LEED & Green Materials
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LEED & Green Materials

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Need to get an understanding of what really makes a product green? What are the criteria? What is Life Cycle Assessment? How do you understand the environmental footprint of a product? What are the ...

Need to get an understanding of what really makes a product green? What are the criteria? What is Life Cycle Assessment? How do you understand the environmental footprint of a product? What are the materials requirements for a LEED project? Come to this workshop to get the answers to these questions.

This workshop will address the fundamentals of green materials and provide you with the knowledge to evaluate and utilize green building products to reduce your organizations environmental impacts. Topics include criteria for evaluating how green a material is, LEEDs materials requirements, how to spec for green materials and LEED, and where to find information on green products. In addition to product characteristics, methods for going from selling green, to being green will be addressed. This program is intended for architects, contractors and product manufactures, and the general public.

The presenter was Siobhan Steyn, Project Associate at The Green Roundtable.

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LEED & Green Materials LEED & Green Materials Presentation Transcript

  • The Green Roundtable and Green Materials
  • The Green Roundtable is a Registered Provider with The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to CES Records for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for non-AIA members are available on request. This program is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation. AIA/CES
  • Learning Objectives Answer the following questions: - What is the imperative for ‘doing green’ - What makes a material green - What are LEED’s requirements for materials - What are some of the tools we can use to pick green materials - What other factors must be considered besides ‘greenness’ - Where are the suppliers The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Why do green…. 4 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Not A Pretty Picture Up until now, we haven't designed and built our environment in a manner that sustains itself - that is aware of the far reaching consequences of our actions and decisions. Because we haven’t been considering the whole system. Green Building seeks to address these issues in a comprehensive way, looking at the bigger picture. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • What Do We Get From What We Build? WHAT BUILDINGS USE: 35 to 40% of total primary energy use in U.S. 65.2% of total US electricity consumption 30% of the US wood & other raw materials (3 billion tons /year) 12% of potable water in US WHAT BUILDINGS CREATE:  35-38% to US air pollution  40% to US Co2 release 32 to 40% to the US municipal solid waste stream (136 million tons of C&D waste in US = ~2.8 lbs per person/ day) Estimate by the US Green Building Council The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Environmental Impacts of Buildings INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) • Over 30% of buildings have poor indoor air quality, • Often the air inside the average home is 10 times more polluted than the outside air on the smoggiest of days, • We spend 90% of our time indoors. Marc Richmond The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Considering Multiple Attributes The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Green Product Selection OFTEN CONFLICTING PRIORITIES FEW SOLUTIONS ARE PERFECT…YET The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • New Perspective What does it look like? How much does it cost? What is the quality? How long is the lead time? How does it function? What is it made from? How is it made? Where is it manufactured? How is it disposed of after its useful life? How does it function? Does it off-gas? The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • A Solution: Building Green 11 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Overview of Criteria for Selection Embodied Energy •Initial & Recurring Materials Efficiency •Reuse & recycle, dimensional planning •Material management Resource Efficiency •Recycled content •Sourced locally Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) •During construction •Initial occupancy and over time Affordability •Material & Installation cost •Cost of alternatives The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • What is Embodied Energy? The quantity of energy required to manufacture, and supply to the point of use including: • Extraction • Assembly • Transportation • Installation • Manufacturing • Some definitions also include: Disassembly & Removal The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Embodied Energy How Does Embodied Energy Compare With Annual Operating Energy? For a typical office building: embodied energy = 10 to 30 times the annual operating energy http://www.cmmt.csiro.au/brochures/tech/embodied/index.cfm The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Resource Efficiency Recycled Content: Products with identifiable recycled content, including post-industrial content with a preference for post-consumer content. Natural, plentiful or renewable: harvested from sustainably managed sources and are certified by an independent third party. Resource efficient manufacturing process: including reducing energy consumption, minimizing waste (recycled, recyclable and or source reduced product packaging), and reducing greenhouse gases. Locally available: found locally or regionally saving energy and resources in transportation to the project site. Salvaged, refurbished, or remanufactured: saving a material from disposal and renovating, repairing, restoring, or generally improving the appearance, performance, quality, functionality, or value of a product. Reusable or recyclable: Select materials that can be easily dismantled and reused or recycled at the end of their useful life. Recycled or recyclable product packaging: Durable: longer lasting or are comparable to conventional products with long life expectancies. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Recycled Content Post-Consumer vs. Pre-Consumer Material generated by end- (Post-industrial) material diverted users of the product from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded are materials capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Indoor Air Quality Low or non-toxic: emit few or no carcinogens, reproductive toxicants, or irritants as demonstrated through appropriate testing. Minimal chemical emissions: minimal emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Products that also maximize resource and energy efficiency while reducing chemical emissions. Low-VOC assembly: Materials installed with minimal VOC-producing compounds, or no-VOC mechanical attachment methods and minimal hazards. Moisture resistant: and inhibit the growth of biological contaminants in buildings. Healthfully maintained: require only simple, non-toxic, or low-VOC methods of cleaning. Systems or equipment: promote healthy IAQ by identifying indoor air pollutants or enhancing the air quality. The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • A New Paradigm: The Cradle-to-Cradle Lifecycle See McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry http://www.mbdc.com/c2c_home.htm The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Cradle to Grave: Linear flow Materials extraction/ Mfg/ harvesting Processing End Use Disposal The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Cradle to Cradle: Cyclical End Use Demolition/ Re-Manufacture/ Removal/ Re-Processing Collection The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, LEED (not LEEDs) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The LEED Credit Categories Sustainable Sites Water Efficiency Energy & Atmosphere Materials & Resources Indoor Environmental Quality Innovation & Design Process The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • LEED Credits Impacted by Material Selection Depending on specifics of the project > 25 credits can be impacted by material and product selection. (This is almost at or above LEED certification status) Site Credit 7- Heat Island Effect (2 Points) Water Efficiency Credit 3- Water Use Reduction (2 Points) Energy & Atmosphere Energy Credit 2- Renewable Energy (1-3 Points) Energy & Atmosphere Energy Credit 1- Optimize Energy Performance (1-10 Points) Materials & Resources Credits 1-7 – Next Slide (13 points) IEQ Credit 1- Permanent CO2 monitoring system (1 point) IEQ Credit 4 -Low-emitting materials (4 Points) IEQ Credit 5- Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control (1 Point) IEQ Credit 6- Controllability of Systems (2 Points) IEQ Credit 7 -Thermal Comfort (1 Point) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • LEED Credits - Materials & Resources 13 points MR Pr 1 Storage and Collection of Recyclables Req MR C 1.1 Bldg Reuse, Maintain 75% of Existing Shell 1 MR C 1.2 Bldg Reuse, Maintain 95% of Shell 1 MR C 1.3 Bldg Reuse, Maintain 95% of Shell and 50% Interior Non-Structural 1 MR C 2.1 Construction Waste Management, Divert 50% 1 MR C 2.2 Construction Waste Management, Divert 75% 1 MR C 3.1 Materials Reuse, Specify 5% 1 MR C 3.2 Materials Reuse, Specify 10% 1 MR C 4.1 Recycled Content, Specify 10% (post consumer + ½ post industrial) 1 MR C 4.2 Recycled Content, Specify 20% (post consumer + ½ post industrial) 1 MR C 5.1 Regional Materials, 10% Extracted, Processed, & Manufactured 1 Regionally MR C 5.2 Regional Materials, 20% Extracted, Processed, & Manufactured 1 Regionally MR C 6 Rapidly Renewable Materials 1 MR C 7 Certified Wood 1 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Choosing Green Materials 56 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • General Methodology: • Define what makes a product green • Identify ‘best in class’ product characteristics • Don’t forget to factor in performance & durability characteristics • Verify green claims using 3rd party resources • Identify your most important selection criteria • Compare products side-by-side • Get additional guidance from suppliers 57 The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Some Things We May Want To Write Off: • Vinyl-based products • Products containing heavy metals and arsenic • Products containing halogenated fire-retardants • Products that emit excessive amounts of formaldehyde • Appliances that contain HCFC’s and do not meet the standards referenced by LEED The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • BEWARE OF… GREENWASHING The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • 3rd Party Resources for Judging Products • Online green product databases (e.g. GreenSpec) • Certification organizations (GreenSeal, FSC, etc.) • LCA software tools (BEES, PHAROS, etc.) • Manufacturer Material Safety Data Sheets • Other online databases like NIH hazardous materials database The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Online Resources • Environmental Building News/ Greenspec- http://www.buildinggreen.com) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Product Certification • GreenSeal (www.greenseal.org) • Scientific Certification Systems (www.scscertified.com) • GreenGuard (www.greenguard.org) • Green Label (http://www.carpet-rug.org/) (2nd party) • Forest Stewardship Council (http://www.fscus.org/) • Cradle-to-Cradle The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Considerations for Choosing & Using Best-in-Class (a brief sampling) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Concrete • At least 3-5% fly ash, recycled content and regional •Consult structural engineer for specific amount, can be as high as 40% • Components are regionally extracted: sand, water, aggregate, fly ash • Recycled and regional aggregate • Represents a large percentage of construction budget The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Steel • Can easily have over 90% recycled content, mostly post-consumer • Select a local manufacturer who gets their scrap from a local recycling facility • LEED default assumptions: 25% post-consumer recycled content • Represents a large percentage of construction budget The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Gypsum • Can easily have over 90% post-industrial recycled content • Regional facilities with products containing recycled content: •National Gypsum - Shippingport, PA •USG – Aliquippa, PA and Gypsum, OH • Synthetic Gypsum is made using waste from coal plants The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Synthetic Gypsum Synthetic (FGD) Gypsum The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Glazing • Hard to find regional products in the northeast • Recycled content in glazing is hard to find • Look for recycled content in framing • PPG Industries Solarban has post-industrial recycled content and Cradle-to-Cradle certification • Avoid vinyl framing • Use appropriate Tvis and U-values for location and design The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Furniture • GreenGaurd certification • Cradle-to-Cradle certification • Rapidly Renewable material • Recycled content • Regional materials • Low emitting materials • Recyclable at the end of their useful life • The market for nice reused furniture is growing The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Acoustical Ceiling Tile • Rapidly Renewable material • Recycled content • Regional materials • Low emitting materials • Recyclable at the end of their useful life Products: • USG • Armstrong • Ultima HRC, Optima, Cirrus Profile • Recycled content and reclamation program • Steel and Aluminum suspension systems w/ recycled content The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Lumber • Forest Stewardship Council, FSC wood (www.fsc.org) • Sourced or salvaged locally • Naturally decay-resistant: Ipe – naturally fire resistant, strong, dense hardwood, doesn’t need to be sealed • Avoid use of tropical hardwoods • Use low-VOC clear finishes (e.g. water-soluble polyurethane) from companies like AFM Safecoat • Use natural finishes like salad bowl oil (unscented), mineral oil, beeswax (waxes may contain petroleum distillates) • Use advanced framing to minimize lumber use; use efficient planning to minimize waste The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Engineered lumber/ composites (sheet goods, plywood) • Recycled or rapidly renewable fibers (FSC, GreanSeal, SCS, etc.) • Made w/ low-VOC, formaldehyde-free adhesives • Moisture & mold resistant • Use exterior grades of plywood or MDF (medium- density fiberboard); they contain phenol-formaldehyde binders rather than formaldehyde-based resin binders, which are generally safer; favor plywood over OSB • Look for SCS and FSC certification The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Paints • Low or no VOC; low odor • Good coverage (minimal coats) • Easy touch-up (e.g. good color matching w/ old vs. new) • Do not pose a disposal hazard The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Paints • Make sure paints are Green Seal or Scientific Certification Systems certified (www.greenseal.org; www.scscertified.com) • Brands: - Sherwin-Williams Harmony - Benjamin Moore Aura (& Ecospec) - Pittsburg Pure Performance - AFM Safecoat (www.afmsafecoat.com) - The Old Fashioned Milk Paint Company (www.milkpaint.com) - Livos plant paints (http://www.floorings.com/livos.html) - Yolo Colorhouse (See bettencourtwood.com) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Adhesives/ Sealants • Low or no VOC • UV resistant • Flexible (or not, depending upon application!) • Freeze-tolerant • Easy clean-up • Do not pose a disposal hazard • Look for Green Seal or Scientific Certification Systems certified (www.greenseal.org; www.scscertified.com) The Green Roundtable • Water-soluble varieties generally safer (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Carpeting and Flooring • Formaldehyde-free • Rapidly renewable – cork, natural rubber, bamboo, marmoleum (natural linoleum, Forbo) • Recycled materials – rubber, carpet • Simplified installation (e.g. doesn’t require adhesive) • Easy sectional replacement (e.g. carpet tiles) • Requires minimal maintenance (cleaning, refinishing) • PVC free • Look for Carpet and Rug Institute Green Label designation for carpets (http://www.carpet-rug.org/) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Insulation • Formaldehyde free (e.g. binders in fiberglass batts) • High recycled content (fiberglass, cellulose, denim) • HCFC-free blowing agents (foam board) • High thermal insulating characteristics! Good resistance to air infiltration (these may trump other factors if it can reduce embodied energy of structure enough) • Moisture/ mold resistant • Low flame-spread/ non-combustible The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Insulation • Look for formaldehyde-free fiberglass products- e.g. Johns Mansville (contained in some fiberglass batt binders) • Icynene spray foam one of more benign options • Newer soy-based foams may be good choice too (see www.biobased.net) • Denim insulation, a rapidly renewable material (Bonded Logic, Ultra Touch) The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Counters • Rapidly renewable or recycled materials • Cradle-to-Cradle certification (Icestone) • Mechanically fastened and don’t require finishing • Minimal off-gassing from adhesives/ binders • Avoid laminated particleboard (e.g. Formica) unless on formaldehyde-free substrate & bonded with low- VOC contact adhesive • Formaldehyde-free substrates: Wheatboard, Agriboard (see Bettencourtwood.com) • Natural stone & recycled glass might be good options The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Roofing • Made from rapidly renewable or recycled materials • High-reflectance (improves longevity, minimizes heat island effect, keeps building cooler in summer) • Green Roof • Recycled materials, like faux slate shingles made from recycled rubber • Metal roofs (like standing seam) may be sustainable due to their durability, but they may have a high embodied energy The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Some roofing options • Ecostar- www.ecostarinc.com • Authentic Roof- www.authentic-roof.com • Interlock- www.interlockroofing.com • Naturals- www.naturalsroofing.com • Note: Some of these given high marks based on durability more so than recycled content The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Additional guidelines for material efficiency • Employ advanced framing techniques in wood- framed structures • Use structure as finish • Keep it small • Use re-used/ salvaged/ surplus materials whenever possible • Use locally harvested/ extracted materials whenever possible The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Some Pitfalls in Spec’ing Green Materials • Uninformed & resistant code and municipal officials • Products that ‘go away’ • Sourcing materials in a developing market • Spec materials in Division 1, and product specific division The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • General Resources GRT: www.greenroundtable.org Building Green: www.buildinggreen.com Energy Star: www.energystar.gov Charles River Watershed: www.crwa.org US Green Building Council: www.usgbc.org Renewable Energy: www.nrel.gov US DOE: www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/ EPA: www.epa.gov/ne/greenbuildings Residential Green Building Guide: A Web Source Book for New England www.epa.gov/ne/greenbuildings NAHB: Model Green Home Building Guidelines: www.nahb.org The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Local Sources of Supply Alternative Energy Store www.altenergystore.com Boston Building Materials Coop www.bbmc.com Boston Materials Resource Center www.bostonbmrc.org Boston ReStore www.bostonrestore.org Green Depot www.greendepot.com The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Local sources of supply, cont. Pure Home Center www.purehomecenter.com Green Source Supply and Design www.greensourcesupply.com NE Green Building www.NEgreen.com The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • And Don’t Forget About NEXUS! • Upcoming workshops • Reference library • Samples library – Nutrition Labels • Cyber Lounge • Online resources at nexusboston.com (in the pipeline) • Local green building community The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Questions? This concludes The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems Program The Green Roundtable (copyright © Green Roundtable 2007)
  • Thank You The Green Roundtable 617-374-3740 www.greenroundtable.org info@greenroundtable.org