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Vision and Strategy for Campus Enterprise Architecture Roadmaps
Vision and Strategy for Campus Enterprise Architecture Roadmaps
Vision and Strategy for Campus Enterprise Architecture Roadmaps
Vision and Strategy for Campus Enterprise Architecture Roadmaps
Vision and Strategy for Campus Enterprise Architecture Roadmaps
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Vision and Strategy for Campus Enterprise Architecture Roadmaps

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  • 1. Vision and Strategy for Campus Enterprise Architecture Roadmaps Adopted by Information Technology Architecture Committee (ITAC) UC Berkeley December, 2007
  • 2. ENTERPRISE INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE ROADMAP VISION Berkeley is a leader in using information, both structured and unstructured, to enhance the mission of the university. The campus uses best information management practices and values information as a key strategic asset, apart from its value in running day-to-day operations. Berkeley enhances the value of its information resources by appropriately describing, cataloging, mining, and interpreting this resource. Access to information is provided in a ubiquitous and secure manner to all campus stakeholders to meet their university-related needs, including academic, administrative, research, and public service. The unstructured information contained in university web sites is efficiently maintained by providing appropriate, easy-to-use tools to those that own the information. There is a single version of enterprise information that campus stakeholder can easily subscribe to and use instead of duplicating the information in local systems. Information is appropriately accessible anytime, anywhere in areas where internet access capability allows for such access. Faculty has access to easy to use tools that allow them to appropriately store, maintain, and share information for academic and research purposes. The knowledge of the university is appropriately protected and archived for future use. Information is securely accessed and privacy laws and regulations are followed in all aspects of information management. STRATEGY Promote the value of managing information as a key strategic asset by creating an effective campus governance structure for information management. Clarify the role of the existing Data Stewardship Council in this governance structure. The elements of the overall governance structure are documented in this roadmap. Develop a best-practices technology infrastructure for information management and commit the campus leadership to deploy this infrastructure as a core-funded service to the university. Where appropriate, this infrastructure should be leveraged across the entire organization, including instructional, research, and administrative uses. This infrastructure assists in the management of both structured and unstructured data. Promote best- of-breed data stewardship practices through Berkeley’s Data Stewardship Council. Continuously examine the campus culture for its ability to support the vision and goals of this roadmap and make recommendations on how to address areas where campus culture is at odds with the stated vision and strategy. Develop a “certification” curriculum for campus data management professionals to follow in order to be promoted along the new “Data Management” job titles. Clarify the role of a Campus Enterprise Data Architect in the governance structure. Support the use of state-of-the-art software for user identification and the management of access to campus information resources. Partner with faculty in developing best practices and infrastructure for academic and research information management. 2
  • 3. ENTERPRISE BUSINESS PROCESS ARCHITECTURE ROADMAP VISION Berkeley is a leader in providing services to all of its stakeholders using technology to “break” the boundaries created by processes that fall within the purview of several campus departments or internal-external organizations. The management of these processes is an integrated task involving both functional/business owners as well as information technology staff. Academic and administrative processes are documented, and this documentation is an integral part of the development and maintenance of the technology services used to support them. Technology is used to assist in all aspects of process design, modeling, deployment, execution, and management and these tasks are integrated and serve the needs of functional owners and technology staffs in supporting these processes. Academic and administrative processes requiring information technology are built using shareable components that allow changes to be implemented with agility in response to changing campus needs. Analysis of business processes is the purview of not just the central IT organization, but the entire campus and all its control units. Process analysis will ensure effective knowledge transfer and management as we face the coming changes in the workforce. STRATEGY Explain and promote the value of managing academic and administrative processes in a fully integrated manner at all levels of the organization. Suggest the creation of an “Academic and Administrative Business Process Center of Excellence” to serve the purpose of developing and promoting best practices. Develop a best-practices technology infrastructure for business process management and commit the campus leadership to deploy this infrastructure as a core- funded service to the university. Where appropriate, this infrastructure should be leveraged across the entire organization, including instructional, research, and administrative uses. This infrastructure assists the campus in designing, modeling, deploying, executing, managing, and documenting these services. Research, assess, and propose the reference technology architecture as part of this roadmap in close coordination with a reference applications architecture roadmap. Promote best-of-breed business process management practices through the Center of Excellence. Continuously examine the campus culture for its ability to support the vision and goals of this roadmap and make recommendations on how to address areas where campus culture is at odds with the stated vision and strategy. Develop a “certification” curriculum for campus business process analysts to follow in order to be promoted along the new “Business Analyst” job titles. Assess the possible role of a Campus Enterprise Business Process Architect in the governance structure created through the Center of Excellence. 3
  • 4. ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS ARCHITECTURE ROADMAP VISION Berkeley is a leader in developing software systems using a services-oriented architecture (SOA) in conjunction with the approaches described in the campus Enterprise Business Process Architecture roadmap. Berkeley has a robust SOA infrastructure and governance processes that allow all campus IT departments and the central IT organization to collaboratively develop high- quality software systems using SOA. Berkeley is able to use open source systems as well as vendor-provided and in-house solutions using this framework. All campus software developers have the skills needed to develop applications using a SOA framework and the campus infrastructure deployed for governing and managing these services. Because it is tightly coupled with the defined vision and strategies in its Enterprise Business Process and Information architectures, Berkeley’s approach to applications development produces systems that consistently meet current and emerging campus needs and are maintainable in a cost-effective and agile way. While developing applications within a SOA framework, campus developers have relative freedom to choose the programming languages and other developer tools that best fit their past experiences, skill levels, and preferences. This vision is not meant not impede campus academic researchers from innovating in areas related to software and systems development. STRATEGY Explain and promote the value of using a SOA approach to applications development at all levels of the campus IT and business communities. Suggest the creation of a “SOA Center of Excellence” to serve the purpose of developing and promoting best practices and providing campus-wide SOA governance. Develop a best-practices technology infrastructure for SOA and commit the campus leadership to deploy this infrastructure as a core-funded service to the university. Where appropriate, this infrastructure should be leveraged across the entire organization, including instructional, research, and administrative uses. This infrastructure assists campus application developers in exposing, finding, re-using, documenting, managing, testing, provisioning, and orchestration web services for the rapid delivery of SOA applications. Research, assess, and propose the reference technology architecture as part of this roadmap in close coordination with a reference business process architecture roadmap. Use the SOA Center of Excellence to manage the campus' incursion towards SOA. Continuously examine the campus culture for its ability to support the vision and goals of this roadmap and make recommendations on how to address areas where campus culture is at odds with the stated vision and strategy. Develop and deploy strategies to train IT staffs in SOA and the use of the future campus SOA infrastructure. Develop a “certification” curriculum for campus application developers to follow in order to be promoted along the new “Application Developer” job titles. Work with strategic campus vendors and existing and new software partners to explain the campus long-term approach to applications development and develop collaborative strategies that allow internal-external applications integration as well as use of new web technologies in the areas of social networks and community software development. 4
  • 5. ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE ARCHITECTURE ROADMAP VISION Berkeley is a leader in the deployment of an information technology (IT) infrastructure that supports the campus vision for information management, applications development, and business process management (see roadmaps for Information Architecture, Applications Development, and Business Processes.) The IT infrastructure is provided using the most cost-effective approaches, including outsourcing when and where appropriate. The infrastructure is secure and protects confidential and sensitive data while providing appropriate systems and information access to individuals based on their role on campus. Enterprise systems are built to be scalable, reliable, resilient and highly available. Where appropriate, computing equipment is deployed in a manner that minimizes energy consumption and our carbon footprint. Where appropriate, the infrastructure is leveraged across the entire organization. The infrastructure supports a broad set of users, including mobile workers and students using mobile devices where appropriate. This vision is not meant not impede campus academic researchers from innovating in areas related to technology infrastructure development and deployment. STRATEGY Continue to strive to reduce IT infrastructure costs by embracing emerging trends such as server and desktop virtualization, wireless services, and phone communications over Internet networks. Efforts are made to improve the energy efficiency and reduce the carbon footprint of computing equipment. These improvements are considered as part of the procurement process. Implement a secure, robust, and comprehensive Identity and Information Access Management (IdM, IAM) infrastructure that provides role-based access to all campus enterprise applications and mission critical systems. Continue to place emphasis on systems and information security as well as business resumption. Seek every opportunity to centralize and leverage investments in technology infrastructure, including cyber infrastructure such as, for example, message-oriented middleware. Embrace and support community-sourced models of software infrastructure development as a way to enhance collaborative multi-institutional efforts and put market pressure to keep IT costs down. 5

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