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Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology (BEAM)
 

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    Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology (BEAM) Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology (BEAM) Document Transcript

    • One World Information System Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology (BEAM) Http://one-world-is.com/beam Roy Roebuck (703) 598-2351 roy@one-world-is.com One World Information System (OWIS) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/1.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 559 Nathan Abbott Way, Stanford, California 94305, USA. Noncommercial use and extension of BEAM is allowed as described in this Creative Commons license. Commercial use of BEAM requires purchase of one or more types of low-cost BEAM Licenses for Service Provider, and Value-Added Reseller (VAR) BEAM use. BEAM licenses are available from One World Information System as indicated on a subsequent page of this presentation. 2/19/2004 5:17 PM The Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology (BEAM) is a public-licensable subset of the General Enterprise Management (GEM) methodology of One World Information System. What is the General Enterprise Management (GEM) methodology? GEM provides an integrated and continuously evolving “Table of Contents” and “Index” to your enterprise, as it is, was, and is intended to be. BEAM builds this enterprise Table of Contents and Index, and helps establish the GEM mechanisms which integrate them, use them for security management, expertise management, and situational awareness, and keep them up to date. Why use GEM? How many organizational Executives, Senior Managers, Managers, Workers, Staff, etc., wouldn’t like the right information they need to do their jobs well and make good decisions, to be provided to them in the way it is need, when it is needed. GEM can help your enterprise, whether Government, Commercial, Non-Profit, Community, or Individual, to attain just that capability. BEAM is a detailed procedure for defining an enterprise architecture that is intended to be conformant with the evolving U.S. Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) being defined by the FEA Program Management Office (PMO) of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB). BEAM predates and is a superset of the popular Zachman Framework for EA, the Spewak EA Planning methodology, and the DoD Architecture Framework. BEAM is intended to provide the foundation for full enterprise management, leveraging the BEAM extension of typical EA structure and content as the start point of an enterprise knowledge base. BEAM supports ISO 9000 Quality efforts in the enterprise, along with other “maturity” efforts such as the five maturity levels of Software Engineering Institute’s Software, System, Acquisition and other Capability Maturity Model (CMM) and CMM-Integrated (CMMI) efforts. BEAM specifically supports the ISO 9000 – Eight Quality Management Principles: 1. Customer Focus 2. Leadership 3. Involvement of People 4. Process Approach 5. System Approach to Management 6. Continual Improvement 7. Factual Approach to Decision Making 8. Mutually Beneficial Supplier Relationships Training and support on BEAM is available from One World Information System (OWIS) and licensed GEM Service Providers.
    • One World Presentation Outline Information System 1. BEAM Concepts 2. Executive Overview What are BEAM, GEM, and EMM and why are they valuable? GEM Facts/History and Claimed Benefits What are the costs of BEAM? 3. Technical Overview What is the BEAM process? 4. BEAM Procedures 5. Standards/Technology Supporting BEAM 6. Products Supporting BEAM 7. BEAM Implementation Project Plan Samples 8. BEAM Solution Scenarios 9. Summary 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • One World Information System 1. BEAM Concepts
    • One World BEAM Glossary Information System • Enterprise: A purposeful (i.e., goal seeking) endeavor. • Architecture: The orderly arrangement of parts within an endeavor. The structure of endeavor components and their interfaces, and the description and diagramming of this structure and its properties. • Capability: A talent or ability that has potential for development, deployment, and use/reuse. • Management: The purposeful resolution of complexity, inconsistency, and chaos in science, society, and perception into a system of controlled order. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam Here are some of the “common terms” underlying BEAM.
    • One World What and Why - Enterprise Architecture? Information System • What is EA: – Enterprise Architecture is: • An inventory of the identified “components” of an organization within its environment of customers, suppliers, authorities, and partners • A blueprint mapping the component relationships • Detailed descriptions of the components and relationships • A governance process to control the accuracy, timeliness, and fitness-to-enterprise-purpose of the component inventory and blueprint • Reference-to and/or use-of external component standards and categories in the blueprint when appropriate • Application of the EA as a top-level map for more detailed organization resource maps of IT, Facilities, Supplies, Services, Skill Sets, Funds, etc. • A mental map that everyone works from in their various enterprises – it’s usually not communicated fully or consistently with associates to improve coordination and collaboration • Why perform EA? – A formal (i.e., documented, shared, and controlled) EA is a sign of good, mature, and responsible management • EA is used for engineering of management • Management without EA is management as a craft – perhaps creating beautiful results, but not repeatable or easily maintainable • Would you build, rebuild, or renovate a house (i.e., your organization’s capabilities) without a blueprint? • Would you rather build/rebuild/renovate/maintain your house from common or unique components? • Would you rather have your blueprints maintained over time or redrawn from scratch any time a change was needed? – EA is mandated by OMB to support: • Clinger-Cohen Act (CCA) for IT resources • Federal Investment Budgeting (Exhibits 300 and 53) for any resource initiative • President’s Management Agenda (PMA) Enhanced eGovernment Initiative • Government Paperwork Elimination act (GPEA) • Government Performance and Result Act (GPRA) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 5 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • One World How Enterprise Architecture? Information System • How to perform EA – Follow OMB Federal EA Guidance where available (only 60% complete as of Sep 03) – Follow broad concepts provided by CIO Council extension to Zachman Framework (describing what EA is, but not how to perform it) – Fit EA activities within existing operations where possible to reduce duplicative and fragmented efforts to collect and organize EA data – Find, buy, or develop a procedure to walk the organization, its managers, and its workforce through the EA process that will consistently produce and maintain a FEA compliant enterprise architecture 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 6 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology – One World Information What and Why System • What is BEAM? – BEAM is a detailed workflow procedure to step the organization through a comprehensive EA development, operation, and maintenance process, as part of a larger workflow procedure for whole-organization life cycle management – BEAM is released under a public license for noncommercial use (e.g., free for non- outsourced use by government, academic and other organization) • Why use BEAM? – BEAM is the only full EA methodology (i.e., workflow procedure) available, commercially or otherwise – BEAM provides the means for simultaneous FEA, CCA, GPRA, GPEA, CMM/CMMI, and ISO-9000 compliance – BEAM supports all five government-wide initiatives of the PMA – BEAM is based on over two decades of operational research and experience in government and industry – Every typical medium to large organization is already performing the activities within the BEAM workflow – BEAM primarily organizes and integrates these activities’ operations, controls, and data – BEAM can be performed by internal resources and/or by commercial/contracted/outsourced resources 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 7 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology – One World Information How? System • How to use BEAM? – Register for free BEAM non-commercial use – Specify BEAM as your required EA methodology in your EA Contracts and Task Orders – Receive authorized training on BEAM or find a licensed commercial BEAM service provider – Assign or acquire technology to support BEAM – Implement a BEAM project for the first EA cycle (Example Project) • Site Survey Task – 1 month • Initial Business Architecture and EA Business Case Task – 2 more months • Full Business Architecture (BRM + PRM) Task – 2 more months • Full EA (BRM, PRM, SRM, DRM, TRM) Task – 4 more months – Implement recurring BEAM operations workflow for subsequent EA maintenance – Extend BEAM for other business function activities and applications • A76 sourcing studies • Feasibility Studies • Impact Analyses • Security Management (role-based asset distribution and access control, e.g., to support Sarbanes-Oxley Act, Information Assurance, Privacy Act) • Contingency Management • Continuity Management • Vulnerability/Risk Management • Knowledge management • Human Capital Improvement (Expertise Management, Expertise On-Call Collaboration, Skills Inventory, Skills Requirements, Training Management) • Budget/Performance Integration • Improved Financial Management and Reporting (Roll-up and Drill-Down to/from any level, for any subject/expense- element) • Enterprise Application Integration (Workflow, Web Services) • Enterprise Information Integration (Virtual databases, user-customized views of enterprise data) – GEM extensions of BEAM (Commercial Service and Support from licensed GEM Service Providers) • Integrated above BEAM extensions with enterprise Operations workflow based in dynamic enterprise intelligence – 8 more months after BEAM • Integrated enterprise Value-Chain (e.g., supplier/customer chain) workflow and real-time situational awareness - 8 final months for first GEM iteration • Continuing GEM operations workflow with dynamic intelligence 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 8 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • EA as Color By The Numbers – Consistency and Simplicity is One World Information Needed! System 1. Map the organization and its environment 1.1. Inventory, ID, and Arrange 2. Map the organization operations and resources Business 3. Perform and improve resource management and operations Functions, Organizations, and Locations 1 3.1. Perform 1.2. Identify and ID Function, Program, the Assignment of and Project Functional Activities Responsibility 3.2. Monitor, 2.4. Collect Assess, Report, 2.1. Inventory, ID, identified EA and Adjust and Organize information Performance Functional References, Data, Tools/Technology, and Standards 3 2.3. Inventory, ID, 2.2. Inventory, ID, and Organize 3.3. Monitor, and Organize Funded and Assess, Report, Goals, Objectives, Unfunded Plans for and Adjust Performance Recurring Enterprise Measures, and Operations and New Strategies 2 Initiatives 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 9 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam High Level BEAM Process Steps 1. Map the organization and its environment 1.1. Inventory, ID, and Arrange Business Functions, Organizations, and Locations 1.2. Identify and ID the Assignment of Functional Responsibility 2. Map the organization operations and resources 2.1. Inventory, ID, and Organize Functional References, Data, Tools/Technology, and Standards 2.2. Inventory, ID, and Organize Goals, Objectives, Performance Measures, and Strategies 2.3. Inventory, ID, and Organize Funded and Unfunded Plans for Recurring Operations and New Initiatives 2.4. Collect identified EA information 3. Perform and improve resource management and operations 3.1. Perform Function, Program, and Project Activities 3.2. Monitor, Assess, Report, and Adjust Performance 3.3. Monitor, Assess, Report, and Adjust Enterprise
    • What Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology Integrates and One World Information Why System BEAM Activity Extend and Customize BEAM for: FEA Strategic Budget and IT Business IT Security Human Plan Performance Architecture Process Capital Analysis Improvement 1. Inventory, ID, and Arrange Business BRM Y Y Y Y Y Functions, Organizations, and Locations 2. Identify and ID the Assignment of BRM, SRM, Y Y Y Y Y DRM, TRM Functional Responsibility 3. Inventory, ID, and Organize Functional BRM, TRM Y Y Y Y References, Data, Tools/Technology, and Standards 4. Inventory, ID, and Organize Goals, PRM Y Y Y Y Y Objectives, Performance Measures, and Strategies 5. Inventory, ID, and Organize Funded and PRM, TRM Y Y Y Y Unfunded Plans for Recurring Operations and New Initiatives 6. Collect identified EA information FEA Y Y Y Y Y Y 7. Perform Function, Program, and Project TRM Y Y Y Y Y Activities 8. Monitor, Assess, Report, and Adjust Y Y Y Y Y Performance 9. Monitor, Assess, Report, and Adjust Y Y Y Y Y Enterprise Why: BEAM Helps Identify and Reduce Duplicative Efforts, Reduce Inconsistency, Share Awareness/Knowledge/Information/Data, and Perform Parallel Improvements. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 10 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • One World BEAM Basics Information System Assertion: Something declared or stated positively, often with no support or attempt at proof. Simple Assertion An Assertion is two or more concepts Concept Relation (i.e., nouns/names for things you know) connected by their relations (verbs or verb Concept phrases). Joe has money. Mary is a consultant. A Semantic (Meaning) is a pathway of Deer eat grain. connections within an assertion. The Compound Assertion more complex the assertion, the more complex its semantics/meaning. R6 •Path R1, from C1 to C2 provides one meaning of the Assertion. R1 R2 R3 •Path R4, R3, and R6 from C1 to C2 C1 C2 C3 C4 provides a different meaning of the R4 assertion. R5 •The first path above might be false, while the second path might be true, or vice- versa. Deer/C1 eat/R1 costs/R2 •A single marked path, or a collection of grain/C2 money/C3 from/R3 them, through a compound assertion is a Mary/C4 are supported by/R4 semantic network. are fed by/R5 for/r6 Everything, from the largest to the Deer/C1 eat/R1 grain/C2 Deer/C1 Are Supported by/R4 money/C3 from/R3 Mary/C4 for/r6 grain/C2 smallest, is part of many compound assertions with many meanings. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 11 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam Paraphrased from http://www.knowledgemanager.us/KM-SemanticPaths-eng.htm: The fundamental elements of models, or any type of map representing perceived or factual reality, are concepts, their instances, and their relations (i.e., interfaces). Concepts (conceptual generalizations, events, named things, etc.) connected by their relations, form Assertions. The reticular (net-like resemblance) connectiveness of real, possibly-real, and non-real assertions forms the knowledge of a person or group. Thus, a model not only illustrates that two concepts are related, but identifies how these concepts are related. A proposition is a statement that affirms or denies something, and is an Assertion that is considered a truth. Other forms of Assertions are opinions, conjecture, speculation, contingencies, possibilities, etc., which may or may not represent factual knowledge.
    • One World BEAM Basics 2 Information System • Assertion: Something declared or stated positively, often with no support or attempt at proof. A data model or schema is the collection of properties within a semantic network. An ontology is a collection of semantic networks and data models about a subject which identifies the structure of the knowledge, meaning, and properties of the subject. An ontology is the structure or schema of a knowledge base, in the same way that a data model is the schema of a database. Subject Predicate Object Concept Types (GEM Categories Subset) (Concept Content) Relation Types (Concept Context) •Location •Category (e.g., Taxonomy) •Organization •Containment Concept Types •Organization Unit •Sequence •Function •Change (Past/Future) •Process •Reference •Resource •Alias Concept Properties Relation Properties 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 12 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam Additional information about the concepts and relations, their Properties, help to describe and identify the concepts and relations, and their behaviors. In Library and Information Science domains, the BEAM approach uses what is known as “faceted classification”, to enable dynamic and very rich description and linking between concepts.
    • One World Object Basics 3 – Four Comparable Assertion Structures Information System An ontology is the structure or schema of a knowledge base, in the same way that a data model is the schema of a database. The elemental structure of an ontology is the triple (i.e., subject/predicate/object, noun/verb/noun, component/relation/component. The standard for triples is called Resource Description Framework (RDF) Relation 1 Class1 C. Matrix Relation 1 Class 2 Class2 C2 Instance 1 C2 Instance 2 C1 R1 C2 R1 C2 C1 Instance Attributes Attributes Attributes Attributes C2 1 Attributes Attributes C1 Value C1 Value 1/1/2 C Attributes 1/1/1 Attributes L A. DLG R1 A C1 R1 C2 R1 C2 Instance Attributes Attributes Attributes Attributes Attributes S 2 S C1 Value C1 Value 1/2/2 Attributes 1/2/1 Attributes Class 1 (Table 1) 1 C1 R1 C2 R1 C2 Attribute 1 Attribute 2 Attribute 3 Instance Attributes Attributes Attributes Attributes 3 C1 Value C1 Value 1/3/2 Instance 1 Value 1.1 Value 1.2 Value 1.3 Attributes 1/3/1 Attributes Instance 2 Value 2.1 Value 2.2 Value 2.3 Relation 1 Assertion B. SQL Class 2 (Table 2) D. XML Class 1 Attribute 1 Attribute 1 Attribute 2 Attribute 3 Value 1 Class 2 Instance 1 Value 1.1 Value 1.2 Value 1.3 Attribute 1 Value 1 Instance 2 Value 2.1 Value 2.2 Value 2.3 Relation Attribute 1 Value 1 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 13 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam An Assertion can be represented as a directed labeled graph, (DLG) a matrix, and a parent/child table structure, among other means.
    • One World • Architecture Basics Architecture: The structure of an endeavor’s components and their interfaces, and the description Information System and diagramming of this structure and its properties. Structure Component 1 Interface 1 Component 2 Common Component and Interface Properties •Name •Unique ID •Description •Absolute Position •Create Date •Creator Unique ID •Modify Date •Modifier Unique ID •Deactivate Date •Deactivator ID Structure Properties Component 1 Specific Properties (Structure Metadata) Height Width Length Weight Component 2 Specific Properties Street Address City State Architecture Zip Code Interface 1 Specific Properties Ship Component 1 to Component 2 Delivery Date Delivery Cost Relation Forms: (Space, Matter, Energy, Time, Assertion) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 14 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam The structure is diagrammed using a “directed labeled graph” - DLG, shown here with the requisite minimum of two labeled-components connected with a single labeled unidirectional arrowed line. The properties of the structure are documented in a format now known as the “resource description framework” – RDF, established as a standard by the W3C. RDF is the foundation for object role modeling and data modeling used in semantics and data management, and for the ontology modeling used in knowledge management. The properties of the structure, including the diagram’s properties, are stored in RDF format, preferably in an RDF, or metadata, repository. This metadata repository can use XML, tabular, LDAP, or SQL technology. The recommended metadata repository storage technology is an XML database with the RDF storage schema implemented as the RDF-variant Managed Object Facility (MOF) schema, with MOF established as a standard by the Object Management Group. The MOF repository has the necessary flexibility to store, process, present, and maintain the continuously evolving schema and content of architectures and implementations.
    • One World Architecture Basics 2 Information System • Architecture: The structure of an endeavor’s components and their interfaces, and the description and diagramming of this structure and its properties. Structure Component 1 Link 1 Node 2 Node 1 Component 2 Interface 1 (I1) = N1+L1+N2 •Interface 1 provides Extraction of an asset of Value 1 through Node 1 of Component 1, Asset Transformation (to Value 2)/Transport/Transfer over Link 1, and Loading of that asset with its added transaction Value 2 through Node 2 of Component 2 (ETL), under change transaction rules. •ETL provides Exchange Transactions for Physical Assets and Interchange Transactions for Digital Assets Architecture Observations: •Architecture maps our perception of the world. •Engineering seeks to control the portion of the world’s mapped structure that we depend on. •Science seeks to identify and establish consistent controls on the portion of the world’s structure that we need to be reliable. •Everyone is an architect because they perceive and organize their own world view. Some architects have engineering discipline and skills. Some architects have scientific rigor and skills. •Architecture is observation, Engineering is applied theory, Science is reproducible proof of theory. •Engineering looks deeper into an architecture’s structure to identify and control the details of the sub-architectures’ structure. •All architecture, engineering, and science must be consistently communicated to have value. If it is not structured it cannot be engineered for reliability nor made consistent using science. Architecture Example: A ship and a dock are components of a port’s architecture. The ship (component 1) interfaces with the dock (component 2) via a tie-line (interface 1). The ship has a tie-down point (node 1) linking the ship to the tie-line. The dock has a tie-down point (node 2) linking the dock to the tie-line. The tie-line (node 1 + line 1 + node 2) performs some combinations of interface extraction, transformation, transport, transfer, and loading of some physical (e.g., force) and/or digital (e.g., signal) asset between the ship and the dock, and conversely over another or the same interface. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 15 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam Architecture is represented here in more detail, in relation to engineering and science. Architecture is presented here as a human trait for perceiving the world. Architecture’s value comes in communicating the perceived structures in a way that can be used as the start point for engineering and science.
    • One World Enterprise Architecture Basics Information System • A purposeful endeavor - an enterprise - can have an inventory of its known and approved components, but an inventory is not an architecture • Those inventoried components that have defined interfaces/relationships are the enterprise’s architecture, “As It Is” at the time of the component inventory and any interface identification • An intended or desired structure and its properties is an architecture “To Be” formed at some future time • A time-phased plan to introduce, modify, or eliminate components from the current enterprise As-Is inventory, with the corresponding introduction, modification, and/or elimination of relevant interfaces, to form the objective To-Be architecture, is an “Architectural Plan” to migrate the enterprise from its “As Is” to its “To Be” architecture • Architectural plans can be for a single component, a single interface, a single property, or multiple components, interfaces, and properties • Architectural plans are implemented as individual or collected projects and thus require project management controls (i.e., controls on production schedule, production budget, and product/service quality) with aggregation into programs, then into portfolios, and then into strategies 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 16 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • Open-Standard EA and IT Management Repository One World Information Elements System EA Tools IT Mgmt Tools Enterprise IT Common Architecture Design Rules Information Model Application Mgmt Data Mgmt via (Device, Network, Software, and via System and Common Database Configuration Software Design and Data Warehouse Integration Rules) Rules Design Rules Standard Object Repository Standard Object Model 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 17 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam MOF Repository, showing enterprise architecture and IT operation management components.
    • BEAM Improvement Management One World Information Environment Strategic and Business Plan (Future) System Program/Project Planning (Future) Program/Project (Current and •Function History) •Project Work Breakdown Structure •Functional Mission Detailed Planning, Tracking, and •Resource Breakdown Structure •Functional Vision Reporting to Supply Data on Daily •Organization Breakdown Structure •Functional Goals Management of Tasks: •Task/Organization Matrix •Functional Performance Measures •Events •Project Plan (Task, Milestone, Product •Functional Performance Strategies •Vulnerability/Risk Dependency, Critical Path) •Current Operations Analysis •Deliverables •Earned Value Management (Cost Variance, •New Initiatives •Activities Schedule Variance) •Alternate Improvement Paths •Action Items •Requirement and Constraint Specification •Improvement Path Economic Analysis •Milestones •Improvement Project Funding •Meetings •Incident Reports •Status •Labor Performance •Value Expectation and Requirement BEAM Integrated Web-enabled Management Repository Management •Object Repository (e.g., OMG XMI, CWM, CIM Schema) Management Scope •Deliverable/Product Status •SQL DBMS Enterprise •Web Server •Performance Metrics Function •Task Processes •PKI Registration/Certificate/Security Service Mission •Event Dates (Contractual and •PKI Authentication and Namespace Directory Service Vision Estimated Due, Start, End) •Directory Service (Namespace Categorization and Attributes) Goal •Architecture Modeling Service (Components, Relations, Descriptions, Objective and Change Tracking) Strategy •Messaging Service (e.g., Email, Application Integration, Web Service) Plan •Schedule/Calendar Service Project •Discussion/Conferencing/Collaboration Service Task •Document/Content Management Service •Change Management Service (Contingency, Plan, Current, History Event Change/Version Tracking) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 18 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This diagram illustrates the types of information required to manage such an improvement effort. The GEM methodology provides a solid foundation for managing this type of information and the corresponding activities. Projects directly linked to the organization mission and goals work with the information products in the boxes shown in the diagram, to manage the bolded elements in the strategic management scope outline. After the project is planned, the execution of the project requires detailed tracking, analysis, and reporting of events over time. This is necessary to identify and resolve variance from project budget (resource plan) or schedule (time plan). For project planning and tracking to be performed effectively and efficiently, especially in a distributed effort, technology that links the two management processes together must be made available and used.
    • Common information that business and IT One World Information workers would supply for BEAM. System Form 1: Is At Form 2: Contains Form 3: Employs Form 4: Implements Form 5: Enterprise <> Location <> Organization <> Workforce <> Function Contains Occupies Supports Performed By Applies Form 6: Uses/Creates Form 7: Satisfies Form 8: At Form 9: <> Process <> <> <> Resource Requirement Time/Event Activates Enables Constrains Schedule, Duration, Frequency, Change 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 19 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam The “facets” of information collected and organized by BEAM are illustrated here. Each of these facets represents the root of a hierarchical “catalog” of these types of things.
    • One World BEAM Form Templates, Part 1 Information System Form 3: Enterprise At Form 2: Location Contains Form 3: Related Organization Name: <> Geographic: <> Name: Chief Executive: Contains Postal Address: Occupies Chief Executive: Purpose: Residence: Purpose: Private: Business: Private: Personal: Public: Personal: Commercial: Other: Commercial: Public: Facility: Public: Commercial: Region Name: Commercial: Non-Profit: Spatial Coordinates: Non-Profit: Government: Solar: Optional Government: Geospatial: For GIS, Latitude: Mapping, Longitude: and CAD Altitude: Use Virtual: Telephone: Email: URI/Web: UNC/File: Database: Radio Frequency: 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 20 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam Example Enterprise, Location, and Organization class attributes and their primary relationships.
    • One World BEAM Form Templates, Part 2 Information System Form 4: Workforce Implements Form 5.1: Function Applies Form 6: Process Office: <> Name: <> Name: Position/Billet: Performed By Mission: Activates Standard: Team: Vision: Form 5.2: Assignment Role Role: Goal: Responsible Person: Input: Occupation: Measure: Authority Limits: Control: Grade: Strategy: Location Output: Plan: Organization Mechanism: Operations/Projects: Organization Unit Requirements Function Budgets Process Schedule Resource Quality Budget Operation: Budget Items: Maintenance: Functional Assessment: Form 5.3: Reference Sustain: Policy: Dispose: Process: Review: Procedure: Value Chain Assessment: Template: SWOT Assessment: Constraint: Strength: Metadata: Weakness: Data Required: Opportunity: Date Produced Threat: Tools: Materiel Required Materiel Produced: 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 21 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam Example Workforce (i.e., organization unit), Function, and Process class attributes and their primary relationships. Note that more detailed information collected and organized about function assignments, references, and plans.
    • One World BEAM Form Templates, Part 4 Information System Form 7: Resources Satisfies Form 8: Requirement At Form 9: Time Life form <> Resource <> Past Event: Fauna Flora Constrains Timeframe During Period: Information Schedule From: Unstructured Duration To: Semi-structured Frequency Chronology: Structured Change History Predecessor: Funds Change Projection Successor: Operation Quantity Present Event: Maintenance Investment Quality Period Skill Resource Life Cycle Began: Social Stage End: Business Process Chronology: Technical Process Stage Predecessor: Materiel Function Successor: Supplies Equipment Organization Unit Future Event: Facilities Organization Period Services Location Begin: Space End: Distance Chronology: Area Predecessor: Volume Velocity Successor: Acceleration Ongoing Event: Energy 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 22 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam Example Resource, Requirement, and Time/Event class attributes and their primary relationships. Note that considerable detail will be added the resource class as BEAM proceeds, to include specific types of resources approved for enterprise use, thus providing the content for an EA Technical Reference Model. The current and planned system specifications would be captured as requirements, while the schedule of the requirements would be captured in the Time/Event class.
    • One World BEAM Management Relation Matrices Information System 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 23 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam By asking the BEAM procedure’s questions in the order given, the tables shown at the top of this diagram are generated, representing relation matrices for the subjects of the questions. These populated relation matrices, when organized as a whole, related chain of subjects, provides a rich knowledge base of the enterprise as a whole. These same matrices provide the data necessary to generate the various information, products, and views specified by the various enterprise architecture frameworks (e.g., Zachman, FEA, DoDAF/C4ISR, TOGAF). Detailed attributes for each subject contain the majority of the subject detail, and both the subjects and their attributes are tailorable to each organization. GEM provides the mechanism to aggregate these subjects and their attributes, and privacy/security-appropriate data (e.g., knowledge instances) to enable the core GEM content distributed by OWIS to be increasingly refined over time, for all GEM users.
    • One World BEAM Management Simplified Entity Relation Diagram Information System 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 24 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This diagram represents the entity-relationship structure generated by organizing the BEAM Subject Relation Matrices into a relational database, or XML or Java class.
    • One World Information System 2. Executive Overview
    • One World What are BEAM, GEM, and EMM and why are they valuable? Information System • GEM = General Enterprise Management methodology • BEAM = Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology. A subset of GEM • EMM = Enterprise Management Maturity. A five level scale for identifying an enterprise’s level of management maturity, corresponding to the stages of fully implementing the GEM methodology • GEM is valuable because it enables an enterprise to perform its operations with dynamically updated internal and environmental intelligence • BEAM is valuable because it provides a step by step procedure, free for non-commercial use, to collect the information needed for satisfying the U.S. Federal and basic business requirements for an enterprise architecture, while providing recommended open-standard technologies for storing this information, while simultaneously forming the early stages of an enterprise knowledge base usable by the GEM methodology and its derived applications. • EMM is valuable because it enables an organization to rate their enterprise’s management maturity against the full Real-Time Enterprise management capability offered by fully following the GEM methodology, as well as providing the procedures, in stages, for implementing the GEM methodology, building/populating/integrating the GEM repository beyond the BEAM capability, and building/integrating GEM-based functional applications 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 26 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam GEM is a proven "management solution" framework that is the basis for consistent solution design and implementation. GEM is a generalization and integration of several processes present in all enterprise functions, and in all enterprise management, and is an improvement of processes that have been used for centuries. Through this integration, GEM provides a consistent method for analysis and integration of enterprise business, management, systems, value, and other subjects. The documentation of these analyses and integrations can be loaded into a multi-purpose knowledge- base which is part of the GEM design. The implementation of this integration results in knowledge-based value-chain workflow applications that reach across functional and enterprise boundaries. The concepts and designs behind GEM date back over 35 years to an early “connection model” extension to the popular “systems model”. The connection model was subsequently renamed a “generalized object model”. This early object model is comparable to today’s industry standard Object Metaschema defined jointly by the OpenGroup and Object Management Group (OMG) as the foundation for the structure and management of many modern information technologies. The GEM methodology, repository, and application design has been developed over the past 21 years as information technology has evolved over that period. GEM is designed as a method for simultaneously attaining enterprise management process and operation maturity, customer focus and value, continuous quality improvement, situational awareness, enterprise architecture, portfolio management, vulnerability management, etc., without all of the overhead required by each of these individual efforts. It is comparable to CMM for Software Engineering, and CMMI for System/Software Engineering and Acquisition Management, but for all organization functions, programs, projects, and processes.
    • One World Advantages of the BEAM Umbrella Information System BEAM can be used to support, integrate, merge, or eliminate • IT Architecture Management • IT Program, Project, Task, Event Management • System and Software Engineering Life Cycle Management • System/Software Requirement Specification Management • Requirement Management • Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of Requirements, Design, and Development • A76 Outsourcing Studies • Organization And Function Management (Staffing and Structure, Realignment, Reorganization, Relocation, Mergers, Acquisitions, Task Forces, BPR, etc.) • Quality Management (Six Sigma, TQM, etc.) • Maturity Management (e.g., ISO-9002, CMM, CMMI) • Human Capital Knowledge Management (i.e., Building individual and collective knowledge base, identifying skills available, identifying skills required, identifying skills gap, driving training management and recruiting) • Functional strategies, plans, and budgets tracked through to completion • Expenditures traced back to driving missions, goals, objectives, and strategies. • Reference Management (i.e., Policies, Processes, Procedures, Templates, Standards, Tools) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 27 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • BEAM Business Intelligence Capability Uses EA for One World Drill Down and Roll Up of Budgets, Priorities, Information System Performance, Production Levels Functions and Uses of the Drill Down and Roll-Up Features of BEAM: • Asset Distribution Requirements • Asset Access Control and Information Requirements • Summaries, aggregations, and details concerning Business Functions, Priorities, Budget • Gives the ability, as a business intelligence technique, to explain to anyone (e.g., Congress, OMB) the impact of funding changes (e.g., if you budget this agency XXX dollars you will get these outputs from our mission area in these quantities, in these time frames, with these qualities, etc., as in GPRA support.) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 28 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • GEM Facts/History and Claimed Benefits One World Information System Facts/History Claimed Benefits GEM, and to a large degree its BEAM subset, has been proven by • GEM provides a methodology, i.e., a detailed set of over two decades of day to day practical use, including: procedures supported by a variety of open-standard 1. Re-justifying and reorganizing a 16,000 person U.S. Army technologies, for developing and implementing management command assigned to NATO solutions, regardless of the subject being managed 2. Mapping together job functions, positions, skill sets, IT • BEAM provides a single procedure to simultaneously support: requirements, organization units, facilities, training, and – Enterprise architecture (As-Is and To-Be Architectures budgets for organizational productivity improvements and IT and Migration Plans) acquisitions based on enterprise-wide business patterns – A76 competitive sourcing studies 3. Modeling and building an application to provide wartime and – Staffing, structure, and equipping studies contingency operational scenario generation, event release for – Reorganization/realignment/relocation projects execution, and performance tracking – Functional and enterprise knowledge modeling (for 4. Modeling and managing the garrison IT architecture for a leveraging and enriching Human Capital) 300,000 person Theater Army – Strategic management and performance management of strategic plans/portfolios and 5. Managing IT requirements in conformance with that enterprise budgets/programs/projects architecture – Business process reengineering (BPR) 6. IT planning, programming, and budgeting for that Theater – Business process maturation (e.g., supporting ISO Army 9000, and CMMI and CMM at all maturity levels) 7. Adoption of that methodology, and the application that applied • GEM provides the procedural steps beyond BEAM to provide: it, as a candidate standard Army management system for – Enterprise modeling and management managing IT architecture, plans, and execution – Enterprise Knowledge Management 8. Inclusion of the management methodology’s knowledge – Enterprise Workflow schema in a standard DoD application combining SQL, GIS, – Enterprise Application and Information Integration and CAD functions for IT architecture, infrastructure, and (EAI/EII) systems planning and topological display – Security Architecture and Management 9. Serving as the management methodology in supporting – Enterprise Resource and Requirements Management engineering management for the DoD Common Operating – Enterprise Situational Awareness and Managed Environment (COE) and Global Command and Control Intelligence System (GCCS) – Integrated Enterprise Operations based on Dynamic 10. Providing the operational model and analytical schema to Enterprise Intelligence identify the traffic and usage patterns of the DoD Joint Operations Planning and Execution System (JOPES) for use in its redesign. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 29 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • What are the rough costs of BEAM? One World Information System • For non-commercial (e.g., government, FFRDC, Academic, individual, community) and internal organization use there is no charge to use the BEAM. (Register for BEAM use, including any of your extensions to BEAM, under the same Creative Commons license, by sending an email to BEAM- Use@one-world-is.com). If Contractors without BEAM commercial licenses are used to deploy BEAM internally or in other organization units of a larger organization, then the initially registering organization must purchase appropriate commercial BEAM licenses from BEAM-License@one-world-is.com. • The BEAM methodology does not introduce significant new work to the typical medium to large organization, but does change the way existing information about the organization and its environs is collected, shared, organized, applied, and maintained. BEAM provides an engineered approach to enterprise architecture as a substitute for the more typical non-repeatable "craft" approach to EA. These changes may involve added costs, which would predictably be offset by increases in productivity, responsiveness, and accuracy of the resultant BEAM-supported work. • BEAM costs for commercial and non-profit licenses are shown in the table below. This would include providing contracted BEAM support to other organizations, and other non-commercial uses. • To make payment, click on the hyperlinks in the table below, or contact BEAM-License@one-world-is.com or +1 (703) 598-2351, to make other payment arrangements. • To download BEAM documentation, project plan, and view lists of Licensed BEAM Supporters and VAR, visit http://one-world-is.com/BEAM. BEAM Annual Licenses for Commercial and Non-Profit Organizations BEAM annual VAR license cost varies with inclusion of BEAM in Individual, Small team, Community, and Corporate commercial products or commercial methodology use. 2.1 Single User Software using BEAM $ 200.00 2.2 Small Team Software using BEAM $ 400.00 2.3 Community Software using BEAM $ 1,000.00 2.4 Other Methodology or Corporate Software using BEAM $ 5,000.00 BEAM Commercial Service Provider Annual License Cost: BEAM Operations Scope and Multiplier x License Type Multiplier Qnty Cost 3.1 City, Metro-Area, or County 50 Formal Organization $50 1 $ 2,500.00 3.2 State 100 Formal Organization $50 1 $ 5,000.00 3.3 National 1,000 Formal Organization $50 1 $ 10,000.00 3.4 Global 10,000 Formal Organization $50 1 $ 20,000.00 BEAM Practitioners are available on hourly or retainer basis. Contact Beam-Labor@one-world-is.com. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 30 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • One World BEAM for EA Governance Information System Enterprise --- --- Operations --- Map Organization, Environment, Operations, and Spiral Resources (i.e., Document and Maintain Enterprise Architecture) Strength, Weakness, • Mission/Vision Opportunity, and Threat • Goals (SWOT) • Performance Objectives Assessment, • Performance Targets/Indicators Risk Assessment, and Develop Strategies Vulnerability Recurring Operations Management --- --- --- Initiatives (Projects) --- --- --- Implement Strategies Perform Projects --- --- --- Measure Project Performance Value Chain Review Strategy Performance Assessment Adjust Performance --- 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 31 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam BEAM enables the enterprise to resolve many of its toughest EA problems through the implementation of its integrated repository. This diagram illustrates the major enterprise and functional management activities supporting a BEAM environment, as a closed loop system. The dashed elements of the diagram represent GEM components, outside of the BEAM scope.
    • One World GEM Function – Enterprise Intelligence Information System Next State (Order) Response Decision Management Impact Focus Awareness Learning Knowledge Process IT Focus Information Metadata Increasing Data Pattern Operation and Intelligence Performance Signal Focus Indicator Event Change Increasing Context Current State (Order) (=Decreasing Disorder) GEM Intelligence Categories (i.e., Facet Classification) Give Context To The Subject GEM GEM Subject Assertions (Fact, Opinion, History, Conjecture, Projection, Plan, Theory, Subjects etc.) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 32 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam In GEM, Enterprise Intelligence is a collection of those sensed, perceived, and recorded things, treated as resources, that guide enterprise decisions for in responding to changes in monitored situations. These intelligence resources are best managed as a whole, thus providing integrated assertions (e.g., facts, opinions, contingencies, requirements) for decisions and response. GEM categorizes and structures its intelligence in terms of the basic human questions and answers of: where, who, what, why, how, when, how many, how often, for how long, of what quality, at what stage, etc. The intelligence categories of GEM are named: Location, Organization, Organization Unit, Function, Process, Resource, and Requirement. GEM is used to collect, identify, describe, relate, control, and disseminate information about subjects in these categories.
    • BEAM Function – Migrating from As-Is to ToBe One World Information System 1 3 2 Where we are today… How we’ll get there Where we want to go… (As-Is) (Migration) (To-Be) Risk Assessment, Performance Measurement, Mission Operating Environment And Adjustments Evolving Strategy Value-Lattice (Adaptation Decisions) Vision (Integrated Value Chains) Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Goal and Threat Awareness Objective Criteria Tightening “Acceptable Performance” Indicators from Lessons Learned During Operations (Intelligence Refinement) BEAM provides a procedure to move from problems to solutions. BEAM enables accomplishment of architecture goals and objectives. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 33 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam Management: The purposeful resolution of complexity, inconsistency, and chaos in science, society, and perception into a dynamic system of relative controlled order. The movement from Current Problem to Solved Problem, or from As-Is situation to To-Be situation. An enterprise is a “purposeful endeavor”, and thus can include the purposeful (e.g., goal-oriented) endeavors of nations, collections of nations, organizations, chains of formally and informally linked organizations, markets, communities, groups, and/or individuals. Each of these endeavors has an As-Is “architecture” at some degree of completeness. Part of enterprise architecture is defining how to move an enterprise’s As-Is architecture, and the infrastructure and systems described by that architecture, “from here to there” in a purposeful way. This entails knowing: 1) where you are, 2) where you want to go, 3) what path and pace you want to follow, 4) how you’re progressing on the path and pace, and 5) what adjustments are needed to these. This goal-seeking approach resembles, and is a superset of, the operations-planning approach used by many organizations. It supports and can enable automation of large enterprise management controls such as compliance with the U.S. Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) and Information Technology Management Reform Act (ITMRA, also known as Clinger-Cohen Act – CCA), and automation of management endeavors such as the 2001 U.S. President’s Management Agenda with its five key government-wide initiatives (Strategic Management of Human Capital, Competitive Sourcing, Improved Financial Performance, Expanded Electronic Government, Budget and Performance Integration). BEAM can provide an integrated mechanism to support these controls and can thus directly support the Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA).
    • BEAM Supports the FEA and the PMA One World Information System BEAM Methodology Structure President’s Management EA Agenda Hierarchy B D A T A A A A Government Performance and Results Enterprise Architecture Act (GPRA) (1993) X President’s Goals (2001) X President’s Mgt Agenda X Five Government-Wide Initiatives Business X Data (Scorecard Items) Architecture Architecture 1. Human Capital / CHCO X X X X 2. Competitive Sourcing / A76 X X X X 3. Financial Performance / BMMP X X X X Technology Application Architecture Architecture 4. Enhanced eGovernment X X X X • 24 eGov Initiatives X X X X GEM Methodology Structure • FEA in support of Clinger X X X X Cohen Act • Federal Information Security X Mgt Act 5. Budget/Performance X X X X • OMB PART Scorecard X FEA = Federal Enterprise Architecture PMA = President’s Management Agenda BA = Business Architecture (FEA BRM/PRM and DoDAF OV Conformant) CHCO = Chief Human Capital Officer DA = Data Architecture (FEA DRM and DoDAF OV Conformant) BMMP = Business Management Modernization Plan AA = Application Architecture (FEA SRM and DoDAF OV Conformant) PART = Performance Assessment and Rating Tool TA = Technology Architecture (FEA TRM and DoDAF TV Conformant) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 34 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam BEAM directly supports the U.S. President’s Management Agenda (PMA) initiative of “Enhanced eGovernment” and its FEA efforts. The commercially available GEM methodology supports the more comprehensive requirements of the full PMA. Through internal capabilities and teaming and/or GEM licensing arrangements with best of breed management and technology service providers, OWIS provides a full spectrum of Services for managing an organization and its enterprise architecture. We are willing and able to team with your existing contractors in all categories of service, such as planning and implementing BEAM in your organization, or to license GEM to you or them. BEAM can be directly applied to help achieve the expected results of the President’s Management Agenda, as shown in this diagram. At the heart of the BEAM support for the PMA initiatives is a FEA conformant enterprise architecture, satisfying the EA portion of the “Expanding eGovernment” PMA initiative, with extensions into infrastructure and system development and operations that encompasses the DoD Architecture Framework (DoDAF). To build the EA, BEAM efforts collect and organize the Business, Data, Application, Technology, and Security Architectures, with mapping to existing and planned infrastructure and systems. BEAM provides the structured basis for effectively, efficiently, and securely building and using enterprise applications. With the EA in place, the management solution for the other PMA initiatives, and other management initiatives, is greatly simplified. The BEAM Business Architecture, often in conjunction with the Security Architecture, is the most commonly used area of the BEAM- derived Enterprise Architecture. They provide the detailed system and requirement analyses used in defining the data, application, and technology architectures and in implementing subsequent information system capabilities.
    • Supporting The President’s Mgt Agenda (PMA) One World Information GEM-Based Management Support and IT Services System GEM For Enterprise Management Services Target Service PMA Initiatives • Extending BEAM into Full Enterprise Engineering and Real-Time Enterprise (Simultaneous Support) Audience • Operations and Intelligence Management Workflow • Performance/Quality/Cost Improvement 1. Human Capital • Cycle Time Reduction • CHCO • Vulnerability/Security/Continuity/Risk Management • CEO • CHCO • Knowledge Management • COO 2. Competitive Sourcing • CKO • Multimedia Knowledge and Content Integration • CFO • CIO • A76 • Functional Managers • Expertise Location, Collaboration, Notification, Certification, and Development 3. Financial Performance • GEM Intelligence for: • BMMP 4. Enhanced Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology (BEAM) eGovernment • CFO Consulting-On, Implementing, and Extending: • CIO • 24 eGov Initiatives • CTO • FEA / NASCIO • TOGAF • Zachman • FEA • DoDAF/C4ISR • Spewak • Portfolio Management • FISMA • Organization Studies (Outsourcing/A76, Realignment, 5. Budget/Performance Reorganization, Relocation, Cultural and Political Change) Integration IT Services • Scorecard • LAN/WAN/Wireless Network Management • Application and Database Integration • Complex Databases, Data Warehousing • CIO • Web-based Applications • CTO • System/Software Network Infrastructure Services Development Mgrs •IP, Telephony, VOIP, Satellite, Wireless, Radio •Provisioning, Prioritization/Precedence, and Quality Management 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 35 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam From top to bottom of the above service stratum: 1. OWIS provides commercial Enterprise Management Services and Support using our GEM methodology, implemented in value-producing phases using our Enterprise Management Maturity model. 2. GEM includes BEAM, the Public-Licensed EA methodology from OWIS, within its larger methodology for managing the intelligence and intelligence-based operations of any enterprise. BEAM is a methodology, supported by appropriate technology, for developing, maintaining, and leveraging enterprise architectures. BEAM is provided as a public license to enable those working with the FEA and/or TOGAF to have a common starting point for defining EA terms, procedures, and products, thus helping the government clients and their EA providers to begin to reduce the uncontrolled variation in EA approaches into a common approach. Following the BEAM provides the map or "blueprint" of the enterprise components and their interfaces. BEAM also provides the resultant "inventory" of enterprise resources/assets at their various life cycle stages, and links those resources to the "architecture" of processes, functions, organization units, organization, and locations relevant to the enterprise. In doing this, BEAM extends Enterprise Architecture capabilities far beyond those provided by FEA/FEAF, DoDAF/C4ISR, TOGAF, Zachman, Spewak, etc. Through use of the more comprehensive and structured BEAM methodology, we provide Enterprise Architecture services and support, having the ability and readiness to work with: Other EA frameworks (e.g., Zachman, DoDAF/C4ISR, FEA, TOGAF, etc.) and EA methodologies (e.g., Spewak), data, application, and architecture modeling tools (e.g., Computas Metis, Agilense Web Modeler, Popkin System Architect, Rational Rose, Ptech, Poseidon UML, Oracle Designer, Microsoft Visio for Enterprise Architects), metadata (model) repositories Open Standard (MOF, Agilense EA Repository, Netbeans MDR, DSTC), Proprietary (Metis, CA/Platinum ModelMart, ASG Rochade, Cyrano, Softlab Enabler, Oracle, Microsoft, Rational ClearCase, ISC E-GEN/MAP, Sybase Metaworks) middleware products (workflow, metadata management, metadata integration, ETL, etc.) 3. We provide full life cycle support for EA-governed system and software capabilities through our award-winning IT service capabilities, and by teaming with other high quality companies. 4. We provide network infrastructure services, such as data and voice telecommunication services and support, through our teaming with high quality network service providers.
    • One World GEM™ and Enterprise Management Maturity Levels Information System EMM Level 5: Real-Time Enterprise Management Growing the Capability Tree EMM EMM 2 EMM 3 EMM Level 4: Enterprise Operational Management 1 EMM Level 3: Enterprise Architecture (BEAM) EMM Level 2: EMM Level 2: Functional Functional EMM 4 EMM 5 Architecture X Architecture Y EMM Level 1 EMM Level 1 System System Architecture A Architecture C EMM Level 1 EMM Level 1 System System Architecture B Architecture D GEM can begin at any level of the enterprise and grow outward, but starting with the whole enterprise is recommended. GEM provides escalating levels for building and integrating a mature enterprise management capability. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 36 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam The EMM process has five levels for deploying the capabilities enabled by the General Enterprise Management (GEM) methodology. As illustrated here, the GEM methodology can be applied at multiple levels of the enterprise, but the enterprise only gains a “whole-enterprise” view starting at EMM Level 3, through the application of EA, preferably using BEAM. GEM is applicable at all levels of the enterprise capability (e.g., from isolated system to “living” enterprise), but the enterprise gains the most value, in the shortest overall time, at the lowest overall cost and complexity, by pursuing EMM 3 through 5 in sequence. An analogy to help understand the EMM levels of GEM comes from medicine. EMM Level 1 is equivalent to the anatomy and function of a human’s finger. EMM Level 2 is equivalent to the anatomy and function of a human’s arm. EMM Level 3 is equivalent to the anatomy and function of a human body. EMM Level 4 is equivalent to the physiology and mechanical operations of a human body, which both apply the anatomy. EMM Level 5 is equivalent to the psychology and awareness, the intelligence, of the human, which applies the body’s anatomy, physiology, and mechanics. Stretching that same analogy a bit further, an organization with an enterprise architecture, such as one provided at EMM Level 3, is basically an anatomically modeled organization, much like a cadaver serves as a model of a human. EMM Level 4 is much like a human in a coma – operating but not aware, proactive, or reactive. EMM Level 5 is much like an aware and active human operating in their dynamic environment.
    • One World Implementing GEM™ Using EMM™ Information System Advanced Services Outcome/Results • Business Case for Full EA (EMM 3) and GEM (EMM 4 and 5) • BEAM Business Analysis • Partial EA (Extending FEA BRM into initial Functional Knowledge Base) • Initial Security Architecture (Role basis for asset access and distribution) (GEM only) (Partial EMM 3) • BEAM Enterprise • BRM, PRM, DRM, SRM, and TRM for FEA-Conformant EA Architecture • • Full Security Architecture (Full Role-Based Access Controls) (GEM only) Initial Vulnerability (Operation Value, Continuity, Risk) Modeling (GEM only) (Full EMM 3) • Enterprise Portfolio Analysis • Initial Physical and Digital Asset Management (GEM only) • Enterprise Model and Value Chain Maturity (GEM only) • Functional Knowledge Base (GEM only) • Guidance Inventory • Guidance Integration (GEM only) • Integrated Operational • Mature Operations and Integrated Workflow • Metadata Management for Enterprise Application Integration and Virtual Enterprise Database Management Capability • Enterprise Portfolio Management (EMM 4) • Detailed Physical and Digital Asset Management • Vulnerability Management • Leverages EA for Performance Mgt, Configuration Mgt, Security Mgt, etc. • Continuously Updated Management Dashboards • Reference Architecture (Functional Maturity) Support • Semantic Models • Situational Awareness for Leaders and Workers • Fastest Decision and Response Cycles • Real-time Enterprise • Command and Control Management Capability • Dynamic Enterprise Intelligence, Operations, Value-Chain Workflow, and Value-Lattice Visualization • Enables Complex Change Management (EMM 5) • Mature Culture • Enterprise Ontologies and Dynamic Knowledge Management 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 37 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam OWIS is prepared to support your organization and your contractors in applying the GEM methodology to your enterprise management operation and reporting requirements. This diagram represents our primary GEM-related services. •What are EMM/GEM durations (for most Federal Departments/Agencies, State and Local Government Departments, and medium to large commercial organizations)? GEM operates in spiral management life cycles, with each subsequent cycle operating from the refined results of the previous cycle. These GEM/EMM stage estimates are cumulative durations, not additive (i.e., Level 4.2 takes approximately three months added on to the 12 months of a Level 4.1 task, yielding an approximate 15 months total). •A GEM/EMM Site Survey takes approximately 2 weeks. It provides the necessary information to establish the scale of the GEM/EMM effort, the technologies, methods, models, and notations currently in place, and the organizational context of the GEM/EMM effort to help establish the parameters for the Change Management (i.e., communication plan, etc.) process that runs in parallel with the GEM/EMM implementation activities. The Site Survey helps to determine the costs of the EMM efforts within the estimated timeframes below. •EMM Level 1 services take approximately 2 months per system. Note that multiple Level 1 services within a single function would never yield the same benefit as a Level 2 service for that function and all of its systems. •EMM Level 2 services take approximately 4 months. Note that multiple Level 2 services within a single enterprise would never yield the same benefit as a Level 3.3 service for that enterprise and all of its functions. •EMM Level 3.1 – BEAM Initial Business Architecture services take approximately 3 months, yielding a portion of BEAM functionality. •EMM Level 3.2 – BEAM Full Business Architecture services take approximately 5 months, yielding a portion of BEAM functionality. •EMM Level 3.3 –BEAM Enterprise Architecture services take approximately 9 months, yielding a portion of GEM functionality with FEA and C4ISR/DoDAF conformance. •EMM Level 4.1 – Operational Enterprise Architecture services take approximately 12 months, yielding a portion of GEM functionality. (EAI) •EMM Level 4.2 – Dynamic Enterprise Management services take approximately 15 months, yielding a portion of GEM functionality. (Workflow) •EMM Level 5 – Real-time Enterprise Management services take approximately 24 months, yielding the full GEM functionality. (Value-Chain Workflow, Situational Awareness) •Who can benefit from BEAM and EMM/GEM? Any organizational executive, manager, workforce members, singly or in groups, and their customers, suppliers, authorities, partners, and the relevant public constituency. •What are the benefits of BEAM and EMM/GEM? Shared and maintained knowledge based on common terminology, meaning, and understanding, as appropriate by the attained EMM Level. Increased operational capability, effectiveness, efficiency, adaptability, and responsiveness. •What is the cost of BEAM and EMM/GEM? Cost of infrastructure to support BEAM/GEM (network, repository platform, repository software, client platform, client software, training on these, maintenance of these). Cost of initial and ongoing organizational and functional analysis. Cost of interfacing organizational and functional knowledge with legacy information systems, Web, Semantic Web, Web Services, etc. •Where are BEAM and EMM/GEM performed? BEAM/GEM would operate using a technical platform distributed over the organization’s intranet, private networks, and Internet. •When are BEAM and EMM/GEM performed? GEM is performed continuously once begun, operating as a core process within its adopted organizations. •What are the BEAM and EMM/GEM frequency? An EMM Level, once reached, would require consistent use and maintenance to sustain its value and capability. BEAM/GEM use would be by your organization’s personnel and/or its OWIS support team. The BEAM and EMM/GEM maintenance could be performed by OWIS and/or by your personnel trained in the EMM/GEM techniques and tools.
    • BEAM Spiral Life Cycle Support for Standards, Regulations, and Legislation One World Information System 5. Strength, Weakness 5. Customer Satisfaction 5. Other Business Function Opportunity, Threat 5. Function Satisfaction 5.. Personnel Function 5. Marketing Function 5. Facilities Function 5. Logistics Function 5. Finance Function GPRA 5. Function Operation 5. Business Requirements Performance 5. Function Information 5. Business Case, Products Technology, Standards, R&D 4. Function Systems 4. Infrastructure ITMRA/Clinger-Cohen Act 4. Capability Provisioning 4. Enterprise Architecture 4. Functional Foundation 3. Requirements Management Zachman, FEA, TOGAF EA 3. Process Management (Workflow) 3. Process Maturity DoDAF/C4ISR EA 2. Business Function Plans 2. Enterprise References and GPRA 2. Strategic Management Reference Maintenance 1. Enterprise Context Inventory 1. Enterprise View 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 38 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This figure illustrates the life cycle of enterprise management information resources. An enterprise model, showing the inventory of managed objects within the enterprise, provides a mapping for subsequent management activity. By building a management capability from an enterprise model, you gain the ability to manage the context of the enterprise as a whole. This provides the mechanism for situational awareness, knowledge-based activities, and process (supply chain, value chain) optimization.
    • One World Information System 3. Technical Overview
    • What is the BEAM process? One World (BEAM – EA Capability Management Stages Preceding GEM) Information System BA DA AA TA Infrastructure Application Software Content and Customers, Business, (BRM/P (DRM) (SRM) (TRM) (GEM) Platform (GEM) Performance and Investment RM) (GEM) (GEM) (GEM) SA Certification and Accreditation (GEM) (GEM) (e.g., DITSCAP Definition, Verification, Validation, Post-Accreditation Activities) Enterprise Architecture and System/Software Engineering (i.e., Detail Design) and Operation System/Software High Level Architecture IT Capability Management Stages Business Service (Component) Definition (Reusable solution set) Technology Architecture Function Technology Business Architecture Data Architecture Applications Architecture •TRM Services Category Function Function Data Function Logic –Mapped to Runtime Patterns •References •Domain •Application and Business •TRM Approved Service –Policy –Subject Area Component Catalog Category Products •Process •Subject –Feature –Procedure –Attributes –Mapped to Runtime Products •Behavior »Templates –Constraints –Benefit •Request TRM Waiver »Rules –Structured Content »Cost »Standards •SQL, LDAP •Request new Application or –Vocabulary -> Knowledge –Semi-structured Content Component •Mission Operations •XML, Messages •Assignment –Unstructured Content –Org Units •Office Files •Organization •HTML, Text –Locations •Request New Data •Request New Function Role-based Access Definition Role-based Data Classification Access Rules and Methods Access Mechanisms (GEM) (GEM) (GEM) Security Architecture (GEM) Security Domains mapped to security policy, procedures, and guidelines, and then to Enterprise Security Architecture (ESA) guidance 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 40 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam BEAM EA products as foundation for System/Software Engineering and Operations.
    • One World BEAM™, Your Tools, and MDEM™ Information System Application Development and Data Modeling Tools Software Design Repository IT Management Tools MDEM Repository IT Repository Resource BEAM Management Requirement Tools Repository Metadata Repository Metadata and Data Management Tools Why Model Driven Enterprise Management (MDEM)? Using modern open-standard technology, MDEM can provide enterprise users with the effectively and efficiently-managed intelligence needed to conduct and improve operational activities, reduce costs, and reduce the latency of decisions. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 41 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam The BEAM, in conjunction with a robust open-standard mechanism to collect and relate data from a variety of tools, provides MDEM. GEM is vendor neutral, although specific technical capabilities applied in the GEM implementation and subsequent operations are provided by a limited number of technology vendors.
    • BEAM and GEM MDEM Repository Elements One World Information Enterprise System Management Focus: •CEO Software •COO Development •CFO Focus: •CHCO •Development IT Governance and Development Focus: IT Operations •CKO Managers •CFO Management Focus: •CIO •CIO •CIO •CIO •Functional Managers •CTO •CTO •CTO Model Driven Enterprise Management - MDEM Tools (GEM Support) GEM Schema Open Standard Enterprise WBEM Tools And Enterprise Software Process Architecture Schema via Model IT Common Model Engineering (GEM) Driven Architecture – MDA Information Workflow (GEM) (BEAM) Model – CIM Open Standard Application Model Data Model (e.g., Schema Web Services, Metadata, ORM, (e.g., UML) IDEF1X) Integration w/ (Networks, Platforms, Business Process Integration via XML Devices, Software, Common Warehouse Integration, and Model Interchange – and Configurations) Metamodel – CWM Workflow (GEM) XMI (GEM) (GEM) (GEM) GEM-based Operation, Asset, Vulnerability, and Security Management OMG Managed Object Format (MOF) Repository (BEAM) OpenGroup and OMG Object Metaschema 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 42 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam BEAM and GEM Repository elements, showing enterprise management, enterprise architecture and IT operation management components. Standard are underlined.
    • One World EMM 3 – Extended Enterprise Architecture (EA) + Information System Enterprise Capability Documentation *** Enterprise Architecture is NOT about information technology. *** IT management benefits from EA, as does everyone in the enterprise, their customers, their partners,their authorities, their suppliers, and the public. (Italic Underlines show IT-Specific EA Elements, with drivers from OMB FEA, Clinger-Cohen Act, OMB A-130 and A11, Investment Budget, etc.) Enterprise Architecture Elements Results Controls Initial • Information for EA, System, and Functional Business Cases • Basis for Role-Based Access Control – RBAC to physical and digital assets (GEM) Business • Information for Organization and Functions Management (e.g., Task Organization, Realignment, Business Architecture (IBA) Reorganization, Merger/Acquisition) Architecture (BA) (2 months) • FEA compliant BRM (FEA BRM and PRM) (DoDAF OV) Full Business • Information for Physical and Digital Asset Management (GEM) Architecture (FBA) • Information for Process Modeling and Management (Workflow and Asset Distribution) (GEM) • Information for Role-based Push/Pull of information for Situational Awareness and C2 (GEM) FEA and (2 months) • Information for Knowledge Base DoDAF/C4ISR • Metadata and Data Management Conformant EA Data Architecture (DA) (8 months) • Basis for Data Classification (Privacy, Confidentiality, Secrecy, Need to Know, etc.) (FEA DRM) (OV) Application Architecture (AA) • Capability Package (Business Component) • Basis for Physical and Digital Asset Access Rules and Methods (GEM) (FEA SRM)(OV) Security Architecture Technology Architecture (TA) • Mechanisms for Asset Distribution and Access Control of Physical and Digital Assets (GEM, Final (SA) (FISMA) RBAC) (FEA TRM) (DoDAF TV) • Personnel Management Technology Enterprise • Information Management Technology (TV) Operation, • Funds Management Technology Asset, Vulnerability, • Skills Management Technology and • Materiel Management Technology Configuration Functional Technology Types –Equipment (e.g., vehicles, factories, IT hardware/software, furniture –Supplies (e.g., food, fuel, office supplies, IT supplies Management (DoDAF AV) • Facilities Management Technology • Services Management Technology –e.g., personnel services, cleaning services, IT services, food services Certification & Infrastructure and Systems Linkage to EA Portfolio s for PRM, Technology Development Accreditation (DoDAF SV) Functional Operations with Technology (FISMA) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 43 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam BEAM supports the development and maintenance of the enterprise architecture. This slide illustrates that, of all of the elements of a full-scale enterprise architecture, only a few relate to information technology. The CIO typically has the lead in EA because IT has measurable economies and efficiencies to gain in satisfying business, legal, and regulatory requirements. But the lead can also come from a functional, program or project manager, or another executive such as the CTO, CKO, CHCO, CSO, CFO, COO, CEO, or President. However, the enterprise executive with the authority to implement the full enterprise architecture, operational enterprise architecture, and intelligent-enterprise management is usually the organization CEO, President, Director, or Commanding General, as an Executive Management Agenda initiative. BEAM extends the early “business systems planning/information strategy planning” (BSP/ISP) of IBM’s Dewey Walker, the later 1987 Enterprise Architecture Framework of IBM’s John Zachman, and the later 1992 Enterprise Architecture Planning methodology of Steven Spewak. While BSP/ISP, Zachman Framework, and Spewak methodology are highly useful and parallel, and can substitute for, much of the initial phases of the BEAM approach, they provide only a subset of the capabilities provided by BEAM. Part of this is because of the basic model applied by these earlier EA efforts. The early efforts are patterned on a “relational” or “matrix” model, while BEAM is patterned on an “object” model, which has the inherent capability of working with more “dimensions” of information than the relational model. The organizations which have used BSP/ISP, Zachman Framework (or its derivatives of FEA/FEAF/TEAF, DoDAF/C4ISR, CADM, DIAD, TOGAF, NASCIO, etc.), or the Spewak Methodology (for pursuing the initial elements of the Zachman Framework) can apply the results of those efforts directly to the BEAM implementation to shorten BEAM implementation time.
    • One World BEAM Delivers Capabilities Information System BEAM Repository (MDEM Technology) BEAM Results • Single repository for integrating and sharing Multiple Input • Missions • Objectives Intelligence for Operations And Output • Visions • Strategies • Traceability of Capability Architecture, Formats • Goals • Plans Development, and Operation costs to • Performance Results Executive Management Agenda and Enterprise and Functional Missions • Reusable Component Management • Business Drivers • Technology Drivers • Relationship Drivers Organization • Enterprise Architecture Mission Organization EA • AIS Design, Test Plans, Test Data •PRM Extension • Metadata and Data Management Enterprise • Physical and Digital Assets Model Relating •BRM Extension • Portfolio Management Enterprise and •DRM Extension • Configuration Management Functional Missions •SRM Extension •TRM Extension •FISMA SA (GEM) Functional Capability Reference (Component, System) Architecture Architecture Specifications supporting Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) and Methodology Functional • PRM = Performance Reference Model • BRM = Business Reference Model Requirements Capability And • DRM = Data Reference Model Development • SRM = Service Component (e.g., Application) Reference Model Priorities Capability • TRM = Technical Reference Model Approved Operation and • FISMA = Federal Information Security Management Act Designs Maintenance • SA = Security Architecture Deployed • MDEM = Model Driven Enterprise Management Components (Reality) BEAM enables a smooth flow, with accountability, from mission to implementation. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 44 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This diagram illustrates the GEM repository, from a US Government perspective, as the mechanism for connecting business drivers, enterprise management, IT management, and IT components/assets. It can do the same for management of any category of assets.
    • Capability (Requirement) Management Life Cycle One World Information Life Cycle Development by Functional Area (Requirements Management Process) System Requirements Analysis Build/Buy Acquisition Activity Implement Capability ISO 15704 Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology System Engineering (ANSI/EIA 632) and/or Software Engineering (IEEE/EIA 12207) Life Cycle Process Buy Buy Capability Software Integration from Product/ Conduct of Organizational Functional And Functional Service Vendors System Integration Activity Strategic Planning Infrastructure Integration Product/ Service Enterprise Integration Decision to Build or Organization and Evaluation Security Review Buy Required Function Plans Criteria Operational Capability and Policy Acceptance Test (OAT) Vendor Preliminary Design Emails, Tasking Contact Review Letters, Concept Build Critical Design ISO 14258 Papers, Enquiries Review Product Evaluation. Enterprise Build Capability, Anectdotal Design Phase Security Test Basic Modeling Requirement using System/ (Documents, Evaluation Build Phase Documents Software References), Operate, Maintain, Scenario Recommendation Developers Demonstration, and and Dispose Test Evaluations Against Criteria Test Phase Requirement Develop Statements, With Performance Deploy Phase Authorizing Official Prototype or FOC (Load/Stress) Idenity. Table of Development Initial Operational Final Operational Test. Network, emphatic "shall" Using Product/Service Capability Capability Integrate System, statements with a Deployment Deployment person held Integrate Product/Service Into Application, and accountable ($) for Enterprise, Infrastructrure, Service Tests its validity System, or Software Function Test, Requirement Against Validated Verification. Requirement System/Software Requirements Solution Satisfies Validation Specifications (e.g., ISO 830- Validated 1998 System Requirement Requirements Specification (SRS)) Requirements Traceback Functional IT Infrastructure/Systems/Software Internal Functions External Functional IT Infrastructure/Systems/Software Functions Functional IT Infrastructure/Systems/ Other Software Functions 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 45 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This diagram illustrates the life cycle of requirements management derived from day to day operations, with system and software development being traceable back to the underlying operational need. This life cycle is mapped to the corresponding standards which can be used to guide the management of development efforts and the corresponding methodology, notation, and tool selection of the enterprise.
    • Typical Manually Controlled Role-Based Security One World Information (What are you securing, from whom or what, in what situation?) System •Q: What are you securing? A: Resources (i.e., Assets) and Processes. •Q: Whom or what are you securing from? A: Users = persons, processes, devices, etc.) •Q: How are you securing? A: Assigning (i.e., giving responsibility and authority) resource access rights to users. •Q: How do you measure security? A: Regularly count vulnerabilities to any and all resources on enterprise and value-chain scale, and watch and measure vulnerabilities and breaches over time. Resource Identity Management Management User •Networks Identity User Resource •Databases (Assignments •Applications User Resource Inventory Based on •File Systems Human Inventory And •Message Systems Knowledge Relationship and Actions) Classification •Facilities Management •Equipment Value-Chain Process / Workflow Operation 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 46 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This diagram illustrates the elements of enterprise security enabled through the typical manual process. The weakness in this approach becomes apparent when the number of assigned requirements increase, and the need for changing assignments becomes more fluid.
    • BEAM-Based Security for Internal Control One World Information System (What are you securing, from whom or what, in what situation?) •Q: What are you securing? A: Resources (i.e., Assets) and Processes. •Q: Whom or what are you securing from? A: Users = persons, processes, devices, etc.) •Q: How are you securing? A: Assigning (i.e., giving responsibility and authority) resource access rights to users. •Q: How do you measure security? A: Regularly count vulnerabilities to any and all resources on enterprise and value-chain scale, and watch and measure vulnerabilities and breaches over time. Resource Identity BEAM Content Management Management User Rights Third Identity Control •Networks Party Tools User Resource •Databases User (Assignments •Applications Resource Inventory Management) •File Systems Inventory And •Message Systems Classification •Facilities Relationship Authenticate Authorize •Equipment Management Person or Or Prohibit Value-Chain Process? Access? Process / Workflow BEAM KB to Assign Operation (i.e., as Internal Controls) BEAM KB to Specify User Resource User Access Permissions BEAM KB to Specify Requirements and Distribution to Resources Resource Access Constraints BEAM Knowledge Base (i.e., EA Management Repository) SUBJECT SUBJECT CONTEXT 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 47 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This diagram illustrates the elements of enterprise security enabled through the GEM methodology and supporting tools.
    • One World BEAM Cycle “Tree” Analogy in relation to FEA and DoDAF/C4ISR Elements Information System EMM1-Functional Products System Products (Templates and Instances) (Templates and Instances) EMM2-Functional Operations Systems Functional Systems DoDAF System View EMM2-Functional Security Management (FISMA) Operations (Rules) EMM3-Infrastructure Infrastructure EMM3-Full Technical Architecture DoDAF Technical Functional (FEA TRM) View Security Architecture Reference Architecture Application Architecture (FEA SRM) (FISMA SA) Data Architecture (FEA DRM) EMM3-Functional Guidance Business Architecture DoDAF Operational and Intelligence (FEA BRM and PRM) View BEAM Approach BEAM Approach BEAM Approach To EA To EA (e.g., Zachman, FEAF, To DoDAF/C4ISR FEA, TOGAF, Spewak, etc.) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 48 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam BEAM operates from the principle of a “spiral life cycle”, also known as a “closed loop system”. The results of one cycle are fed into the next cycle, providing part of the basis for adjusting that subsequent cycle. In BEAM, EA information products, such as reports, documents, data, etc., are “recycled” by the enterprise to refine its knowledge about its EA. Because BEAM is based on the GEM “generalized” approach, BEAM can be applied to perform enterprise architecture in all its varieties.
    • One World BEAM - System (EMM Level 1) Capability Architecture Elements Information System System Capability Architecture Elements Capability Documentation System Pattern Matching (Ref. IBM System Business Patterns for eBusiness and Component System/Software Design Patterns) Development Life Cycle Security Enterprise Architecture Stages Management References High Level Security Business Architecture Reference Business, Integration, Composite, and Security Business Component Capability (e.g., Architecture Selection (Basis for Role-Based Access Patterns (i.e., Solution Set) System) Reference Control – RBAC) (FEA BRM and PRM) Definition Architecture Selection (BEAM Step 30 & 31) (BEAM) (GEM) Data Architecture Reference Selection Application and Security Patterns (Basis for Data Classification) (FEA DRM) (BEAM Step 30 & 31) Configuration Application Architecture Reference Management Selection (Basis for Access Rules and Across all Methods) (FEA SRM) (BEAM Step 30 & Aspects of the 31) Enterprise Technology Architecture Reference Application, Runtime and Security Patterns, Business Component Selection (Mechanisms for Access Runtime TRM Service Categories, Security Testing and Control) (FEA TRM) Service Categories Deployment (GEM) Detail Design, AIS Certification Business Function Requirement and Implementation and Process (BEAM Step 30 & 31) Plan, Tracking, Accreditation Performance (C&A) (GEM) Infrastructure Development, Operations, Approved Runtime Products and Security Measurement, and Maintenance (GEM) Products Reporting, and Adjustments Platform Development, Operation, and Maintenance (GEM) Software, Development, Operation, and Approved Runtime and Security Products and Maintenance (GEM) Software Design Patterns Content Development, Operation and Quality Assurance and Performance Maintenance Performance (GEM) Measurement Customer, Business, and Investment Customer Relationship Management (CRM), Satisfaction (GEM) Business Utility (e.g., Balanced Scorecard), and Investment Goals (e.g., CPIC) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 49 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam Bottom-Up EA. EA built up from the System Capability level by linking to or creating enterprise-wide EA references.
    • One World Information System 4. BEAM Procedures
    • BEAM Project Gantt Chart (Blue Bars) One World Information (BEAM Precedes GEM, BPR, and Capability Design, Development, and Operations) System 2003 2004 ID Task Name BEAM Activities Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 1 GEM Methodology Life Cycle Phases (Enterprise Architecture) 2 Basic Enterprise Architecture Methodology (BEAM) life cycle. EMM3 This diagram is available for 3 BEAM Site Survey download from 4 BEAM Initial Business Architecture http://www.one-world- BEAM Full Business 5 Architecture BEAM Enterprise IT is.com/beam/BEAM+GEM+I 6 GEM Activities, including 7 Architecture BEAM Data Architecture T%20Gantt.jpg BEAM Application Development of Security 8 9 Architecture BEAM Technical Architecture Architecture as 10 GEM EA-based Security Architecture. EMM4 predecessor to GEM-Based Ongoing Security, 11 Vulnerability, and Risk Management Established. EMM4 BPR and Solution Design, GEM EA-based Ongoing 12 Knowledge Inventory. EMM4 GEM EA-based Ongoing Development, and 13 Knowledge Integration. EMM4/5 Expertise Location and This resource-loaded project plan, in MS Project 14 Categorization Operation; Sarbanes-Oxley 15 Expertise Development and Certification Expertise Notification and format, is available at Act support First/Rapid 16 Recall 17 Expertise Communication, Coordination, and Collaboration http://www.one-world- Response support, etc. 18 GEM EA-based Ongoing Knowledge Structure Definition. EMM4/5 is.com/beam/BEAM- 19 GEM Ongoing Integration of Enterprise Workflow, Applications, EMM3%20Organization%2 20 and Information. EMM4/5) GEM EA-based Situational 0EA-IT%20Rollout.mpp Awareness. EMM5 BPR Activities based on 21 EA-Based Business Process Improvement. EMM2, After BEAM 22 Initial BPI List detailed enterprise and 23 Refined BPI List functional analysis 24 Baseline BPI List 25 BPI Project Template resulting from BEAM. 26 BPI Projects (Multiple) 27 BPI Projects (Multiple) 28 BPI Projects (Multiple) EA-based Technology Solution Logical Design (UML, Metadata/Data 29 Model, Data Migration). EMM1, After Solution Logical Design, 30 BPI Technology Logical Design Project A calculator to identify the under EA governance, 31 Template Technology Logical Design Projects (Multiple) rough order of magnitude Technology Logical Design Projects (ROM) cost and duration of using standard system 32 (Multiple) 33 Technology Logical Design Projects (Multiple) a BEAM project for your and software modeling 34 EA-Based Technology Physical Development. EMM1, After Logical organization may be techniques and Design 35 Technology Insertion Assessment downloaded from approved products and 36 Technology Build/Buy/Reuse Acquisition Assessment http://www.one-world- Technology Physical Development is.com/beam/BEAM%20Or Services from Technical 37 Project Template 38 Technology Physical Development Projects ganization%20Project%20 Architecture 39 EA-Based Functional Technology Operations and Maintenance. EMM1, After Development Scaling%20Formula.xls 40 Technology Operations Solution Development and 41 42 Technology Maintenance Technology Maintenance Operation under EA Governance 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 51 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam The BEAM approach is easily implemented and controlled through standard project management techniques, and can serve as the comprehensive and consistent systems analysis needed for enterprise and/or functional BPR and subsequent functional capability implementation and operation.
    • BEAM Information Structure One World Information Enterprise Locations Technology System Organizations Category Organization Units Updated through Technology IT Management Functions (e.g., WfMC) Knowledge Vendor continuous Policy Ontology Technology functional Process (e.g., BPMS) Semantics Product Taxonomy or Service refinement Procedure Template (e.g., Vocabulary Technology (dynamic data, Enterprise Context Web Forms Inventory and Service Information Sets Tracking metadata, (Supports and WSDL) (Functional References) Universal Metadata Managed Interoperability Bus ontologies, and Application Rules (Supports Workflow – (Network and Service Infrastructure) knowledge) Network - UAN) Technology WfMC, BPM, WSDL) (Enterprise Service Bus (ESB), Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), (technology Components Enterprise Application Integration (EAI), Enterprise Information Integration (EII), insertion/refresh) Interface Electronic Data Interchange, (EDI) etc.) (Adjust Mission Behavior External / Internet Bus down through Interaction Transaction / Event Internal / Intranet Bus Plan) (Continuously Business Responsibility Resource Architecture Improve Internal (e.g., BRM and Authority Role Controls) CPV, PRM, OV) Budget Input Control Data (Internal and External) Production GEM Security Architecture Goal Output Architecture (DRM, OV) Mechanism Service Service Mission Component (SRM, OV) Vision GEM Knowledge Architecture Plan Technical Management (SRM, OV) Goal Approach Business Architecture Objective Service Strategy Plan Management (Program, Portfolio) Approach GEM Expertise Levels Management (BRM, SRM, OV) Plan System Engineering (Recurring, Initiative) Service Management Plan (SEMP) Project Bus Software Engineering (SV) Task GEM Learning Management Integrated Priority and Ranking Management Plan Management Technology Strategic, Operations, of Plan Product Architecture (Operations, Investments) (Deliverable and Project/Tactical Life (TRM, TV) Activity Cycle Implementation of Plan GEM Enterprise Dependency Process and BEAM Enterprise Tracking Value-Chain Workflow Architecture (Core Performance Schedule (Function as Service) Enterprise Knowledge Assessing Performance Resource Base) (e.g., FEA, DoDAF, Against Plan TOGAF8 Support) (AV). Reporting Performance GEM Real-Time Situational GPRA, GPEA, CCA, and Adjusting Performance Awareness FISMA Support. Sarbanes- (Service Agents) Assessment of Strategy, Objective, Goal, Mission, Function, and Enterprise Oxley Internal Control Reporting Verification Support. Adjusting 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 52 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam The large frame in this diagram represents the hierarchy of subjects encompassed and integrated by BEAM to create a core enterprise knowledge base. The gray boxes to the left represent the GEM products built from the BEAM Knowledge Base content.
    • BEAM – Procedural Flow One World (Concurrently For All Enterprise Organizations, Functions, Programs, and Projects) Information System Business Architecture (Including FEA Performance Reference Model – 13. Strategies 29. Functional 12. Performance 14. Plans 25. Requirements 32. Performance PRM, and Business Reference Model Definitions Programs Indicators - BRM) & Portfolios & Projects BA-PRM 11. Objectives Elements 10. Goals Resource 9. Vision Management 5. Mission Services 7. Responsibility 8. Authority 26. Budgets 27. Budget Lines 28. Expense Elements BA-BRM Elements 4. Function 6. Policy 3. Organization Unit 2. Organization 1. Location Application 15. Process Architecture Function (Including FEA Service 16. Procedure Capability Component Reference 18. Constraints, Components Model - SRM) Rules, and 17. Templates Principles Data Architecture 19. Metadata (Including FEA Data Reference Model - DRM) 20. Data Dictionary 21. Data IT Services Technology 22. Equipment, Supplies, and Service (IT and Others) Architecture (Including Technical 23. Technology Catalog Reference Model - TRM) 24. Technology-Specification and Insertion Technology 30. Technology Infrastructure, Systems, and Devices Testing, Development, and Deployment Components 31. Technology Prototyping, Operation, and Maintenance 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 53 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This diagram illustrates the operational flow of an organization using the BEAM life cycle. It also represents the multiple-level linkage of EA entity/relationship or class schema. The BEAM procedure is equivalent to a resource management procedure. In this case, the resource managed by BEAM is architectural information and optionally, information about actual or intended instances of enterprise infrastructure and systems built, operated, and maintained in conformance with the architecture. BEAM enables refinement of enterprise architecture throughout each subsequent cycle. The information created, used, and modified in this procedure needs to be stored in a single repository to avoid fragmentation of the enterprise architecture. This diagram also illustrates the operational flow elements of the BEAM Spiral Life Cycle overlaid on the top-level OMB FEA Model with its PRM, BRM, SRM, DRM, and TRM elements, shown as yellow frames. The light blue boxes represent operational activities common to most organizations, whether accomplished formally or informally. Note that while an “enterprise architecture”, shown here as BEAM components in relation to the FEA model, has elements in common across all organizations, GEM extends the organization’s enterprise architecture to support the larger enterprise management process of secure organizational operations management from managed organizational intelligence. GEM extends the BEAM, FEA, Zachman Framework, C4ISR/DoDAF, TOGAF, TEAF, and other EA frameworks, and glues these EA efforts together with the operational efforts, melding them into a full enterprise management (EM) solution framework. GEM, as a methodology, repository, and repository-based and repository-integrated applications, provides a dynamic federated interoperability model for communities of interest (COI) within the enterprise, and a comprehensive EA and EM management approach. The concepts underlying EA are not new. EA is largely the repackaging of what most who have taken an "enterprise view", or a "system view of the organization" have done all along. Note that The EA and FEA, through BEAM or otherwise, are not ends in themselves, but are a means to gain control over technology expenditures, primarily IT expenditures. IT spending has shown the trend of suboptimization - spending on localized views of need for assigned or assumed functions, not prioritized enterprise requirements. This control over technology spending and the reduction of suboptimization directly supports the alignment of the Executive Branch and its operations with the President's Management Agenda, in pursuit of Performance Management and compliance with the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA). If the common operational artifacts above are reviewed by those outside of the EA and IT communities, then most will acknowledge that their organization performs the activities yielding enterprise-wide common operational artifacts roughly matching the PRM and BMR. Fewer will have enterprise-wide common operational artifacts matching the SRM, while even fewer will have enterprise-wide common operational artifacts matching the DRM and TRM. The need for a closed loop EA process thus drives the need for a shared, distributed, common, enterprise-wide repository for EA. Without such a shared repository - an "enterprise brain“ - every activity in this flow that is not shared through the repository breaks that activity and its subsequent activities out of the "enterprise-wide" view and makes it a locally suboptimized activity. If an EA activity and its artifacts are not stored and processed in the shared repository, they are hidden from the enterprise view and enterprise accountability. This takes local operational autonomy too far in the direction of wildness and away from the controlled order needed by any organization to survive and thrive. It's like a wild mutation, or worse, like cancer. Most wild mutations are not beneficial to the organization/organism, and cancer is never beneficial. A closed-loop, self-referencing, environmentally adaptive, self-healing management process is needed.
    • BEAM – Procedure Steps One World Information System 0. Identify your enterprise, most typically your organization. For your enterprise, identify the following to the degree you consider economical and relevant. Store and maintain all of this information in a single data store to reduce enterprise fragmentation. 1. What locations are relevant to you? Where do you operate? 2. What is your organization's name? What are the organization names of your value-chain stakeholders (i.e., customers, suppliers, authorities, and partners), and what are their locations which are relevant to you? 3. What are your organization's internal units, as typically portrayed as blocks on an organization chart, or more formally identified by a budget, plan, or program within your organization's aggregate financial management plan? What are the relevant organization units of your customers, suppliers, authorities, and partners for each internal organization unit? 4. What are the functions (i.e., assigned work) performed by your organization units? What are the relevant functions performed by their relevant organization units of your customers, suppliers, authorities, and partners? 5. What is the mission of each organizational unit's function? 6. What policy governs the function? BA 7. Which person, identified by name, unique identifier, and assigned position, is responsible for achieving the function's mission? 8. What is the boundary of the functional mission's authority in terms of function, functional interfaces, organization units, organizations, and locations? 9. What is the responsible person's vision of perfect mission performance? 10. What measurable goals has the responsible person defined to achieve the vision of perfect mission performance? 11. What performance objectives, specified in terms of schedule, cost, and quality, has the responsible person defined to attain these goals? 12. What quantitative performance indicators give proof of reaching the objective on time, within budget, to the required quality specified? 13. What strategies, including executing portfolios of investments, will enable the responsible person to quantitatively prove, through meeting the specified performance indicators, that they have attained their objectives, and thus goals, and thus mission? 14. What plans, either for recurring operations or new initiative projects, will be used to implement each strategy? 15. What process will be followed in performing the planned recurring operation or initiative project? 16. What specific procedure will be followed at each defined step of the process? 17. What template will be used to collect or present information used in the procedure, and is this template automated (e.g., online form, web service) or manual (paper)? 18. What constraints, rules, or principles must be complied with in using the template? DA 19. What metadata does the template and constraint contain? AA 20. What is the unique ID for each metadata item in each template and each constraint? 21. What is the procedural transaction data for each metadata item in the template or constraint? 22. What equipment, supplies, and/or service is required to complete the procedure, in what quantity, with what qualities, on what schedule? 23. What category describes each equipment, supply, and service resource, and is this category approved by the enterprise's architecture (i.e., component and interface) control authority to avoid wild variance in enterprise resources? TA 24. What are the item/product/vendor specifics of the equipment, supply or service required for the procedure, and is this technology ubiquitous, in early adoption, or in the research stage? 25. What are the collected requirements, defined in terms of procedural performance resources, in specific quantities, with specific qualities, at specific times, at specific cost, for fully implementing the plans? 26. What is the budget in the current and future years for filling the requirements of the plans, for the strategies, in accomplishing the function's objectives, goals, and mission? 27. What budget line items, in the aggregate, fully describe the requirement? 28. What elements of expense (i.e., pre-established categories of resources) categorize each budget line? 29. As sub-functions, what programs, as collections of inter-related projects, and which program and project managers, are given responsibility for satisfying the requirements? 30. What capability technology insertion, development, and deployment projects are governed by the Program and Project Managers, and what are their detailed performance BA schedule, budget, and quality constraints? (Use ANSI 632 System Engineering Process, and ISO 12207 Software Life Cycle Management as guidelines here) 31. What initial and recurring capability prototyping, operations, and maintenance are governed by the Program or Functional Managers, and what are their detailed performance schedule, budget, and quality constraints? (Use ANSI 632 System Engineering Process, and ISO 12207 Software Life Cycle Management as guidelines here) Feed all collected responses to these questions into the EA repository, noting that items 30 and 31 related to actual infrastructure and system development, deployment, operation, and maintenance, not enterprise architecture. However, these items form the basis for measuring compliance with the architecture and the success/fit of the architecture to the enterprise/function mission. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 54 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam Business architecture is developed in steps 0 through 19 and 25 through 31. Data architecture is developed in steps 17 through 21. Application architecture is developed in steps 18 through 21. Technical Architecture is developed in steps 22 through 25. Note that Information Technology is considered only as one category within the TA and is not given consideration in the BA, DA, or AA.
    • Technology Insertion/Refreshment Process Flow One World Information (Within Steps 24, 30, and 31 of BEAM Procedure) System 1. Business Architecture A. Technology 3. 12. Advanced Technology 9. Prototype 6. Pilot (BRM) Insertion Current Demonstration Systems Systems Systems Center Systems B. Proven 2. Existent Patterns Data (DRM) 10. Future IT 7. Next Generation IT 4. Current IT And Shared Infrastructure Infrastructure Infrastructure / and Components Application Prototypes / Testbed / Prototypes / Testbed / Shared (SRM) Shared Components Shared Components Components Architectures C. Evolving 11. Future IT 8. Next Generation. IT Time-Phased 5. Current IT Architecture (TRM) Architecture (TRM) + Architecture (TRM) Architecture (TRM) + + Exploratory Proactive/ Planned Rapid Adaptive Change Change Change Architecture Driver Roles •User Awareness •Functional User Deprecated •Functional Technologist Use •IT Management Awareness •IT Researcher •IT Architect •IT Infrastructure Engineer Common •IT System Engineer Use I. R&D III. Standards V. Deployed II. Early IV. Early VI. Early VII. Ubiquitous IT Technology/ Deployment Prototypes Adoption Deployment Product Status 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 55 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This diagram illustrates the phases of activity involved in developing and implementing an IT Architecture and the related infrastructure and systems. If reading the bottom bar from right to left, an organization cannot gain ubiquitous deployment (i.e., VII) of some IT capability until the capability has progressed through most, if not all, of the preceding phases (i.e., I – VI).
    • One World Technology Insertion/Refreshment Procedure Information System The process for reviewing technology for insertion into the organization can use the following steps. 1. Determine the business architecture 2. Determine the data and application architectures. 3. Examine the current (As-Is) technology infrastructure and systems supporting the applications’ processing of data for business operations. Identify the requirements for inserting other technology (either new or common-use) into the ToBe infrastructure or systems. Plan the insertion project. Initially test the insertion as a pilot system (i.e., #6) in a lab. Initially implement and operate the insertion pilot. Operationally test the insertion. Gain acceptance of the insertion operational results. Fully implement the insertion as a production system. Operate and maintain the inserted technology. 4. Identify the technology components in the pilots, systems, and infrastructure that have use across multiple applications, data models, and business processes. 5. Register the successful pilot and operational technologies in the TRM as suitable for production systems, and have future system/infrastructure developers specify the technology’s TRM category in their initial plans and design. 6. Develop and test pilot systems using early-adoption and deployed-standard technologies in the lab. 7. Identify technologies in the pilot that need to be prototyped in a lab yet which appear to satisfy unique and common requirements. 8. Include the successfully prototyped deployed technologies in the TRM as suitable for “Next Generation” and pilot systems. 9. Develop and prototype systems using R&D, pre-standard, and new-standard technologies in the lab. 10. Identify technologies in the prototype that need further R&D and standardization. 11. Include successfully prototyped pre-standard technologies in the TRM as suitable for future prototypes and pilots. 12. Work with researchers to conduct Advanced Technology Demonstrations prior to the technology’s standardization and register successfully demonstrated technology in the TRM as appropriate for prototyping and piloting of future systems. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 56 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • One World Information System 5. Standards/Technology Supporting BEAM
    • BEAM - Enterprise IT Reference Architecture One World Information (i.e., Technical Process Standards) System BEAM leverages these standards and others Software Life Cycle Management (IEEE / EIA 12207.x) (IT) Resource Management, Requirements Enterprise Process for Engineering a System (ANSI/EIA 632) (IT) Management, and Access Mission Provisioning Management System and Software Requirement (GPRA, CC/ITMRA, Specification (IEEE 1233-1996 and Performance Management, 830-1998) (IT) IT Investment Planning and Configuration Mgmt (ANSI/EIA-649) Management) ISO/IEC 11179 Series – Specification and Standardization of Data Elements (IT) Acquisition Management (e.g., DoD 5000 Enterprise References Series, CMM, CMMI) (Policy, Process, ANSI/EIA 748-1998, Earned Value Procedure, Templates, Management Systems Standards), Methodology, SEI Capability Maturity Model Integrated Role Management, and (CMMI) (IT) Information Assurance Architectures Enterprise Reference Architecture and (Defining and Methodology (ISO 15704, FEA, ISO 9000) Defending the Enterprise Modeling (ISO 14258) Enterprise External and Internal Information Assurance Common Criteria (ISO 15408) Boundaries) Standards Container / Component Relations 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 58 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This diagram illustrates the enterprise and IT standards leveraged by BEAM, and the applications and resultant functionality that results from implementing them as parts of the GEM whole-enterprise management approach.
    • One World BEAM Information Product Categories Information System Context Timeframe for (Individual or Collective World View, Intelligence Technology Philosophical Ontology) Item, List, Prehistory Outline, Table, Till Now Reference Table Information (Structured and Unstructured) Network, Hierarchical, and Relational 1951 Till Database, Words Dictionaries Hierarchical Directory, (Words and Phrases, Now (Concepts, Tagged Multidimensional With Definitions, Information) Database Variants, and Usage) Keywords Lexicon/Vocabularies (Major Concepts, (Function-Specific Tagged Information) Word and Phrase Variants) Concept Maps Taxonomies (Keyword Relations: (Categorized Word Category, Containment, Inventory, Sequence, Change, Reference) With Word Variants) Data Models Data Meaning (Significance, or value, (Keyword (i.e., Entity) of Entity to Users, Relations, with Attributes) Meaningful Information) Semantic Models Databases (Detailed Data Models, (Entity Values) with Detailed Relationships) Process Models Applications (Automated Rule-Based (Information/Work Flow Processing of Data for Across Users and Value Chain) Transactions and Analysis) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 59 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • BEAM, with Your EA and Other Tools, with One World Information MDEM™ System Legacy EA Tools (UML, XMI, IDEF, or Proprietary Formats) (Metis, PTech, Popkin, Agilense/Adaptive, Rational, Poseidon, etc.) Tool Repository or Format IT Management Tools XMI (Network, Platform, Help Desk, Applications, Storage) MDEM MOF Repository CIM (WBEM) (Open Source and Multiple Vendors) EAMS Tools (OMB Exhibit 300 XMI BEAM Support) CWM Metadata Repository Metadata and Data Management Tools (Application Data Models, Warehouse Data Models, i.e., IDEF1X, ORM)) (Operational and Analytical Data) 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 60 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam The BEAM methodology, in conjunction with a robust mechanism to collect and relate data from a variety of tools, provides the start point for MDEM.
    • OMG 4 Layer Metamodel for MDEM One World Information (MDA, SPEM, XMI, GEM/BEAM, CIM, CWM) System MetaObject Facility M3 MOF (metadata repository) Object Metaschema (Generalized Object Model, Generalized Object Repository) MOF M2 BEAM Metaschema UML (SPEM) UML (XMI) CWM Metaschema CIM Metaschema Extension/Profile BEAM Design SW Process SW Design Data Design CIM Design Metamodel Metamodel Metamodel Metamodel Metamodel MOF-based M1 BEAM Schema RUP RUP CWM Schema CIM Schema Application Design BEAM Design SW Process SW Design Data Design CIM Design Model Model Model Model Model MOF-based Implemented Implemented Implemented Data Management IT Management M0 Application Instance Project Project Project Repository Repository BEAM Instance SW Process SW Design Data Model CIM Instance In Enterprise Performance For System or Or Aggregated On Device, or Or Aggregated Or Aggregated Aggregated Data Models Aggregated GEM Capability Performance Design IT Management 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 61 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam This diagram provides a means of comparing the underlying structure of BEAM to “object” management standards.
    • One World 6. Products Supporting BEAM Information System Model Driven Enterprise Management - MDEM - Technology (GEM Support) GEM Schema Open Standard Enterprise Architecture Schema IT Management Tools (FEA, DoDAF, TOGAF, etc.) Business, Data, (Integrated Software Application, & Technical) Tools Process Enterprise, Engineering •Agilense WebModeler Metaschema •Popkin SA CWM Schema (Data CIM Schema (IT Models) Function, •PTech and Metadata Models) (SPEM) (MOF) Process, Standards and •Computas Metis •Data Modeling •Troux (HW/SW/Net/EA) Data, Tools (GEM) •Other EA/CASE Tools •Metadata Management •Isogon (SW) •BI Tools •Tivoli TM1 System, Open •OLAP Tools •MS SMS Software, Standard XMI Schema •Data Warehouse Tools •BMC Patrol Business •3HT eSnap Security, Process (Application Models) •HP OpenView •UML Tool Examples •Schema Logic •Other WBEM Tools & Integration •Rational •MetaMatrix Standards Subsumed by Knowledge (WSDL, BPM) •Poseidon ORM Tools (for CIM/MOF and Workflow Semantic and Data Modeling (WfMC, UAN) ORM Tools •SNMP IP Tools (MIB) (Semantic Models) Modeling) •Desktop Mgmt Tools (MIF) And Standards •MS Visio for EA •MS Visio for •HelpDesk Tools (SES/SIS) Management) and Tools •MS VisioModeler EA •Others (GEM) •MS VisioModeler GEM-based Operation, Asset, Vulnerability, and Security Management Tools OMG Managed Object Format (MOF) Repository OpenGroup and OMG Object Metaschema 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 62 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam BEAM and GEM Repository elements, showing enterprise management, enterprise architecture and IT operation management components. Standard are underlined.
    • One World Information System 7. Sample BEAM Implementation Project Plans
    • 7.1 Sample BEAM Organizational EA (EMM 3) One World Information Project Plan System ID BEAM Task Name BEAM Deliverable Duration Dec 7, '03 Jan 11, '0 4 Feb 15, '04 Mar 21, '04 Apr 25, '0 4 May 30, '04 Jul 4, '04 Aug 8, '04 Step T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 1 Develop Enterprise Architecture 174 days 2 Preparation Phase Determine Scale, Complexity, and Readiness for EA 10 days 3 Site Survey and Readiness Assessment 10 days BC 4 Repository installation and configuration 5 days BE,BC 5 Operation Management Conduct BEAM Operations Management 169 days 6 Repository Operation, Maintenance, and 169 days BE Customiz ation 7 Change Management Planning, Dissemination, 164 days BC Implementation, and Tracking. BEAM Tailoring 8 Initial Business Architecture Business Case for Full EA (EMM 3) and GEM (EMM 4 42 days and 5), Partial EA (Extending FEA BRM into initial GEM Functional Knowledge Base). Initiate Role-Based Access Control – RBAC definition for physical and digital asset security. 21 Full Business Architecture FEA compliant BRM. Additional Information for 40 days Physical and Digital Asset Management Security. Initial Process Modeling for Workflow and Asset Distribution. Additional Information for Enterprise 27 Enterprise Architecture BRM, PRM, DRM, SRM, and TRM for FEA 35 days Conformance. Enterprise Guidance Inventory. 36 Budget and Portfolio Development Enterprise Portfolio Analysis. 30 days 42 Infrastructure, System, and IT Management Mapping of Resources to Mission. 5 days Linkage to EA Labor Category Initials Rate Work Cost BEAM Consultant BC $280.00/hr 1,382 hrs $386,960.00 BEAM Repository Engineer BE $120.00/hr 1,392 hrs $167,040.00 Business Architect BA $170.00/hr 1,216 hrs $206,720.00 Data Architect DA $150.00/hr 222 hrs $33,300.00 Application Architect AA $150.00/hr 142 hrs $21,300.00 Technology Architect TA $150.00/hr 360 hrs $54,000.00 Estimate $869,320.00 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 64 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • 7.2 Sample BEAM Functional Architecture (EMM2) Project Plan One World Information (e.g., for A76 Studies and As-Is Function Modeling Independent of Organization EA) System ID BEAM Task Name BEAM Deliverable Duration ec 28, '03 Jan 4, '04 Jan 11, '04 Jan 18, '04 Jan 25, '04 Step M W F S T T S M W F S T T S M W F 1 Develop Functional Architecture prior to Full Organization Rich functional As-Is model for Planning improvement, 22 days EA competetive sourcing, and start of knowledge management and skillset alignment. 2 Preparation Phase Determine Scale, Complexity, and Readiness for Architecture 2 days Effort 3 Site Survey and Readiness Assessment 2 days BC 4 Repository installation and configuration 1 day BE,BC 5 Operation Management Conduct BEAM Operations Management 20 days 6 Repository Operation, Maintenance, and 20 days BE Customization 7 Change Management Planning, Dissemination, 19 days BC Implementation, and Tracking. BEAM Tailoring 8 Initial Function Business Architecture Business Case for Full EA (EMM 3) and GEM (EMM 4 and 5), 6 days Partial EA (Extending FEA BRM into initial GEM Functional Knowledge Base). Initiate Role-Based Access Control – RBAC definition for physical and digital asset security. 21 Full Function Business Architecture FEA compliant BRM. Additional Information for Physical and 7 days Digital Asset Management Security. Initial Process Modeling for Workflow and Asset Distribution. Additional Information for Enterprise Knowledge Base. 27 Function Enterprise Architecture BRM, PRM, DRM, SRM, and TRM for FEA Conformance. 4.5 days Enterprise Guidance Inventory. Metadata and Data Inventory. 36 Budget and Portfolio Development Enterprise Portfolio Analysis. 3.5 days 42 Functional Infrastructure, System, and IT Management Mapping of Resources to Mission. 0.5 days Linkage to Functional Architecture Labor Category Initials Rate Work Cost BEAM Consultant BC $280.00/hr 207.5 hrs $58,100.00 BEAM Repository Engineer BE $120.00/hr 168 hrs $20,160.00 Business Architect BA $170.00/hr 170 hrs $28,900.00 Data Architect DA $150.00/hr 36 hrs $5,400.00 Application Architect AA $150.00/hr 28 hrs $4,200.00 Technology Architect TA $150.00/hr 40 hrs $6,000.00 Estimate $122,760.00 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 65 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • One World 8. BEAM Scenarios for Initial EA Governance Cycle Information System • Enterprise-wide (Top Down) Implementation = BEAM Procedure Steps 0-31 • System-level (Bottom Up) Implementation = BEAM Procedure Steps 22-31, 0-21 multiplied by number of systems to be architected and linked to Functional Architecture. • Functional (Middle Out) Implementation = BEAM Procedure Steps 13-31, 0-12 multiplied by number of functions to be architected and linked to Enterprise Architecture. 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 66 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam
    • One World 9. BEAM Summary Information System • BEAM provides a comprehensive step by step procedure to walk an organization, group, or person through the inventory, identification, categorization, and subsequent management of things that are important to them. • BEAM provides the process and information products needed for enterprise architecture management • BEAM can be used for many purposes beyond developing an enterprise architecture and IT portfolios, to include providing the Enterprise Knowledge Base foundation for: – Security Management – Knowledge/Expertise Management – Real-Time Situational Awareness – Business Process Reengineering – IT Design/Development/Operations – Outsourcing/Reorganization/Realignment/Relocation Studies – Performance Management of Enterprise and Functional Missions 2/19/2004 This Work Is Provided Under The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 67 License of Roy Roebuck, 1982-2003. http://one-world-is.com/beam