Digital Publishing Trends To Watch This Year and Their Potential Impact on Libraries
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Digital Publishing Trends To Watch This Year and Their Potential Impact on Libraries

on

  • 187 views

LITA Conference 2012

LITA Conference 2012

Statistics

Views

Total Views
187
Views on SlideShare
187
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Apple Keynote

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • \n
  • the ultimate digital publishing start-up --- the book with no words. \n
  • truth is stranger than fiction\n
  • a set up slide - the flood gates have opened\n
  • A bit about what we have done thus far ...We complied a dataset of digital publishing startups - 161 - sean parker - much hyped airtime - “Running a start-up is like eating glass. You just start to like the taste of your own blood.”\nabout page ... descriptors/trends/buckets ... 11 . none are mutually exclusive (describing different parts of the elephant) so, maybe it makes more sense to talk about 6 or 7 or 8 trends. point is, we have pulled some out here to look at and describe, show some examples, and end with some discussion about their potential impact on libraries - particularly in terms of opportunities and challenges.\nPDF for print-on-demand\n
  • \n
  • getting access to the “worlds” owned by traditional publishing - allow the written world to inhabit literary worlds owned by publishers. 50 shades of grey grew out of a multi part series of fan fiction called masters of the universe.\nread - you influence the narrative. authors have online tools to learn what readers are enjoying. tools show how readers are reading. authors can build off/upon “teasers.” \n
  • maybe taking literary-ties at bit too far ...\n
  • Like intelligence tests, Torrance’s test—a 90-minute series of discrete tasks, administered by a psychologist—has been taken by millions worldwide in 50 languages. Yet there is one crucial difference between IQ and CQ scores. With intelligence each generation, scores go up about 10 points. Enriched environments are making kids smarter. With creativity, a reverse trend has just been identified and is being reported for the first time here: American creativity scores are falling.\n\n It is the scores of younger children in America—from kindergarten through sixth grade—for whom the decline is “most serious.”\n
  • spend our time doing something creative, getting to the end of the book and not wanting it to end (the experience with the characters). look at how people write and reward people for writing (tip jars). fresh approach to spending time in front of a computer - not quite gaming. It’s a positive cooperative experience and inspiring people to create stories, not just consume them.\nAt it’s heart it's a game of Narrator versus Hero. The narrator controls the story; crafting a plot and presenting the Hero with encounters, and challenges. The Hero creates a character that she believes can make it through to the end. And when the story’s over it lives inside the Written World, for other people to read, re-use or play themselves.\nForce allows you to change the path of a story.\nThink that sword should be a fish? that alien shouldn’t leave? Romeo shouldn’t take the poison? use Force to make it happen.\nEarn Force by writing well, progressing through stories, and creating great characters and places.\n\n
  • How does our game perform with young students? We were testing with a group of 10-12 year olds. It’s always been our contention that The Written World needs to be accessible to younger players. Equally it’s our belief that if things can be simplified, they ought to be. In short - if there’s anything that could be done to our game to make it easier to play with for this audience, that’s going to benefit everyone.\nDoes our game help people to write structured stories?We’re trying to build something which is a blast to play and write with, but also supports people in writing stories with an established dramatic structure. In a classroom context, this is a teaching tool - but is it succesful?\nDoes our game create value for teachers?We want to know if a game like the one we are making could be a useful tool for teachers to use in a classroom with their students - and if it isn’t, we want to know how to make it more so. Building classroom specific features into the game will of course always take a backseat to development of our other features, but it’s great to learn what we can do to make this project something with a more positive social footprint.\n\n
  • \n
  • FALLEN LONDON\nA subterranean Victorian fantasy with a cult reputation.  Almost a million words of vivid, sardonic life in the underworld.\nWinner of  The Escapist’s Best Browser Game, 2009.\nhttp://www.kickstarter.com/projects/elizabethsampat/tales-of-fallen-london-the-silver-tree\n
  • A transmedia project built for Random House to promote Erin Morgenstern’s bestselling novel of the same name.\nWinner of the FutureBook award for Best Digital Marketing Campaign, 2011Winner of the BMA Bookseller Best Marketing Campaign, 2012\n\n
  • \n
  • story telling and play help us learn and grow and deal w/new experiences. technology and platform to combine storytelling and play to bring experiences to people - where ever they are - web, mobile, tv, real world.\n\n
  • transmedia story telling (production) - telling a story across multiple platforms and formats using current digital technologies. develop stories across multiple forms of media in order to deliver unique pieces of content in each channel. not only are these pieces of content linked together, but they are also in narrative synchronization.\n
  • Set in 2013 after a nuclear bomb has destroyed London, Spooks: Code 9 created a fascinating world for primetime viewers. We extended that world with Liberty News (not accessible in the US), an online news site where viewers could read articles and contribute their own content about the UK in 2013.\nIn a first, updates on Liberty News occurred simultaneously with the live TV broadcast. Seconds after an explosion on the show, Liberty News would update with a breaking news story with additional information, photos, videos and comments.\nViewers and critics alike praised the immersive and live nature of the website – particularly the Twitter text message updates. With the target 16-24 audience often surfing the web at the same time as watching TV, Liberty News was the perfect way of extending the drama and action of Spooks: Code 9 onto the internet.\n\n
  • A new way of telling location-based stories through smartphones, using mobile HTML5 with Foursquare and Twitter integration.\nWanderlust is an experimental mobile storytelling platform that works on all smartphones including iPhones, Android, and WebOS. Using a simple web-based editing interface, writers can create stories that move readers from location to location – but unlike previous location-based stories, these locations aren’t fixed. Act 1 of a story could require readers to be in a cafe – any cafe in the world; and Act 2 could take place inany bar in the world.\nIt’s not just location-based – it’s atmosphere-based storytelling.\nWanderlust combines the GPS feature of smartphones with Foursquare’s database of venues to determine whether readers are in the right type of place to continue the story – and if not, to help guide them to the nearest cafe (or bar, or museum, or shop…).We’ve created Wanderlust as a web-based app, meaning that readers can access stories without installing anything. Thanks to JQuery Mobile, Wanderlust is also fully compatible with a wide range of smartphones including iOS, Android, WebOS, and any other standards-compliant mobile browser. In fact, Wanderlust even works on any modern computer browser such as Firefox, Chrome, or Safari.\n\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Literary magazine has come full circle iTunes of the written word (15 to 60 pages/.99c)\n
  • iTunes of the written word,\n a new generation of publishers doing exciting things with the short story.\n\nWe are a digital-only publisher specialising in short stories from emerging and established writers.\nEveryone is busy nowadays. But there's always time for a short story. Here you'll find stories, short and sweet, which you can buy one by one. That means you can discover new writers and new stories and read them in the time it takes you to get to work, wait for a friend in a bar, or in any spare moment you have to yourself.\nWe believe both that writers should be paid properly and readers should not have to spend a fortune to find new writers, and our prices reflect that. Short stories will be priced at 99p each to provide the best of both worlds: a competitive price for the reader and a fair return for the author. Shortfire Press works on a no-advance, profit-share basis.\n\n
  • Shortfire Press is delighted to present something exciting we've been working away on in collaboration with tech company ustwo for a while - PAPERCUT, a new app which could completely change the way we read. In this brave new world of enhanced ebooks, we think we've come across something completely new. It's an experiment in reading in a new way, and features innovative software which allows the app to tell where the reader is in the text and to trigger various 'events' - audio, visual and video - which relate to that specific passage. We've developed three stories - all from Shortfire authors - Topple from Laura Dockrill, poet and illustrator, Summer in the City from Nadifa Mohamed, and James Joyce, EFL Teacher from Richard Beard - and the result is somewhere between an enhanced ebook, an audiobook and a film.\n
  • \n
  • By feeding a set of numbers through its systems, the two-year-old Narrative Science can generate stories in English that can explain the data from charts, graphs and spreadsheets to their customers.\n\n“If there’s data. we can write the story,”\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • paid services - ala carte\n
  • beyond books - magazine, catalogs, educational, corporate\n
  • just magazines, catalogs, reports\n
  • low barriers to entry, fast - easy - free\n\n\n
  • communal / social apects for writers and aspiring writings\n\n
  • a new way to identify what readers want\n\nnew relationships between writers and readers - publishing equals relationship between readers and writers\n\ninnovative funding model\n\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • we can’t transition to the mostly digital fast enough\n
  • brain’s love habits - doesn’t take long - human brain adapts to technology in seven days, regardless of age.\n\nI rarely read things on paper anymore. Magazines, news articles and books are all consumed on touch-screen devices like iPads, smartphones and Kindles. (The content is the same; the device is different.) Mr. Nass explained that my brain had been habituated to change the page by sliding my finger, no matter what I read. (This is also why I uselessly swipe ATM monitors or my laptop screen.)\n
  • \n
  • Technology company Auto-Graphics has partnered with publishing platform FastPencil to bring FastPencil's book publishing engine Library Management Platform to libraries around the country. Library members will have the ability to use FastPencil’s platform to write, design, publish and sell books in print and digital formats directly through their local libraries.\n\nwill expand into more of a content management tool for libraries, said Wilson, growing beyond a self-publishing platform into something that will hopefully foster a marketplace within participating libraries.\n
  • \n

 Digital Publishing Trends To Watch This Year and Their Potential Impact on Libraries Digital Publishing Trends To Watch This Year and Their Potential Impact on Libraries Presentation Transcript

  • 11 Digital PublishingTrends To Watch This Yearand Their Potential Impact On Libraries LITA National Forum October 5, 2012
  • Source: http://xkcd.com/971/
  • Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19706724
  • Revolution“There are decades where nothing happens; and there areweeks where decades happen.” -- V.I. LeninNov. 2007 Kindle, July 2010 ebooks outsell newhardcovers, April 2011 ebooks outsell all print booksPA 2.6 mm children’s ebooks sold 1st half of 2012More the half of US adults have a tablet or smartphone2 billion internet connected devices and 5 billionsmartphones41% of tablet owners have used their devices to access
  • Wild WestTremendous growth in digital publishingNew technologies - iPad, iPhone, Kindle,Nook, HTML5, cloud computing, jQuerymobile, high resolution graphicsCreativity, experimentation, imaginationPaper to digital, passive to interactive,individual to social, consumer to producerMobile technology Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ File:Video_Killed_the_Radio_Star_single_cover.jpgPrint is in secular decline
  • Story TellingTechnology and platform to combinestorytelling & playOriginal transmedia & alternativereality gamesCreative experience Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ ryancolemanphotography/4682100378/Look at how people write and rewardpeople for writingLiterary tie-ins
  • “Transmedia storytelling isstorytelling by a number ofdecentralized authors whoshare and create content fordistribution across multipleforms of media. Transmediaimmerses an audience in astory’s universe through anumber of dispersed entrypoints, providing acomprehensive andcoordinated experience of acomplex story.”
  • GPS Smartphone + Foursquare = Mobile Storytelling Platform
  • High InteractionMulti-sensoryengagementContentmanipulationOpen-endedEducational Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/digitalsadhu/2393258385/
  • Short FormA renaissance in short-storywriting or Literature meetsmobileShort of money & short of timeTake stories out of their parentcollections and make them assingles or small bundlesPreviously unpublished or hardto find stories - reprints notreadily availableExcerpts from forthcoming works
  • Social ReadingOrganize books into categoriesand listsShare comment, thoughts,reviews, and ratingsInteract with friends, peoplewith similar reading interests,or authorsDiscover books of interestDiscuss books in depth “in themargins”Purchase vs. Borrowing Source: http://appazoogle.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/word-of-mouth- book.jpg
  • Start-to-Finish PublishingWriters are the new publishersLowering barriers to entryOne to many - Android, iOS, Windows8, WebMost cloud based ebook publishing platformE-book distributor - free, with 70-85% of the net proceedsgoing to the author, no exclusive publishing contracts,multiple distribution channelsAssumptions - more unit profit for author/publisher, lowerprices for consumers, greater demand and consumption
  • Anyone Can Be ShakespeareEasy to use authoring/conversion tools - drag and drop UIAdd in interactive elements - HTML5, video, audioPush button distribution/content delivery networkUse metrics and sales trackingAla carte services $$$ - cover design, formatting,editing, marketing, other
  • Publishing is not evolving. Publishing is going away.Because the word “publishing” means a cadre ofprofessionals who are taking on the incredibledifficulty and complexity and expense of makingsomething public. That’s not a job anymore. That’sa button. There’s a button that says “publish,”and when you press it, it’s done.-- Clay Shirky
  • Customization/ PersonalizationUser controlRefined contentPush vs. Pull Source:http://www.flickr.com/photos/will-lion/2846372394/
  • Challenges ... Opportunities ?
  • Thanks for YourAttention & Interest Aaron K. Shrimplin shrimpak@miamiOH.edu Eli Sullivan sullive4@miamiOH.edu Miami University Libraries