INTEROPERABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE

The ICH Charter




                  Copyright © 2001 Interoperability Clearinghouse (ICH...
Table of Contents



Table of Contents.......................................................................................
ICH: A Business League of Enterprise Architects

The Interoperability Clearinghouse (ICH) was chartered in 1996 as a non-p...
Directions

ICH was created to be an independent architecture advisory for validated solutions. As such, we have
unique ch...
•   A means of dealing with inherent complexity of modeling enterprise solutions
•   A means of facilitating Government IT...
those who have implemented solutions and those who want to. IT organizations reduce risk by
    leveraging best practices ...
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ICH Charter

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Transcript of "ICH Charter"

  1. 1. INTEROPERABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE The ICH Charter Copyright © 2001 Interoperability Clearinghouse (ICH). All rights reserved. 8011 Washington Ave, Alexandria, VA 22308. Phone: (703) 768-4975. Fax: (703) 783-8461. Web: WWW.ICHNET.ORG.
  2. 2. Table of Contents Table of Contents.....................................................................................................................2 ICH: A Business League of Enterprise Architects......................................................................3 Goals..........................................................................................................................3 Vision..........................................................................................................................3 Guiding Principles........................................................................................................3 Directions.................................................................................................................................4 Enterprise Architecture Assurance......................................................................................4 Sharing Implementation and Integration Experiences...........................................................5 Developing and Leveraging Canonical Architectures...........................................................5 Resources to Support the ICH Mission and Assure Implementation Success........................6 Contact Information..................................................................................................................6 2 Copyright © 2001 Interoperability Clearinghouse (ICH). All rights reserved. 8011 Washington Ave, Alexandria, VA 22308. Phone: (703) 768-4975. Fax: (703) 783-8461. Web: WWW.ICHNET.ORG.
  3. 3. ICH: A Business League of Enterprise Architects The Interoperability Clearinghouse (ICH) was chartered in 1996 as a non-profit (501c6), public/private partnership with a mission to: “Promote mechanisms for assuring implementation success of enterprise solutions” Its unique organizational structure links government/industry enterprise users, IT product vendors, system integrators, standards groups, and research organizations. The ICH serves as a trusted intermediary among its member constituencies. The ICH is a low-cost/high-impact fee- for-service resource that is self-funding and free from profit motives and vendor bias. Goals The Interoperability Clearinghouse seeks to improve the capability of organizations to solve their business needs with commercial technology • Facilitate working groups to improve the understanding and success potential in difficult technological implementation areas that are critical to implementation success. (Examples could include; rate of change, complexity, interoperability, security, performance, etc., as the membership dictates.) • Provide high integrity collaboration mechanisms among traditionally “stove pipe” communities of interest in the IT value network; • Identify and/or augment architecture methodologies that foster alignment of commercial IT solutions with business drivers; • Facilitate the normalization and exchange of effective implementation best practices and lessons learned. • Establish an a true honest broker architecture advisory to manage risks in IT decision making Vision ICH will make a significant contribution to society by enabling and encouraging the following ends: • Helps identify meaningful, architecture independent solution frameworks for common industry domain problems; (eg. secure information infrastructures, enterprise application integration, wireless networks, ISP/ASP Platforms, data warehousing, data management infrastructure.) • Reduce IT project failures that are due to technology rate of change, system complexity, and architecture misalignments • Increase the integrity, timeliness, and contextual relevance of architecture communications between buyers and suppliers in development of enterprise solutions. Guiding Principles The ICH adheres to the following: • Transparency of motives and influences • Fosters the sharing of critical knowledge to support the mission • Information from the ICH is trustworthy, contextual, accurate, and timely 3 Copyright © 2001 Interoperability Clearinghouse (ICH). All rights reserved. 8011 Washington Ave, Alexandria, VA 22308. Phone: (703) 768-4975. Fax: (703) 783-8461. Web: WWW.ICHNET.ORG.
  4. 4. Directions ICH was created to be an independent architecture advisory for validated solutions. As such, we have unique characteristics that enable us to serve in the “trusted information broker” role. These include participation by industry, government, and academia; government-approved architecture processes; and policies for safeguarding the intellectual capital of all participants. To successfully operate in today’s Internet-driven world, IT organizations must find new ways to cope with continually changing business demands. Part of the solution is leveraging commercially available products rather than custom building solutions. This fundamental shift requires new approaches to satisfying enterprise business requirements in a timely, cost-effective manner. Two steps must be taken to adapt to this new reality: • Organizations must evolve their development and implementation methods to address complexity, to better communicate architectural needs, and manage risk. • Organizations must collaborate with their value chain participants to identify new opportunities and validate workable solutions. We must either cooperate or increase the failure rate. Based on these directions, and to fulfill the Mission Statement above, the ICH members will select areas of concentration and focus, form effective working groups and generate meaningful information and tools that can be used by the membership. In many areas, the ICH will also provide the expertise to the members to use those tools and information in the members organizations. This will be especially the case where detailed expertise, not generally available in the marketplace, is required for the members to be successful. Given this overall direction, the following are general areas, described in more detail below, where the ICH will concentrate: • Enterprise Architecture Assurance • Sharing Implementation and Integration Experiences • Developing and Leveraging Canonical Architectures • Architecture Services to facilitate transformation and implementation success Enterprise Architecture Assurance The Interoperability Clearinghouse provides (1) a proven enterprise architecture assurance methodology to enable the alignment of technology to business needs and (2) a neutral, collaborative venue to facilitate the exchange of implementation best practices (in terms of solution frameworks). ICH is committed to making IT Business solutions more agile and achievable, and to improving the economic use of resources in achieving these ends. ICH is a unique partner in advancing architecture assurance through improved architecture methods and collaboration. Good investments in IT are those that support strategic purposes and critical business operations— successfully, efficiently, and reliably. This requires taking an enterprise approach to first identify what is truly critical. Enterprise architecture assurance focuses on clarifying business imperatives and then obtaining the key information needed for selecting the most appropriate technology alternatives within the context of the particular organization. Thus, the integration of components needs to be done so as to maximize the performance and integrity of the entire system, not just individual parts. The ICH’s Architecture Assurance Methodology integrates existing guidance, methods and requirements for the development of enterprise solutions, including the following: • A means of removing bias and ambiguity out of the architecture vetting process 4 Copyright © 2001 Interoperability Clearinghouse (ICH). All rights reserved. 8011 Washington Ave, Alexandria, VA 22308. Phone: (703) 768-4975. Fax: (703) 783-8461. Web: WWW.ICHNET.ORG.
  5. 5. • A means of dealing with inherent complexity of modeling enterprise solutions • A means of facilitating Government IT Reform Initiatives: Government Paperwork Reduction Act, Clinger-Cohen Act, OMB Circular A119/A130, PDD63-Critical Infrastructure Protection Act, S803-E- Govt Act; • Proper application and utilization of Industry Architecture Methods: the Zachman Enterprise Architecture Framework™, OMG’s Model Driven Architecture, OSI’s Reference Model for Open Distributed Processing, IEEE 1471; • A means of leveraging Vendor Specific Frameworks such as; IBM’s Open Blue Print, Sun’s ONE, Microsoft’s .Net, • A means for utilizing existing Research Institutes: GWU Institute for Knowledge Management’s Enterprise Engineering/Knowledge Management framework, SEI’s CMM. It is a goal of the ICH to incorporate new requirements and offerings in the above categories when they become known, in accordance with the priorities of the members. Sharing Implementation and Integration Experiences One of the major benefits from a collaborative organization is the ability to share “what works” and “What works with what” among the members. To achieve that in the enterprise architecture arena, the ICH will be collecting and codifying several types of implementation experience. We will be the neutral body having no allegiance to other than our members and will be responsible for the appropriate integration and weighting of the information provided. Information from single sources such as vendors is important. But more valuable is a collection of information from multiple sources that independently confirms claims. ICH provides a process for integrating and weighting contributed information, including vendor claims. We collect no negative information, only positive. The more confirmation that a particular product performs well in certain functional or feature areas or integrates reliably with other products, the more confident a potential user can be in selecting that product as part of their business solution. All information collected and submitted contributes to the value that is passed on to others. With this resource, long-term IT decision-makers can make architectural decisions that will stand the test of time because they are based on the shared combinatorial successes of others. To support the architecture development process, those serving the needs of IT implementers must be free from conflicts of interest, which could bias recommendations. ICH’s business model avoids these conflicts and enables members to stay abreast of technology practices to make timely and sound decisions. Developing and Leveraging Canonical Architectures To provide a consistent, vendor neutral way of comparing architectural elements, the ICH through its working groups will develop canonical specification technology. These canonical specifications or “frameworks” will allow for comparison of IT products in a manner that abstracts out the marketing hyperbole that is frequently employed. The transformation of vendor specifications into these canonical models will allow enterprises to concentrate on what is meaningful to them, quickly. The frameworks that are developed are used in the assurance methodology above for comparison. In addition, the shared information is based on these frameworks, so these become key elements providing value to all the members, as described below. • Enterprise IT Organizations are primary beneficiaries of these frameworks. The ICH resources and knowledge base help users translate business requirements into interoperable solution sets. The way the information is captured and structured, places where particular combinations has been successfully implemented will be made available so detailed discussions can take place between 5 Copyright © 2001 Interoperability Clearinghouse (ICH). All rights reserved. 8011 Washington Ave, Alexandria, VA 22308. Phone: (703) 768-4975. Fax: (703) 783-8461. Web: WWW.ICHNET.ORG.
  6. 6. those who have implemented solutions and those who want to. IT organizations reduce risk by leveraging best practices and tapping success models. • Standards Development Organizations benefit by positioning their specification efforts into an enterprise framework. ICH provides a mechanism to link standards efforts to business drivers. • IT Product Vendors can provide their product information and experiences in a manner that they will be available to all the members and therefore, considered in the product selection efforts of the members. • Research and Testing Labs can share summary results that help in vetting enterprise architectures. ICH provides profiles of proven product capabilities to help in mapping validation needs to available validation resources. (This effort builds on the MCC VISTA Program, acquired by ICH in 1999. ICH directs 100% of testing requirements to VISTA partners.) • System Integrator/Solution Providers document implementation capabilities and successes for specific products. They can augment internal ICH research with validation data to help ensure the viability of proposed solution sets. Resources to Support the ICH Mission and Assure Implementation Success This is a new area for all the members of the ICH. While in time the methods and techniques pioneered by the ICH will become part of the practices of many of the members, the ICH will itself provide services to get the effort moving. We expect these services to be offered at competitive rates. They will always be focused on the newer aspects of what the ICH is doing, and will be targeted to the members. The full range of these services can not be identified a priori, but will include the following: • Consulting in the ICH Methodology(ies) and Tools • Training of organizations in the ICH Methodologies • Mentoring for members to provide additional depth in architectural and implementation methodology and practices • “Hot line” support for members • Assistance to members in architecture formulation using the ICH methodologies and tools to supplement their own capabilities • Assistance in testing and validating specific architectural combinations • Assistance using the ICH capabilities in procurement situations. Contact Information The Interoperability Clearinghouse is headquartered at: The Interoperability Clearinghouse 904 Clifton Drive, Suite 200 (703) 768-4975 (voice) Alexandria, VA 22308 (703) 765-9295 (fax) email: info@ICHnet.org public web: http://www.ichnet.org members web: http://members.ichnet.org (password protected) 6 Copyright © 2001 Interoperability Clearinghouse (ICH). All rights reserved. 8011 Washington Ave, Alexandria, VA 22308. Phone: (703) 768-4975. Fax: (703) 783-8461. Web: WWW.ICHNET.ORG.

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