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Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ...
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  • 1. EUROPEAN ORGANISATION FOR THE SAFETY OF AIR NAVIGATION EUROCONTROL Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ATM - Conceptual Information Model (D5) Document Identifier: OATA-MCS-12-05 Edition: 3.01 Edition Date: 12-06-2009 EUROPEAN AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT
  • 2. Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ATM - Conceptual Information Model (D5) DOCUMENT CHARACTERISTICS TITLE Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ATM - Conceptual Information Model (D5) EATM Infocentre Reference: Document Identifier: OATA-MCS-12-05 Edition: 3.01 Contractual Ref: TRS 08-111642-C Version Date: 12-06-2009 Contractual ID: D5 Abstract This document describes the Conceptual Information Model (D5) which have been developed in the context of the Eurocontrol TRS entitled “Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ATM”. Keywords EAEA Conceptual Information Model OATA MCS SESAR Contact Person(s) Tel Unit Prepared by: John R F Guy +44 1489 616526 NATS Issued by: Michael Heap +44 1489 444424 NATS STATUS, AUDIENCE AND ACCESSIBILITY Status Intended for Accessible via In progress General Public Intranet Internal Draft EATM Stakeholders Extranet Working Draft x Restricted Audience Configuration Manager Proposed Issue Printed & electronic copies of the document can be obtained from the Released Issue EATM Infocentre or from the OATA PSO ELECTRONIC SOURCE Path: File Name: Host System: Software Application Size: Windows XP: Microsoft Word 10.0 Publications OATA Project Support Office (PSO) EUROCONTROL Headquarters EUROCONTROL Headquarters 96 Rue de la Fusée, B-1130 BRUSSELS 96 Rue de la Fusée, B-1130 BRUSSELS Tel: +32 (0)2 729 47 15 Tel: +32 (0)2 729 50 40 Fax: +32 (0)2 729 51 49 E-mail: publication@eurocontrol.int E-mail: oata.pso@eurocontrol.int OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: ii of 17
  • 3. Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ATM - Conceptual Information Model (D5) DOCUMENT APPROVAL The following table identifies all management authorities who have successively approved the present issue of this document. AUTHORITY NAME AND SIGNATURE DATE Project Manager P. Monaco 06-03-2009 (v3.0) Quality Manager S. Exbrayat 12-06-2009 (v3.01) EA Unit Manager A. Prister 12-06-2009 (v3.01) DOCUMENT CONTROL Copyright notice © 2009 European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL). All rights reserved. "Member States of the Organisation are entitled to use and reproduce this document for internal and non-commercial purpose under their vested tasks. Any disclosure to third parties shall be subject to prior written permission of EUROCONTROL". DOCUMENT CHANGE RECORD The following table records the complete history of the successive editions of the present document. Edition Edition Date Reason for change Pages affected Number 0.1 24-12-2008 Working draft document All Annex 5 modified Business Concepts 0.9 12-01-2009 Preparation of draft document Chapter Recommendations Chapter Conclusion Editorial changes Elaboration of the Business 1.0 05-02-2009 Annex 6 added. Concepts from Work Shop 3. Update after BAA, NATS, Air 2.0 23-02-2009 Space User Group and LFV All meeting. 3.0 06-03-2009 Final version All 3.01 12-06-2009 Update Approval Status OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: iii of 17
  • 4. Initial Activities in Enterprise Architecture application to ATM - Conceptual Information Model (D5) TABLE OF CONTENTS DOCUMENT CHARACTERISTICS ........................................................................................................ II DOCUMENT APPROVAL...................................................................................................................... III DOCUMENT CONTROL ........................................................................................................................ III DOCUMENT CHANGE RECORD ......................................................................................................... III TABLE OF CONTENTS......................................................................................................................... IV 1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 5 2 DEFINITIONS AND ACRONYMS................................................................................................... 6 3 OVERVIEW ..................................................................................................................................... 8 3.1 CONCEPTUAL INFORMATION MODEL (CIM).................................................................................. 8 3.2 CONTEXT FOR THE DEVELOPED CIM ........................................................................................... 9 4 HIGH LEVEL ATM BUSINESS CONCEPTS................................................................................ 10 4.1 HIGH LEVEL BUSINESS CONCEPT MODEL – BUSINESS CONCEPTS .............................................. 10 4.2 HIGH LEVEL BUSINESS CONCEPT MODEL - BUSINESS SUBJECT AREAS....................................... 11 4.2.1 Business Subject Areas – relationship to D8 ................................................................ 12 4.2.2 Business Concept definitions ........................................................................................ 12 4.2.3 Subject Area defnitions.................................................................................................. 13 4.3 SAFETY ................................................................................................................................... 15 5 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................................ 16 5.1 CONCLUSIONS ......................................................................................................................... 16 5.2 RECOMMENDATIONS ................................................................................................................ 16 OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: iv of 17
  • 5. 1 INTRODUCTION The results delivered from the SESAR Project Definition (PD) phase recommended that an Enterprise Architecture (EA) approach, together with taking a Service-Oriented Approach (SOA), be used as the basis to manage the development of the Future European ATM System. Consequently, the need for a European ATM Enterprise Architecture (EAEA) was identified. It was recognised by many of the ATM stakeholders participating in the SESAR PD phase that a first set of EA & SOA activities needed to be undertaken urgently in order to facilitate and steer the subsequent programme of work to be undertaken during the SESAR Development Phase. The objective of this study is to develop some initial versions of some of the main artefacts and views of an EAEA, but with a scope restricted to an Airport context. The study also aims to gain knowledge and experience on how taking an EA approach can be used in the SESAR Development Phase in order to validate which approach shall be taken in the future. Eurocontrol has proposed an initial description of an EAEA framework, tailored to covering SESAR’s requirements and based upon existing EA frameworks. The EAEA framework proposed by Eurocontrol is based on the NATO architecture framework (NAF) and UK Ministry of Defence architecture framework (MODAF), but is customised to adapt aspects of them to meet ATM needs. This initial EAEA framework will be applied to the extent considered relevant to the scope of this study, it being further refined based upon the experience gained in applying it to the practical application of considering activities performed at and around an Airport. The EAEA framework proposed by Eurocontrol comprises the following views: e.g. Gantt Chart Goal Problem Opportunity e.g. Performance Targets Strategic View Business Strategies Organisation / Operational Human Actor Service e.g. Organisational Structure Operational View Process Model Timing Process Information Conceptual Information Model System e.g. Logical Architecture Service-Oriented View Information Service AICM, FOIPS Activities Projects / System Interface System View e.g. Technical Architecture Information AIXM, ICOG ICDs Programme View Software Network e.g. Implementation Standards Technical View / Implemented Systems Physical Architecture Hardware ATM Infrastructure Fig.1 : Overview of Eurocontrol EAEA Framework This document deals with a sub-set of the Operational View, namely the Conceptual Information Model (referred to as “Information” in Fig.1), this being defined with respect to the notion of an ATM Performance (ATMPP) between the “Users of the Network” (i.e., the Airspace Users, Airport Operators and Air Navigation Service Providers) as described in the deliverables (Refs.2 to 7) produced during the SESAR PD phase. OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 5 of 17
  • 6. 2 DEFINITIONS AND ACRONYMS ACRONYMS DEFINITIONS AICM Aeronautical Information Conceptual Model AIXM Aeronautical Information Exchange Model ATC Air Traffic Control ATM Air Traffic Management ATMPP ATM Performance Partnership BAA British Airports Authority DFS Deutsche Flugsicherung EA Enterprise Architecture EADS European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company EAEA European ATM Enterprise Architecture ENAV Ente Nazionale Assistenza al Volo ETA Estimated Time of Arrival FOIPS Flight Object Interoperability Proposed Standard ICAO International Civil Aviation Organisation ICDs Interface Control Documents ICOG Interoperability Consultation Group KPA Key Performance Area I.T. Information Technology KPI Key Performance Indicator LOC Line-of-Change MOD Ministry of Defence (United Kingdom) MODAF MOD Architecture Framework NAF NATO Architecture Framework NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organisation OBG Operational (Business) Goal OI Operational Improvement R&D Research & Development RBT Reference Business Trajectory SBT Shared Business Trajectory SESAR Single European Sky ATM Research SESAR JU SESAR Joint Undertaking SESAR PD SESAR Project Definition SICTA Sistemi Innovativi per il Controllo del Traffico Aereo OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 6 of 17
  • 7. SOA Service-Oriented Approach TRS Task Requirement Sheet 4D Four dimensional OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 7 of 17
  • 8. 3 OVERVIEW This document describes a Conceptual Information Model (CIM). It has been developed using the material from the Working Session and making use of the expertise of the TRS Consortium and Eurocontrol, so that the CIM developed, addresses the airport centric scenario being considered. Other material developed at the Working Session and subsequently, has been included in an Annex for future reference and consideration. 3.1 Conceptual Information Model (CIM) A Conceptual Information Model is a model supporting all users so that they can develop a common understanding of terms within their business domain. A CIM is a prerequisite for the development of consistent and interoperable information systems. A CIM describes only the “what” a business is concerned with and not the “how” a business is conducted. This ensures that a CIM is not governed by business rules and is not affected by ongoing business changes over time. A CIM within the ATM domain should focus on the key concepts needed for the interoperation between stakeholders both regionally and globally. A common CIM containing clearly identified key concepts will support the development of future ATM information systems and furthermore, future ATM Services will be based on these concepts defined within the CIM. The content of the CIM is governed by reference to existing architecture frameworks which provide overall guidance as to what should be covered. This includes the following ; • ATM Business Goals, objectives and performance measures related to each business function (Motivation/Why). • High level business functions (Function/How) • High-level data classes related to each function (Data/What) • Stakeholders related to each function (People/Who) • VA locations related to each function (Network/Where) • Cycles and events related to each function (Time/When) • Policies, procedures and standards for each process (Motivation/Why) • Business Processes (Function/How) • Business Data (Data/What) • Roles and responsibilities in each process (People/Who) • Locations related to each process (Network/Where) • Events for each process and sequencing of integration and process improvements (Time/When) The D5 CIM attempts to reflect the ATM business as closely as possible. It defines a business information architecture that is realistic and feasible to implement, and that captures the goals and the objectives for the ATM Enterprise. It also represents the consensus view of the Stakeholders and should be easy to understand, readily adaptable to change and foster communication between the different stakeholders of the ATM Enterprise. OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 8 of 17
  • 9. 3.2 Context for the developed CIM The model which has been developed is shown later in the document. It is recognised that it requires further analysis and expansion to cater for the overall needs of all Stakeholders in the ATM Enterprise. At this time, the model captures the highest level business concepts that have been identified for the Airport scenario as part of this activity. It also lists the subject areas for each of the business concepts and provides further detail concerning each of the business concepts. The CIM for ATM will always be evolving as new requirements and ATM services are identified, however the CIM should be capale of meeting this need. OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 9 of 17
  • 10. 4 HIGH LEVEL ATM BUSINESS CONCEPTS 4.1 High level Business Concept Model – Business Concepts The high level Business Concept Model is shown with each box representing a business concept. It also shows the links (involvement) between business concepts. class Concept Model Iteration 1 «ATM Business Concept» Transportation +movement_of_people_and_goods +scope_and_content_of_the_transportation +is_executed_by_resources +defines_activities_to_be_performed «ATM Business Concept» «ATM Business Concept» Activ ity +holds_facilities_and_resources Asset +anything_that_moves +what_and_when +describes_the_required_movement +gives_instructions +the_actuall_movement «ATM Business Concept» «ATM Business Concept» Communi cation Mov e ment +communication_process +holds_facilities_and_resources «ATM Business Concept» Spa ce +control_assets +the_continuous_expanse +communication_control_items +control_space +holds_resources_and_facilities «ATM Business Concept» Gov er nance +measure_performance +plans_work +imparted_actors «ATM Business Concept» Party +measure_processes_functions +organisation_people +monitor_measutre_area_of_responsibility +capacity_and_demand +something_happening +measure_capacity_and_demand «ATM Business Concept» +measure_activities Meas ure OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 10 of 17
  • 11. 4.2 High level Business Concept Model - Business Subject Areas. Business Concepts comprise of a number of subject areas that are described by the same types of characteristics. The subject areas that have been identified, are shown below. Some of the subjects (eg facility, flight, business trajectory) will be further described by ‘qualifiers’ in order to capture different stages of the life-cycle of e.g. a BT with all information regarding its´ actual position and a predicted position about 25 minutes later. This is the same BT for a different point in the life-cycle. class Concept Model Iteration 1 Asset Association Activ ity «Concept» «Concept» «Concept» Facility Cont rol Physical_transfer Reso urce Ownership Transfer_of _ownership Utility Assignment Transfer_o f_control Measurement Calcul ation Request Authorise Foreca sting Crewing Capacity_management Mov e ment Party Turn_a round Inspe ction «Concept» «Concept» Separation Flight Person Seque ncing Traffic Organi sation Resource_management Business Trajectory Transportation Communi cation Meas ure «Concept» «Concept» «Concept» Vehicle Instru ction Constraint Tra in Cont rol Goals Sh ip Guid ance Objectives Aircraft Direc tion Dem and Collabo ration Capacity Approval Performance News Traffic_flow ATC_clearance Safety Condi tion Spa ce Gov er nance «Concept» «Concept» Airspace Stan dard Surf ace Oblig ation Ti me Law_pre cedence Loca tion OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 11 of 17
  • 12. 4.2.1 Business Subject Areas – relationship to D8 Asset; Utility excluded from D8 - out of scope. Transportation; Vehicle excluded from D8 – considered under Resource. Train and Ship excluded from D8 – out of scope. Association; This is a link between any two or more business concepts and is excluded from D8 – out of scope. Communication; Control and Direction are excluded from D8 – covered under Instruction. Collaboration – out of scope for this particular activity. Activity; Physical transfer, Transfer of ownership, Transfer of Control, Measurement, Calculation, Request, Authorise – out of scope. 4.2.2 Business Concept definitions Asset A Business Concept that includes Resource and Facility. Association A link between one or more business concepts. Activity An Activity is something takes place to accomplish a particular task or produce an end result. Communication Communication is the process whereby information is imparted by a sender (provider) to a receiver (consumer) and includes both verbal and nonverbal communication. Governance Governance relates to the policies, procedures, processes and decisions that define expectations, set high level requirements and verify performance of a particular topic. Measure Measure is the process by which the effectiveness of any particular subject is determined. Movement A unit of work that describes the movement of something of interest to an organisation. OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 12 of 17
  • 13. Party Party is a generic term that includes both person and organisation. Space Space is a portion of the continuous expanse in which things exist and move. Space is expressed in terms of coordinates. Space is relative and must be expressed in terms of a coordinate system and an origin. Transportation The movement of people and goods from one location to another. Transportation is performed by various modes, such as air, rail road, water, cable, and pipeline. 4.2.3 Subject Area defnitions Facility An entity with a capacity to perform work and capabilities that can be allocated to perform a specific unit (kind) of work and can be scheduled. Facility represents a fixed asset such as a building or stand. Resource An entity with a capacity to perform work and capabilities that can be allocated to perform a specific unit (kind) of work and can be scheduled. Represents something that is not a fixed asset - this would be any resource that is capable of being moved to perform work at the point it is required. It would cover specialist equipment; vehicles; containers etc Flight The operation of an aircraft on a flight stage or number of flight stages with the same flight number. Business Trajectory The Business Trajectory is always associated with all the data needed to describe the flight. The Business/Mission Trajectory evolves out of a layered (CDM) planning process. The different development phases of the trajectory are the: • Business Development Trajectory (BDT); • Shared Business Trajectory (SBT); • Reference Business Trajectory (RBT). Aircraft Any machine that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reactions of the air other than the reactions of the air against the earth surface. OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 13 of 17
  • 14. Time Time is a period or point in time on the time continuum. Airspace A generic term used within ATM to describe a volume through which an aircraft could fly. Surface Surface is a space with a depth of zero. Surface is not necessarily two dimensional e.g. the boundary between two layers of a mountain. ATC Clearance Authorization for an aircraft to proceed under the conditions specified by an air traffic control unit. Condition A semantic condition or restriction. Traffic Flow A generic term used within ATM in order to describe Flights. Demand Demand is the aggregate need to cater for traffic placed on the ATM system. Capacity A view of capacity as a result of applying criteria pertinent to an organisation; e.g., passenger projections, governmental plans; Physical capacity of a terminal; runway airport region etc. This may be a number of views e.g. capacity by geographical region; by airport; terminal etc. Other variables may be added depending on the view required. This may be finite or infinite i.e. it may provide a plan against finite resource constraints or it may provide a plan against unlimited resource constraints to ascertain the extent of imbalance. Performance Performance (measurement) is the process whereby an organization establishes the parameters within which programs, investments, and acquisitions are reaching the desired results. News A generic term including news concerning weather, alert, incident news, political news, and notice for airman. OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 14 of 17
  • 15. Person Person is a human being. Organisation Organisation is a group organised for a purpose. 4.3 Safety Safety has not been identified as a Business Concept, however is critical aspect of the overall ATM Enterprise environment, encompassing Organisations, People, Methods, Procedures, Processes and Technical Systems used, with the intention of finding critical safety risk areas. It is realted to the business concept Governance. The definition of Safety is - Absence of unacceptable risk(s). Safety is one Key Performance Area (KPA) and is coupled to the ATM performance based approach, in order to drive European ATM towards the the SESAR Vision. Societal Outcome (High Visibility): Safety, Security and Environmental Sustainability Operational Performance (Medium Visibility) : Cost Effectivness, Capacity, Efficiency, Flexibility, Redictability Performance Enabler (Low Visibility) : Access and Equity, Participation, Interoperability OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 15 of 17
  • 16. 5 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 5.1 Conclusions 1. Information requirements are normally captured in the operational view documentation (e.g. NAF v3 – Information View). The absence of such an artefact made it difficult to identify the key business information for the Airport Centric View. 2. The understanding of what was to be produced ie a CIM was not interpreted in a common way and as a result, the process was not as efficient as it could / should have been. 3. The time allocated for the development of the conceptual information model activity was under-estimated, and as a result, and as a result, the model is only a first attempt and reflects a glimpse of what should/can be included in an ATM conceptual information model for the Airport Centric View. 4. Both the EAEA proposed framework and the defence frameworks on which they are based (Modaf and NAF) are almost devoid of meaningful guidance on the use of a Conceptual Information Model. Specifically this can be illuminated under the following headings: • there is no guidance as to the level at which the Conceptual Information model should be produced relative to the Architecture Stack. It isn’t clear from any of the material whether this is a strategic view for the business or a reference view for the Information Architects, or indeed both; • the Defence Frameworks have strategically changed the positioning of Information Models within the frameworks adding to confusion concerning their production. The C.I.M. has actually been removed from the latest version of NAF. 5. The identification and articulation of the concepts being addressed within the problem space, significantly aids the understanding of all areas of the architectural work, regardless of the level being addressed or the work being undertaken. 6. Information Architecture has not been identified as a discipline within the frameworks currently used nor within the work undertaken under the TRS. 5.2 Recommendations 1. Elaborate a Generic Entity Framework which will support and structure a conceptual modelling process. This framework should be developed in an iterative way during the entire modelling exercise. 2. Make use of ICAO and IATA documents, which are agreed Regionally and Globally, as appropriate. 3. The Conceptual Informational Model should be documented in a formalised, standardised notation language showing the defined concepts and their relationships. OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 16 of 17
  • 17. 4. Clarify the level of Conceptual Information Modelling (C.I.M.) that is required to be undertaken for the Airport Centric View. 5. Clearly articulate the relationship between the Information views: it is not clear from the material either produced for the TRS or from the Defence Frameworks, other than that there must be a trace, which whilst true, is insufficient for the scale of activity anticipated as needed to be undertaken within future programmes. 6. Business concept modelling is a pre-cursor to production of architecture deliverables including Conceptual Information modelling. A Conceptual Information Model is required as a mandatory deliverable for future programmes. It would form a significant part of the collective memory for the Air Traffic Management Industry and will be a significant aid to the agreements necessary between stakeholders to address inter-operability; guide architects and inform Industry Support of the likely information requirements of programmes. 7. The following points must be answered: • Has Information Architecture been considered as being necessary to support future programmes? • If it has: under which auspices will the Information Architecture be produced? If it has not: what will provide the driver for the Information Management? • Is Information Architecture to be represented by Information Models alone, or, will it be a driver for the way in which the information requirements of a programme are articulated, disseminated and used – including the way in which data is eventually shared, stored, aggregated and created. This will be particularly relevant for the use of the SWIM enabler. Would this include clear definitions as to responsibilities for the things described above? In short: who is in control of what, under which circumstances and to which ends, to ensure that the information governance is controlled and transparent. 8. Clarify the level of Conceptual Information Modelling (C.I.M.) required to be undertaken. 9. Clearly articulate the relationship between the Information views: it is not clear from the material either produced for the TRS or from the Defence Frameworks, other than that there must be a trace, which whilst true, is insufficient for the scale of activity anticipated as needed to be undertaken within future programmes. 10. Business concept modelling is a pre-cursor to production of architecture deliverables including Conceptual Information modelling. A Conceptual Information Model is required as a mandatory deliverable for future programmes. It would form a significant part of the collective memory for the Air Traffic Management Industry and will be a significant aid to the agreements necessary between stakeholders to address inter-operability; guide architects and inform Industry Support of the likely information requirements of programmes OATA-MCS-12-05 , Edition: 3.01 Page: 17 of 17

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