• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Report
 

Report

on

  • 238 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
238
Views on SlideShare
238
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via SlideShare as Microsoft Word

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Report Report Document Transcript

    • Gabrielle Pratten EML 309 – Assignment 1 Gabrielle Pratten (Part A)Table of ContentsIntroduction..............................................................................................................p. 2New Technologies and the Differences between Education in the 20th Century and the21st Century..............................................................................................................p.2Key Terms and Concepts for Learning Literacy......................................................p.3Multiliteracies and Text Construction.....................................................................p.4The Purpose, Structure and Language Features of Factual and Fictional TextTypes.......................................................................................................................p.5Analysis of Different Texts.....................................................................................p.6Short Video about Literacy and Learning...............................................................p.6Conclusion...............................................................................................................p.7Resources................................................................................................................p.8 1
    • Gabrielle PrattenIntroductionThe purpose of this report is to discuss important elements of literacy teaching andtext construction. I have completed six portfolio tasks which demonstrate myknowledge of topics such ICTs in the 21st century classroom, teaching frameworkssuch as the Four Resources Model and multiliteracies pedagogy. The report reflectsupon different text types and the structure, language and visual elements differenttexts used and my views on literacy learning. It is vital that educators acknowledgethat ‘literacy teaching can equip students for the changing world in which they live’(Ansley & Bull, 2006) and this report will illustrate reasons why.New Technologies and the Differences between Education in the 20th Centuryand the 21st CenturyPortfolio task 1.1 explores the use of Information and Communication Technologies(ICTs) in education and how technologies have not radically influenced teaching andlearning, as first expected. I included this task as a key asset to deepen myunderstanding of how to use ICTs in the classroom to prepare learners for the futureand to identify differences between the 20th Century (Industrial Age) and 21st Century(Knowledge Age) education systems.This artefact has broadened my learning of education systems and the importance ofincorporating ICTs into Knowledge Age education, to ensure ‘…learning is a process,not a ‘thing’’ (Gilbert, 2007). Gilbert (2007) identifies that many teachers whoinclude ICT use in their teaching practices is often little more than ‘busy work’ andoften reflects the elements of an Industrial Age education system, which indicates tome the importance of using ICTs effectively, to present the tools and assets needed for‘real’ research to generate new knowledge and multi modal literacy.After I completed the table on the differences of Industrial Age and Knowledge Ageeducation systems, it became evident that I need to further develop my skills andabilities for a Knowledge Age school, as the ‘one-size fits all’ approach of theIndustrial Age model does not cater for equal opportunity. Considering the rapid rate 2
    • Gabrielle Prattenat which ICTs are becoming a key element of home, work and school contexts, I canacknowledge the great ‘need to move beyond Industrial Age ways of thinking abouteducation’ (Gilbert, 2007). Leu (2004) states that the appearance of the Internet ‘…isone of the most powerful social revolutions taking place today’ (Leu et al: 2004). Thisstatement encourages my motivation to become a knowledgeable ICT user and tocreate ‘life-long learning’ in a Knowledge Age education system.Professional Teaching Standard reached: Element 1 – Know their subject/contentand how to teach that content to their students.Key Terms and Concepts for Learning LiteracyI included Portfolio task 1.2 as it identifies key terms and concepts that I need to havedeep understanding of to become an effective and diverse teacher. To further explaineach concept in my own words I explored the subject text Write Ways by Wing Jan(2009) and reading 1.2. It is important that educators can identify and implementteaching methods and requirements to successfully teach literacy in the classroom.‘Literacy practices are shaped by culture, society and situation’ (Wing Jan, 2009),which illustrates the importance of establishing a solid base and knowledge of keyterms, such as Constructivism, Scaffolding and ZPD (zone of proximal development).This portfolio activity has reiterated the significance of acknowledging the diversityof backgrounds and literacy experiences students bring into the classroom. A teacherneeds to be able to identify a child’s sociocultural context to develop school literacyexperiences that reflect significant experiences for children. This teaching methodincludes Habitus and Funds of Knowledge by which a child’s home, community andschool experiences shape their literacy identity, ‘which allows students to share andtalk about their experiences, thereby providing foundations for new learning in theirclassrooms (Harris et al, 2007).From learning further about the key concepts involved in literacy, I have gained moreunderstanding of methods and processes that are needed to teach literacy education,particularly by delving further into the reading on Constructivism. Jones (2002) states 3
    • Gabrielle Prattenthat, ‘constructivism’s greatest contribution to education may be through the shift inemphasis from knowledge as a product to knowing as a process’, I find thisstatements and the constructivist approach to education extremely valuable. I willportray constructivism in my teaching pedagogy to ensure that teaching and learningis an ‘active’ development, which is imperative for success in the globalised world welive in.Professional Teaching Standard reached: Element 2- Know their students and howthey learn.Multiliteracies and Text ConstructionPortfolio 1.3 is included in my assets due to the significance of multiliteracies for thevaried contexts of a 21st century life, and to develop my own understanding ofmultiliteracies pedagogy. This activity also explored the fundamentals of textconstruction which is vital for my personal growth writing and using visual resourcesas a teacher of literacy. Anstey (2006) states that ‘teachers will need to help studentsdevelop the capacity to produce, read, and interpret spoken language, print andmultimedia texts’, to give them the knowledge required to respond to a socially,culturally and technologically diverse world.Another aspect of portfolio 1.3 that is significant to all text construction is the fivesemiotic systems: linguistic, visual, auditory, gestural and spatial. The semioticsystems not only allow the text user or reader to gain deeper understanding andmeaning, it provides ‘a more precise and relevant understanding of literacy works’(Culler, 2001), which is a vital skill to encompass, considering the large number ofmultimodal texts being used today. The Four Resources Model of literacy ‘describesthe sets of resources of literacy practices that literate people draw on and use’ (WingJan, 2009). Text encoder/decoder, text participant, text user and text analyst areinterdependent skills that enable individuals to effectively participate in a variety ofsocial and cultural practices. As a teacher, the semiotic systems and the FourResources Model will become a major element to every-day literacy practices 4
    • Gabrielle Prattenexperienced in the classroom, to ensure I can scaffold each student to become amultiliterate person and to continue my own learning as a text user.Professional Teaching Standard reached: Element 6 –Continually improve theirprofessional knowledge and practice.The Purpose, Structure and Language Features of Factual and Fictional TextTypesIt is important that teachers can determine the purpose, structure and languagefeatures of factual and fictional texts so that they can implement appropriate text typesand teaching strategies in the classroom. After completing portfolio task 2.2, I realisedthe significant difference between factual and fictional text types and how limited myunderstanding was of each. Wing Jan (2009) identifies the reason for the structure,language use and visual features of text types such as procedures, explanations,information reports, persuasive texts and recounts. I feel that from completing thisportfolio task I have become more competent in text construction and believe that Ihave the skills required to teach children about text types and their unique purposes.Winch et al (2011) states that most texts in the modern world combine both languageand images to construct meaning, which illustrates the significance of being amultiliterate text user. This statement supports portfolio task 2.2 as visual elementssuch as maps, tables and graphs complement information narratives, where as creativeillustrations or drawings support fictional narratives. It is important that children areexposed to a variety of texts through methods such as shared, guided and independentlearning (Winch et al, 2011). This task has broadened my understanding of structure,language, and visual features different texts portray and the similarities anddifferences of fictional and factual texts.Professional Teaching Standard reached: Element 4- Teachers communicateeffectively with their students. 5
    • Gabrielle PrattenAnalysis of Different TextsPortfolio task 2.3 is included in my assets to demonstrate the elements of factual andfictional text types that create meaning and purpose to a variety of audiences. I feelthis to be a valuable activity and one that I would use in the classroom so studentscould critically analyse different text types and gain a valuable understanding of thestructure, language and visual features text types expose. A procedural text is a factualtext, Winch et al (2011) states that recipes, rules of games, and directions that tell youhow to get from place to place are all procedures. I enjoyed analysing the cupcakerecipe as I love to cook and I feel that this reiterates the importance of implementingyour students’ interests into every-day lessons.This portfolio task has continued my development and knowledge of text constructionand an awareness of the relationship between the structure, language, and visualfeatures texts use to build the students’ awareness of different text types and theirpurposes. NZ Ministry of Education (2003) states that by making links with thestudents’ reading, teachers can elicit or explain the reasons why, for example, lists,reports and letters are presented differently. Wing Jan (2009) suggests valuableteaching strategies that I will definitely implement in the classroom, for example,procedures that generate ideas (brainstorming, concept maps etc), guiding questions,planning scaffolds and personal topics. Teachers need to continually develop theirown learning, to provide students with the best chance of success with textconstruction.Professional Teaching Standard reached: Element 2- Know their students and howthey learn.Short Video about Literacy and LearningPortfolio task 2.4 involved creating a short film using the program photo story. Iincluded this task as part of my assets as I am not particularly confident orknowledgeable with multi-media texts and I felt that this activity would assist in 6
    • Gabrielle Prattendeveloping my skills. Wing Jan (2009) reports that multi-media texts are ‘createdusing all or a combination of the following design elements: visual, audio, spatial andlinguistic’. I feel it is vital that I continue developing my competency with tasks suchas portfolio 2.4 to ensure that I can provide students with appropriate examples andguidance when teaching them how to convey meaning in multi-media texts.Through participation in multimedia activities students can learn real world skillsrelated to technology, the challenges of communicating to different audiences andhow to present information in compelling ways. Hoffman & Schallert (2004) statethat ‘when documents contain a large amount of spatial and visual information, thedynamic presentation of visual images may help children to imagine complexinformation’ (p. 145). This opinion indicates the significance of encouraging studentsto acknowledge the relationships between the purpose, structure, language and visualfeatures of different text types to ensure meaning is portrayed.Professional Teaching Standard reached: Element 6 –Continually improve theirprofessional knowledge and practice.ConclusionEvidently, there are many complex elements involved in teaching and learningliteracy. Having completed six portfolio tasks, I feel that I have gained deeperunderstanding of the importance to create exciting and relevant lessons that involve avariety of teaching methods and text types. Teachers need to continually develop theirknowledge to ensure that they can support and strengthen students’ in every aspect.‘Building up knowledge of theory helps us as teachers to perceive more aboutliterature and therefore enriches our teaching’ (Winch et al, 2011), which is what Ibelieve this assignment has done. 7
    • Gabrielle PrattenResourcesAnstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Defining multiliteracies. In Teaching and Learningmultiliteracies: Changing times, changing literacies (chap.2, pp.19-55). Carlton,South VIC: Curriculum Corporation.Culler, J. (2001). The pursuit of language: semiotics, literature, deconstruction.London: First published in Routledge Classics 2001 by Routledge.Gilbert, J. (2007). Knowledge, the disciplines, and learning in the Digital Age.Educational Research Policy and Practice, 6 (2), 115-112. New Zealand.Harris, P., McKenzie, B., Fitzsimmons, P., & Turbill, J. (2007). A social model ofwriting. In Writing in the primary school years (chap. 3, pp. 38-6). South Melbourne,VIC: Thomson Social Science Press.Hoffman, J., & Schallert, D. (2004). The texts in elementary classrooms. New Jersey,America: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Publishers.Jones, M. G., & Brader-Arage, L. (2002). The impact of constructivism on education:Language, Discourse and Meaning, American Communication Journal, Volume 5,Issue 3.Leu, D.J., Jr., Kinzer, C.K., Coiro, J., & Cammack, D.W. (2004). Toward a theory ofnew literacies emerging from the internet and other information and communicationtechnologies. In R.B. Ruddell, & N. Unrau (Eds.), Theoretical models and processesof reading (5th ed., pp. 1570-1613).NSW Professional Teaching Standards. (2010). NSW Institute of Teachers.NZ Ministery of Education. (2003). Approaches to writing. In Effective literacypractice in years 1 to 4 (chap. 4, pp. 102-109). Wellington, NZ: Learning Media.Wing Jan, L. (2009). Write ways. Modelling Writing Forms. Third Edition. SouthMelbourne, Australia: Published by Oxford University Press.Winch et al. (2011). Literacy: reading, writing and children’s literature. Melbourne,Australia: Oxford University Press. 8