for an assignment• Altering the results of a lab experiment or survey• Citing a source in a references list that was not used
  • 22. Unauthorized collaborationwhen students submit individualacademic works that are substantiallysimilar to one another. While studentsmay use similar resources, theanalysis, interpretation, and reportingof the data must be each student’sindependent work.
  • 23. Unauthorized collaborationExamples of unauthorizedcollaboration include, but are notlimited to:• Working on a take-home examination or assignment with another student without express permission of the professor• Completing an academic assignment with the help of another student, and taking full credit
  • 24. Participating in academically dishonest activitiestaking an action with the intent ofgaining an unfair advantage.
  • 25. Participating in academically dishonest activitiesExamples of academically dishonestactivities include, but are not limitedto:• Misrepresenting oneself or one’s circumstances to a professor• Intentionally missing an examination or assignment deadline to gain an unfair advantage• Stealing an examination• Selling, loaning, or distributing materials for the purpose of cheating, plagiarism or any other academically dishonest acts• Purchasing a pre-written paper
  • 26. Facilitating academic dishonestyintentionally or knowingly helping toviolate any provision of this policy.
  • 27. Facilitating academic dishonestyExamples of facilitating academicdishonesty include, but are not limitedto:• Doing academic work for another student• Making available previously used academic work including examinations to another student to submit as his or her own
  • 28. SanctionsStudents found to have breachedacademic integrity will be subject toacademic and administrativesanctions.
  • 29. SanctionsAcademic sanctions are related to thegrade, academic standing and honors.Hodges University is committed toacademic integrity and seeks todevelop a student’s integrity throughcontinued academic development.
  • 30. SanctionsAdministrative sanctions are related tothe position of the students within theUniversity, such as leadership positionswithin student organizations, and willbe handled by the Dean of Students.
  • 31. SanctionsRepeat violations of the AcademicHonesty Policy will not be tolerated.Sanctions are imposed to reflect theimpact of academic dishonesty on theuniversity as a whole. – For more on sanctions, see the Academic Honesty Policy.
  • 32. Tips for making research a little less painfulWhen researching:1. know what youre looking at2. email good citations and articles to yourself as you find them3. keep track of what youve done and what worked4. take good notes5. keep things in one place6. print out web pages that you plan to use as sources for your assignment (UCLA Library, n.d.)
  • 33. Quick tips for your plan and your time• Estimate how much time you think it will take to do your assignment and double it. This may sound overkill, but padding your time could help you deal with obstacles like writer’s block, a dying printer, or other types of issues. Besides, if you finish early you can concentrate on going out and having a good time while the rest of your classmates are stressing.
  • 34. Quick tips for your plan and your time• Break your assignment down into small parts and set mini-deadlines for yourself leading to the instructors deadline. Getting all the little pieces done will help you complete the final version on time and help you avoid stressing out as the instructors deadline approaches. This might sound kinda dorky, but itll work. Check out UCLA’s The Assignment Calculator which does just that!
  • 35. Quick tips for your plan and your time• Look over all your syllabi at the beginning of the quarter and stick due dates for assignments in your calendar or mobile device. Dont let deadlines surprise you.• Attend a time management workshop or other workshop for more tips and practical ideas. – Workshops at Hodges (UCLA Library, n.d.)
  • 36. Quick tips for keeping things on trackThink about how your assignment is goingso you can adjust your plan before its toolate.Ask yourself:• Do I really understand the assignment? If you have any question at all about whether or not you understand the assignment, talk to your professor or T.A. as soon as you can. Avoid wasting a lot of time going in the wrong direction.
  • 37. Quick tips for keeping things on track• Am I spending too much time researching? Remember that you still have to get the assignment done. Dont leave analyzing the information and writing the paper or constructing the project until the last minute. Besides, part of being a good researcher is knowing when youve found enough—know when to move on.
  • 38. Quick tips for keeping things on track• Am I completely lost and cant find any information? Its easy to get lost or feel overwhelmed when theres access to so much information. Sometimes the library can seem like a chaotic labyrinth, but its probably one of the most organized places that youll ever come across, which makes it easy to find stuff—really, its true.
  • 39. Quick tips for keeping things on track• Am I completely lost and cant find any information? Becoming familiar with how information is organized in the library and on the library web site will save you time and frustration. A few ways that you can get help with library research is by speaking with a librarian at the reference desk, by making an individual research appointment or by chatting with a librarian online.
  • 40. Here are some things that you should consult your professors about• Turning in an assignment completed for a different class• Authorized and unauthorized "group work"• Not understanding the assignment or content, having problems getting started, and other resolvable roadblocks• Remember to read the policies and ask your professors or the Dean if you have questions. Theyre here to help you, and would much rather answer your questions early on than find you in trouble later. (UCLA Library, n.d.).
  • 41. Quick tips for keeping things on track• Is my paper or project starting to come together? As you get closer to your deadlines, are things starting to gel? If not, find someone to bounce ideas around with like a classmate, a friend, a family member, a tutor, a T.A., a professor… (UCLA Library, n.d.)
  • 42. Tutorial Design & DevelopmentThis tutorial is based on the AcademicIntegrity tutorial developed by theUniversity of Alaska Anchorage and BruinSuccess with Less Stress from the UCLALibrary. They graciously provided HodgesUniversity with permission to use theirdesign concept and content for the basis ofthis tutorial.
  • 43. ReferencesUCLA Library. (n.d.). Bruin success with less stress. Retrieved from http://unitproj.library.ucla.edu/col/bruinsuccess/University of Oklahoma. (n.d.). What is academic integrity? Retrieved from http://integrity.ou.edu/index.html

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