Low Impact Landscaping
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Low Impact Landscaping

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The objective of this seminar is to introduce concepts of resource-conserving and environmentally-friendly landscape design and maintenance practices. Conventional residential landscapes are often ...

The objective of this seminar is to introduce concepts of resource-conserving and environmentally-friendly landscape design and maintenance practices. Conventional residential landscapes are often resource-intensive, and some of the maintenance products and practices typically employed have been associated with adverse long-term health consequences and environmental impact. Topics covered will include low-water landscaping or xeriscaping, rainwater collection and use, advantages of using native plants, more-effective storm water management, and organic turf and landscape management practices. The seminar will include a brief discussion of Low Impact Development, green roofs, and "hardscaping" options.

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Low Impact Landscaping Low Impact Landscaping Presentation Transcript

  • The Green Roundtable and Low-impact Landscaping paul@greenroundtable.org www.nexusboston.com
  • Green Roundtable Consulting, education, training and strategic planning to create healthy environments by integrating principles of sustainability into mainstream planning, design and construction. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Some key questions: • Why are we using potable water for landscape irrigation? • Are we complicit in some of the major flooding events that have taken place recently? • Why are we getting sick in and around our own homes? Are the places we live becoming more dangerous than the places we work? • Can landscape design choices play a role in affecting climate change? • Are we to believe that our „magic bullet‟ approaches are always more effective than systems that nature has had millions of years to work out? The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Some sobering facts… Water tables are now falling in countries that contain over half the world‟s people 4 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Some sobering facts… There are currently 1,243 EPA Superfund sites on the National Priorities List and 60 more proposed (as of 3/20/07) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Some sobering facts… The incidence of asthma has increased dramatically over the last 25 years in the U.S. and other industrialized nations. 6 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Some sobering facts… Cancer clusters have been identified in some more-affluent communities and have been attributed to chemically-intensive landscape management practices 7 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Objectives Discuss: - More environmentally benign landscape management practices - Ways that landscape design choices can influence climate change mitigation strategies - Ways that landscape design can minimize the potential for local flooding - How landscape design can help to reduce pollution in local waterways and preserve/ protect water supplies - How effective landscape design can enhance or create wildlife habitat - Ways to minimize site disturbance during construction The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The single best thing you can do: LOSE THE LAWN!!! The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The trouble with turf Lawn maintenance routines create multiple threats to the environment through: • Heavy fertilizer requirements • Pesticide and herbicide use • Need to mow regularly and the resources that this requires (gas, electricity, oil, etc) • Water use They are energy and resource intensive. If possible, LOSE THE LAWN! The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Alternatives to lawns • Let it grow wild! • Flower beds • Vegetable gardens • Rock gardens • Wildflower gardens/ meadows • Hedgerow • Water features • Mulch beds • Artificial turf? The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Artificial turf? The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Permaculture • Incorporating edible plants into landscape • Alternative to resource-intensive store-bought foods • Emphasis on perennial plants like fruit trees and shrubs and perennial herbs/ greens • See Permaculture Guild: http://northeasternpermaculture.wikispaces.com/Massachusetts • http://www.hort.uconn.edu/Plants/ (plant database) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Lawn care (if you must) Follow good general turf management practices: • Don‟t cut too short • Aerate and de-thatch if necessary • Water deeply only once a week (~ 1” of water); this promotes deep root development • Use rain sensors on irrigation systems!!! • Use a drought-tolerant seed variety suitable for this region • Employ organic fertilizing and pest management practices The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Lawn care (cont.) • Chemical pesticides/ herbicides may kill earthworms, contributing to thatch build-up • Avoid adding too much nitrogen as it can accelerate growth and lead to thatch build-up • Lots of clover may signal nitrogen deficiency • Maintain good pH balance (typically w/ limestone) • Fertilize only if necessary! Get soil tested by local agricultural extension service; see: http://www.umass.edu/plsoils/soiltest/ The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Lawn equipment • Use a reel-type push mower • 2nd best: electric mower • Make sure lawnmower blades are sharp • Keep equipment well maintained • Avoid use of leaf blowers The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Low-impact turf management • Learn to live with a less-than-perfect lawn! • Leave clippings on lawn to return nutrients; mulch leaves in place (but pay attention to nitrogen balance) • Top-dress lawn with compost • Fertilize with a home-brew fertilizer in a hose-end sprayer (see next slide & Jerry Baker resources) • Use a natural fertilizer if necessary; ex. alfalfa meal; use suitable Nitrogen-Phosphorus-Potassium (N-P-K) balance The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Lawn „tonic‟ •1 cup Epsom salts •1 cup liquid dish soap •1 cup Listerine mouthwash •1 cup household ammonia (can be lemon variety) •1 can of beer This is a slight modification of a Jerry Baker (The Impatient Gardener) recipe. Apply with hose-end sprayer after mowing, dethatching and seeding; treats around 2500 sq. ft. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Low-impact turf management • Dense, healthy turf discourages weed growth • Tolerate a few weeds! • Hand-pull weeds • Control tough weeds with spot application of a „home-brew‟ solution • Apply corn gluten meal (CGM) as a pre-emergent weed control and fertilizer • See www.organiclandcare.net The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Corn-gluten meal • Natural pre-emergent weed and crabgrass killer • Provides slow-release nitrogen to lawn • Apply when: - Forsythias in bloom - Soil temperature is ~60 deg. F. • Generally applied in late April in northeast • It really works and it‟s available locally! The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Green Practice: Non-Toxic Weed & Pest Control The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The downside to chemicals • May be toxic to humans • Can adversely affect soil structure • May kill desirable natural organisms • Fossil fuel-intensive in their manufacture • High persistence in environment • Environmental justice issues The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Natural weed control strategies • Mulches • Mechanical control: - Hand pulling! - Repeated cutting/ scraping of above-ground parts may eventually kill root system • Destroy weed seeds by heating soil (w/ black plastic sheeting) • Avoiding excessive tilling • Natural chemical control The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Typical mulching materials • Grass clippings and leaf litter (cut up if possible) • Bark/ wood chips (watch nitrogen balance) • Plastic sheeting/ landscape fabric • Stone/ marble chips • Recycled rubber materials • Newspaper • Straw The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Natural insect control strategies • Mulches • Mechanical control: - Hand picking! - Blasting w/ jet of water from spray bottle • Companion planting • Sacrificial plantings • Traps- Hanging pheromonal traps, sticky traps • Biological control • Chemical control- use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies if you must use conventional pesticides The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Natural „chemical‟ controls • Insecticidal soap • Dormant oils • Diatomaceous earth The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Natural/ Biological pest control Three major categories: • Plant extracts • Insect predators • Pathogens The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Plant extracts • Neem sprays • Hot pepper sprays Neem tree • Natural pyrethrum spray Chrysanthemums The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Insect controls • Lady bugs; soil nematodes; trichogramma wasps; common green lacewing • Many are effective against a variety of insects- aphids, thrips, mites, moths, beetles, whiteflies, etc. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Natural pathogens • Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt; trade names Dipel and Thuricide)- Effective against gypsy moths, tent caterpillar, tobacco hornworm, corn borer; variant used in mosquito control • Bacillus popilliae (Bp; milky spore)- Effective against Japanese beetle grubs The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Japanese beetle grubs & adult beetle The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Chemicals in landscape maint. Reducing the risks The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • General ways to address the risks • First ask: Is this maintenance routine really necessary? Can I live with the weeds/ pests, etc? • Eliminate or avoid systems / features that require significant use of resources to maintain (e.g. lawns, swimming pools, expansive asphalt driveways) • Assess the risks of using commercial products. Learn what the chemical nasties are, know which are in the products you use, and think twice about using them The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Minimizing the risks • Employ Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies • Use conventional chemical products as a last resort • Use sparingly/ judiciously • Use safer alternatives found around the house (the home „formulary‟) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Minimizing the risks, cont. • Provide adequate ventilation/ use respiratory protection where appropriate • Mark treated areas/ Keep children & animals away • Store chemicals away from living spaces • Understand risks associated with disposal, and take adequate precautions The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The „Nasties‟ Some common chemical ingredients in home & garden products: • 2,4-D • Ammonia • Arsenic • Benzene • Chlorine • Formaldehyde • Hydrocarbons • Ketones, including acetone • Methylene chloride The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Nasties, continued • Mineral spirits; petroleum distillates • Naphthalene & paradichlorobenzene • Nitrobenzene • Perchloroethylene • Phenol and cresol • Pthalates • PVC • Toluene • Trichloroethylene The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Using „conventional‟ products • Always read the label and follow directions • Be mindful of “Caution” vs. “Warning” vs. “Danger” • Know what‟s in them; do the research • Don‟t buy more than you need. Avoid mega-sized refill bottles just because they seem to be a good value. • Try using in smaller quantities or more diluted • If VOC‟s or other gases emitted, ventilate area well • Dispose of properly The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Assessing the risks • Check for ingredients on label • Check “SIRI” database for Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) at http://siri.uvm.edu/index.html • Check for known dangers/ toxicity at NIH Household Products Database (http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/index.htm) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Assessing the risks • Check NIH Toxnet Database (http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/) • Contact manufacturer The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
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  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Home Formulary The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Kitchen chemistry: typical ingredients • Dish soap • Rubbing alcohol • Beer • Ammonia • Epsom salts • Table sugar • Cayenne pepper • Aromatic oils, like clove oil The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Pesticides/ herbicides Use 1 or 2 teaspoons of dishwashing liquid to a pint of water in a spray bottle to kill many house and garden plant pests, including aphids and scale; or use commercial variety insecticidal soap like Safer‟s The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Spot herbicide for lawn • 9 oz straight white vinegar • 2 oz lemon juice • 2 tbs table salt • 1 tsp liquid dish soap • Combine in spray bottle • Only kills above-ground parts of dandelions, etc, • May eradicate weeds with repeated application • Usually doesn‟t affect surrounding turf grass • Works best in full sun The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Insect repellant for garden • 1 cup boiling hot water • 2 tbs cayenne pepper • 2 cloves minced or crushed garlic • 1 tsp liquid dish soap • Pour hot water over pepper and garlic. Steep overnight • Strain & add dish soap and another cup of water. • Use in a spray bottle on vegetables & flowers; soak all foliage; re-apply after rain • Keeps several types of insects at bay. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • For more recipes: The Impatient Gardener, Jerry Baker, Ballantine Books, 1983 The Impatient Gardener‟s Lawn Book, Jerry Baker, Ballantine Books, 1987 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • De-icers • Favor mechanical „traction control‟; Use sand, kitty litter or sawdust, or some combination of these • Always „cut‟ de-icers, especially rock salt, with sand; a little rock salt goes a long way • Don‟t use indiscriminately; apply only where needed! • Potassium Chloride (KCl), Magnesium Chloride(MgCl), Calcium Chloride (CaCl) and Urea can be more benign alternatives to rock salt- these can sometimes provide needed nutrients to soil if they end up on lawns, etc. (KCL & Urea can burn lawns; some de-icers stain carpeting & flooring) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • De-icers, continued • Along w/ providing traction, sand has ice-melting properties as it absorbs heat from the sun • Try to sweep up sand/ salt after walkways/ driveways are dry as it can clog storm drains; re-use it if practical • Store de-icers indoors at room temperature to increase effectiveness and minimize quantity needed • Clear snow & ice barriers that prevent drainage of paving & contribute to „refreeze‟ ice patches The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Green Practice: Stormwater management & water conservation in the landscape The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Water conservation strategies • Use grey water systems • Collect rainwater • Employ xeriscaping principles The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Xeriscaping (low-water-landscaping) • Two major aspects: -Making maximum use of available precipitation -Selecting species with low water requirements • Use mulches • Maintain high level of organic matter in soil • Create water retention landscape features The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Xeriscaping (low-water-landscaping) • Use drip irrigation & soaker hoses; moisture sensors • Group plants • Use plantings to create windbreaks & shade to protect from drying winds and sun • Use native plantings, they are better suited to natural rainfall patterns The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Soaker Hose The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Low-water trees: Common name Botanical Name Height Amur Maple Acer ginnala 20'-25' Austrian Pine Pinus nigra 50' Japanese Black Pine Pinus thunbergii 6-10' Cornelian Cherry Cornus Mas 20-25' London Plane Platanus x acerifolia 50' White Oak Quercus alba 50' The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Low-water shrubs: Common name Botanical Name Height Broom Cytisus scoparius 5-6' Flowering Quince Chaenomeles specoisa 6'-10' Junipers Juniperus sp. 2'-9' Cinquefoil Potentilla 3'-4' Butterfly Bush Buddleia davidii 6-10' Rose-of-Sharon Hibiscus syriacus Diana 6-8' Winterberry Ilex verticillata 8-10' Mugo Pine(dwarf) Pinus mugo 3-4' The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Low-water groundcovers: Common name Botanical Name Height Bearberry Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 6-8" Creeping Lilly-turf Liriope spicata 6-8" Violets Viola sp.. 6-8" Snow-in-Summer Cerastium tomentosum 6-8" The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Low-water perennials: Common name Botanical Name Height New England Aster Aster Novae-angliae 15- 30" CommonBlanketflower Gaillardia aristata 24-36" Moonbeam Coreopsis verticillata 24-36" Purple Coneflower Echinacea purpurea 24- 36" The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Also consider: • Sedum • Yarrow • Coreopsis • Sage • Thyme • Perennials available at most home centers and garden stores The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Rainwater collection • For 1000 sq ft roof area, 15 – 25,000 gallons of rainwater can be collected annually in Eastern states • Combined with drip-irrigation systems, collected rainwater can keep landscaping vibrant even during drought conditions • Using rainwater helps to maintain aquifers and public water supplies at adequate levels • Rainwater does not contain chlorine so it is better for plants, garden ponds, etc. • Rainwater is free, and inexpensive to collect & store! The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • See www.conservationtechnology.com & http://www.wattsradiant.com/rainwater/?t=professional%20rainwater The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • http://www.cleanairgardening.com/33galrainbar.html The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Water conservation resources •http://www.mwra.com/comsupport/conservation/ gardeningtips.htm • www.waterwiser.org • www.irrigation.org • www.epa.gov/watersense • See also: Reliable Rain- A Practical Guide to Landscape Irrigation, Howard Hendrix & Stuart Straw, Taunton Press, 1998 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Raingardens The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Low-impact landscape The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Green Sites: Minimizing light pollution The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Source: International Dark Sky Association The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • “BAD” FIXTURES Flood Light Cobra Head If used as in the picture. The most used 30-50% light goes design upward for street lights (If pointed down- Unchanged since Zero light loss.) photo © BGE 1960s Decorative ~30% upward ~70% photo © BGE upward photo © BGE Source: Baltimore Gas & Electric The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Residential accent lights can be some of worst offenders; they can be energy wasters too The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • “GOOD” FIXTURES Box Design. Can have round, cylindrical or other shape head. Receded bulb Decorative Flat lens 100% downward Only ~5% upward photo © BGE Source: Baltimore Gas & Electric The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Resources For a examination of some of the issues, and and an example of zoning restrictions on outdoor lighting see: http://www.ci.neptune-beach.fl.us/2007agenda/ 4_16_07/2007-XXProposedLightingOrdinance.pdf For some outdoor lighting design tips see: http://www.skyandtelescope.com/resources/ darksky/3307541.html?showAll=y&c=y The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Green Practice: Sustainable site design The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Keys to Sustainable Sites • Stormwater management is paramount (LID- Low- Impact Development) • Use light-colored paving to minimize heat-island effect • Landscape for energy conservation- use vegetation for wind barriers, shading, etc. • Employ zero net water use strategies and general water conservation/ xeriscaping practices • Maintain ‟wild‟ spaces on property if possible • Minimize light pollution • Protect site during construction activities The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Stormwater management Effective stormwater management can: • Assure effective groundwater recharge • Minimize flooding potential • Reduce contamination of oceans, lakes, rivers • Promote lush, green landscapes • Provide secondary benefit of reducing urban heat island effect The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Stormwater Mgmt: Strategies • Slow water down/ retain on site • Increase permeability of ground surfaces • Minimize soil compaction • Use collected water for landscape irrigation The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Slowing down/ retaining stormwater Retention Pond Bioswale/ Raingarden Vegetated Buffer The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Cistern Drywell The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Permeable surface options • Brick/ masonry pavers • Gravel • Stabilized soil/ stone dust • Recycle rubber paver mats/ bricks • Plastic driveway mats The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Permeable surface options The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Permeable surface options The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Permeable surface options Gravel driveways & walkways: Simple, low-cost, effective! The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Permeable surface options The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Permeable surface options „Drivable grass‟ The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Permeable surface options See www.rubbersidewalks.com The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Permeable surface options The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Some sources of supply Permeable paving/ surfaces: • http://www.ecosurfaces.com/ecomax/rubbertiles.htm • http://www.reifenrubber.com/ • http://www.gerbertltd.com/rubber_flooring/ecopave/index.htm • http://www.abacussurfaces.com/Paver%20Rubber.htm • http://www.soilretention.com/drivablegrass.html • http://www.rubberform.com • http://www.hanoverpavers.com • http://www.paversearch.com/sidewalk-pavers-rubber.htm The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Green roofs • Can provide stormwater management • Reduce urban heat islands • Help to minimize global warming by conserving energy • May extend the life of your roof • Provide green space & wildlife habitat • Improve acoustic comfort The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Modular green roof system See: http://www.liveroof.net/ & http://www.westonsolutions.com/pdf_docs/B-D066- GreenGrid.pdf The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Green roofs • Properly designed, can pay for themselves in 10 – 15 years via reduced energy cost • Especially effective in reducing cooling costs • By some estimates, can reduce cooling costs by up to 30% in single-story structures • See www.greenroofs.com (industry ass‟n) & www.conservationtechnology.com (supplier example) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Stormwater mgmt resources • http://www.unh.edu/erg/cstev/ • http://www.mapc.org (email lid@mapc.org) • http://nemo.uconn.edu/tools/publications/tech_papers/tech_paper_8.p df • http://www.georgiastormwater.com/ • http://www.georgiastormwater.com/vol2/3-3-8.pdf • http://extension.missouri.edu/xplor/envqual/eqm102f.htm • http://www.lid-stormwater.net/background.htm • http://cfpub.epa.gov/npdes/docs.cfm?program_id=6&view=allprog&sort =name#retrofit_manual The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Organic landcare resources: • www.beyondpesticides.org • www.planetnatural.com • http://cipm.ncsu.edu/ent/biocontrol/ • http://www.anbp.org/ • http://www.ipmcenters.org/index.cfm • http://www.pk.uni-bonn.de/ppigb/ppigb.htm • http://www.organiclandcare.net • http://www.hort.uconn.edu/Plants/ (plant database) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Gardener's Supply Company. 128 Intervale Road Burlington, VT 05401 Telephone: 802/863-1700; FAX: 802/660-4600 Their "Grubguard" is a mixture of H. bacteriophora and S. feltiae Retail and wholesale. Mail order catalog. Free catalog and consultation. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Green Spot, Ltd. 93 Priest Road Nottingham, NH 03290-6204 Telephone: 603/942-8925; FAX 603/942-8932 e-mail: Info@GreenMethods.com H. bacteriophora, S. carpocapsae Free catalog and telephone consultation. Green Methods Manual. Biological pest control agents and integrated pest management [IPM] products. Contact Mike Cherim, director. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • PM Laboratories, Inc. Main Street Locke, NY 13092-0300 Telephone: 315/497-2063; FAX: 315/497-3129 S. carpocapsae, S. feltiae, H. bacteriophora Retail and wholesale. Free catalog The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Suggested reading: Food Not Lawns: How to Turn Your Yard into a Garden..., Heather C. Flores, 2006.* Gaia’s Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture, Toby Hemenway, 2000. Gardener to Gardener Almanac & Pest Control Primer, Vicki Mattern, Fern Marshall Bradley, ed., 2000. Green Living, A Practical Guide to Eating, Gardening, Energy Saving, and Housekeeping for a Healthy Planet, Sarah Books Callard, Diane Carlton Millis, 2002.* Guide To Healthy Landscapes, Volume 1: From The Ground Up Site And Soil Preparation. M.L. Altobelli,Ann MCGovern, 2003.* Jerry Baker's Bug Off!: 2,193 Super Secrets for Battling Bad Bugs, Outfoxing Crafty Critters, Evicting Voracious Varmints and Much More!, Baker, Jerry, 2005. Water Efficient Landscaping, Preventing Pollution & Using Resources Wisely, Environmental Protection Agency, 2002.* * = Titles in the NEXUS Library The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Additional reading: • Sustainable Landscape Construction, J. William Thompson and Kim Sorvig, Island Press, 2000 • Natural Landscaping, Sally Roth, Rodale Press, 1997 • Rodale‟s Landscape Problem Solver, Jeff and Liz Ball, Rodale Press, 1989 •The Organic Gardener‟s Handbook of Natural Insect and Disease Control, Barbara Ellis & Fern Marshall Bradley, ed., Rodale Press, 1996 • Natural Enemies Handbook- The Illustrated Guide to Biological Pest Control, University of California Press, 1998 • Take Two Plants: The Gardener‟s Complete Guide to Companion Planting, Nicola Ferguson, Contemporary Books, 1999 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Use NEXUS as your green resource! • Upcoming workshops • Reference library • Samples library • Cyber Lounge • Online resources at nexusboston.com • Local green building community The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Local Resources The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • THANK YOU www.greenroundtable.org info@greenroundtable.org 617-374-3740 The Green Roundtable, Inc. (GRT) is an independent non-profit organization whose mission is to mainstream green building and sustainable design and become obsolete. We work toward this goal by promoting and supporting healthy and environmentally integrated building projects through strategic outreach, education, policy advocacy and technical assistance. Located in downtown Boston, NEXUS welcomes all to come ask questions, research topics, and attend tours and www.nexusboston.com events on green building and 38 Chauncy Street, Boston sustainable design innovation. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)