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Federal Agency Strategies for Enterprise Architecture Management

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  • 1. Federal Agency Strategies for Enterprise Architecture Management Ground Systems Architecture Workshop 2004 Scott A. Bernard, Ph.D. Syracuse University School of Information Studies sabernar@syr.edu 1
  • 2. Overview • Purpose of Enterprise Architecture (EA) • Federal Agency Considerations • EA Guidance – Pre 2002 • EA Guidance – Post 2002 • Strategies for Moving to the FEA • Applying the FEA Reference Models • Integrating EA into Governance 2
  • 3. Purpose of Enterprise Architecture I. Improved Governance • Support the President’s Management Agenda (PMA) • Provide a citizen-centric focus • Address the increasing reliance on information technology (IT) II. Improved Management • Provide an enterprise-wide, business-based view of IT resources • Improve planning, implementation, and management of IT resources • Maximize the use of limited agency resources III. Improved Service Delivery • Move toward more flexible, capable IT operating environment • Improve IT requirements analysis capability • Improve security planning capability 3
  • 4. Federal Agency Considerations Mission Considerations • Customer and stakeholder expectations are rising • Increasing role for IT • Limited opportunities for multi-agency collaboration Resource Considerations • Limited funding available • Limits on trained personnel • Pressure to outsource / joint solutions • Continuing high Optempo EA Considerations • Completion of current EA framework (FEAF/TEAF/DODAF) • Migration to FEA and Reference Model approach • Integration with strategy, capital planning, project management 4
  • 5. EA Guidance – Pre 2002 Legislative Mandate: Clinger-Cohen Act Guidance: OMB A-11: Agency Budget, Strategic, and Performance Planning OMB A-130: Agency Management of Information Technology Resources Accepted EA Frameworks: Federal EA Framework (FEAF) Implementation via Zachman/Spewak approaches Treasury EA Framework (TEAF) DOD - C4ISR EA Framework Focus: Establish and maintain an EA program Document “as-is” and “to-be” views, a migration plan, and standards 5
  • 6. EA Guidance – Post 2002 Legislative Mandate: Clinger-Cohen Act E-Government Act Guidance: OMB A-11: Agency Budget, Strategic, and Performance Planning OMB A-130: Agency Management of Information Technology Resources Federal Enterprise Architecture Program Management Office (FEAPMO) Accepted EA Frameworks: Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) Focus: Maintain existing EA approach for intra-agency IT resource planning Implement the FEA and move toward multi-agency planning & e-Gov initiatives Reflect mostly FEA in Exhibit 300 submissions for FY 2006 6
  • 7. Strategies for Moving to the FEA • Promote IT alignment with agency strategic direction • Enable performance improvement • Support business transformation • Facilitate business case development • Enable results-oriented initiatives Performance Reference Model (PRM) Business and Performance-Driven Approach • Inputs, Outputs, and Outcomes • Uniquely Tailored Performance Indicators Business Reference Model (BRM) Interoperability / Information Sharing • Lines of Business • Agencies, Customers, Partners (Business-Context Driven) Service Component Reference Model (SRM) • Service Domains, Service Types • Business and Service Components Data and Information Reference Model (DRM) • Subject Areas, Classifications, Data Elements, • Data Properties, Data Representations Technical Reference Model (TRM) • Service Component Interfaces, Interoperability • Technologies, Recommendations 7
  • 8. Strategies for Moving to the FEA Specific mapping from the FEAF/DODAF to the FEA is to be determined Performance Reference Model (PRM) Business and Performance-Driven Approach Business • Inputs, Outputs, and Outcomes Architecture • Uniquely Tailored Performance Indicators Business Reference Model (BRM) Interoperability / Information Sharing ? Data • Lines of Business Architecture • Agencies, Customers, Partners (Business-Context Driven) Service Component Reference Model (SRM) Application • Service Domains, Service Types Architecture • Business and Service Components Te s Data and Information Reference Model (DRM) tem ch Technology • Subject Areas, Classifications, Data Elements, • Data Properties, Data Representations Sys nic Architecture al Technical Reference Model (TRM) • Service Component Interfaces, Interoperability • Technologies, Recommendations Operational 8
  • 9. Applying the FEA Reference Models Business Reference Model The Business Reference Model is a function-driven framework for describing the business operations of the Federal Government independent of the agencies that perform them. The Business Reference Model Version 2.0 provides an organized, hierarchical construct for describing the day-to-day business operations of the Federal government. While many models exist for describing organizations - org charts, location maps, etc. – this model presents the business using a functionally driven approach. The Lines of Business and Sub-functions that comprise the BRM represent a departure from previous models of the Federal government that use antiquated, stovepiped, agency-oriented frameworks. The BRM is the first layer of the Federal Enterprise Architecture and it is the main viewpoint for the analysis of data, service components and technology. 9
  • 10. Applying the FEA Reference Models Performance Reference Model Strategic Outcomes Mission and Mission and Customer Customer The Performance Reference Model (PRM) is a Business Business Results Results Results OUTCOMES: Mission and business-critical Results •Customer •Customer framework for performance measurement that •Services for Citizens •Services for Citizens Satisfaction Satisfaction results aligned with the Business •Service Coverage •Support Delivery of •Support Delivery of Services •Service Coverage •Timeliness & •Timeliness & Reference Model. Results measured from provides common application measures Services •Management of •Management of Government Resources Responsiveness Responsiveness •Service Quality a customer perspective. Government Resources •Service Quality throughout the federal government. •Financial •Financial •Service Accessibility •Service Accessibility It allows agencies to better manage the OUTPUTS: The direct effects of day-to-day business of Government at a federal strategic Processes and Activities Processes and Activities activities and broader processes measured level while providing a means for gauging •Financial •Financial •Productivity and Efficiency •Quality •Management & Innovation as driven by desired outcomes. Aligned •Productivity and Efficiency •Cycle and Resource Time •Cycle and Resource Time with the Mode of Delivery in the Business progress towards the Reference Model. target FEA. Technology Technology Other Fixed Other Fixed People People Assets INPUTS: Key enablers measured •Financial •Financial Assets through their contribution to outputs – •Employee Satisfaction & •Employee Satisfaction & Quality of Worklife Quality of Worklife Technology •Quality & Effic iency Technology •Quality & Effic iency •Financial •Financial •Recruitment & Retention •Recruitment & Retention •Information & Data •Information & Data •Reliability & Availability •Quality, Maintenance, & •Quality, Maintenance, & Efficiency and by extension outcomes •Employee Development •Employee Development •Reliability & Availability Efficiency •Employee Ratios •User Satisfaction •User Satisfaction •Security & Safety •Security & Safety •Employee Ratios •Utilization •Utilization Value 10
  • 11. Applying the FEA Reference Models Service Component Reference Model The Service Component Reference Model (SRM) is a business and performance-driven, functional framework that classifies Service Components with respect to how they support business and/or performance objectives. The SRM is intended for use to support the discovery of government-wide business and application Service Components in IT investments and assets. The SRM is structured across horizontal and vertical service domains that, independent of the business functions, can provide a leverage-able foundation to support the reuse of applications, application capabilities, components, and business services. 11
  • 12. Applying the FEA Reference Models Data Reference Model The Data and Information Reference Model (DRM) will describe, at an aggregate level, the data and information that support program and business line operations. The model will aid in describing the types of interaction and exchanges that occur between the Federal Government and its various customers, constituencies, and business partners. 12
  • 13. Applying the FEA Reference Models Technical Reference Model The TRM is a component-driven, technical framework used to identify the standards, specifications, and technologies that support and enable the delivery of service components and capabilities. The TRM provides a foundation to describe the standards, specifications, and technologies to support the construction, delivery, and exchange of business and application components (Service Components) that may be used and leveraged in a Component-Based or Service-Orientated Architecture. The TRM unifies existing Agency TRMs and electronic Government (e-Gov) guidance by providing a foundation to advance the re-use of technology and component services from a Government-wide perspective. 13
  • 14. Integrating EA Into Governance (FEAF) Current Architecture + Capital Planning Process Future Architecture The IT Capital Planning Process Business Plan $ Select Business S Architecture Create the Project Management Plan Review the Project for Funding Architecture S E Phase-1 Phase-2 E C Data The Project Management Plan Data C Architecture Architecture U A living document that is reviewed in every phase of the Capital U Phase-4 Planning Process Phase-3 R R Application Application I Architecture Evaluate Control Architecture I T Post-Implementation Review Post- Cost, Schedule, Performance T Y Technology Technology Y Architecture Migration Plan Architecture Technical Standards Current EA: Target EA: Capital Planning What we have now Board What we want to have CIO, CFO, Office Directors, The target Enterprise Architecture IT projects need a valid business Field Office Rep. documents the future IT/Business case and architectural alignment architecture in terms of where the agency to be selected for investment Capital Planning Architecture wants to be in 2-3 years. Working Group Working Group The underlying implementation framework is Zachman/Spewak 14
  • 15. Integrating EA Into Governance (FEA) Lines of Business Lines of Business Network Network Infrastructure Investment Portfolio Network Network Infrastructure PRM C 2 C Strategic Highest Infrastructure Updated Infrastructure O Level & View Network Goals Network Infrastructure O M Network Strategic Goals Network Infrastructure M BRM P P 1 Business Infrastructure O Improved Infrastructure O Network EA Business ProcessesNetwork N DRM EA Framework Processes N Network Infrastructure E Modernization Network Infrastructure E Information Infrastructure N Enhanced Infrastructure N Blueprint Network Flows Network Infrastructure T S Information FlowsNetwork Network Infrastructure T S SRM Support Infrastructure - Project Mgmt Integrated Infrastructure - Configuration Mgmt Network Network TRM S S Applications Support Applications UT UT - Standards -C -C Network Infrastructure Network Infrastructure SS SS 5 O O CR CR Lowest Network Infrastructure Optimized Infrastructure Level & View Infrastructure Network Infrastructure 6 Project Security Zone Mgmt Plans CURRENT FUTURE 3 ARCHITECTURE ARCHITECTURE 4 The Figure 1-3.implementation framework Documentation underlying Enterprise Architecture may need to change (i.e., EA³ Cube ™) 15
  • 16. Summary • Government transformation is occurring – PMA is guidance • Focus is on Executive Branch wide e-Gov initiatives that include DoD • The role of IT is increasing in delivering public services • EA approaches are changing – the FEA is emerging • Some agencies have narrower mission areas / others are expanding • Growing number of multi-agency initiatives • Limited resources, due to budget cuts and current ops • Seek out Joint and E-Gov opportunities – consolidation is coming • Make EA central to agency e-Gov strategies • Finish the FEAF/TEAF/DODAF and concurrently incorporate the FEA • Reflect EA in Exhibit 300s and Project Management Plans • Integrate EA into e-Governance 16

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