Sustainability Committee 2009 SDAT Proposal

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Sustainability Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council proposal for the 2009 AIA SDAT (Sustainable Design Assessment Team) grant

Sustainability Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council proposal for the 2009 AIA SDAT (Sustainable Design Assessment Team) grant

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  • 1. The Sustainability Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council is the applicant for this proposal. As an advisory Council to Los Angeles City Hall, the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council represents all downtown stakeholders. The Sustainability Committee is working to develop a community greening “toolkit” that any stakeholder can use to contribute positively to a greener urban environment. In response to the downtown neighborhood’s steady revitalization, the Sustainability Committee wants to identify resources and programs available to the public, develop a program of outreach and community education, and encourage public participation through the development of this strategy. Tenants, residents, workers, business owners, and the homeless should be involved throughout the process. The Sustainability Committee will provide support to the Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) process while developing an outreach strategy to facilitate the implementation of the SDAT plan with public consensus. The SDAT process will help the growing community of Downtown Los Angeles develop with the benefit of sustainable practices to ensure the public health of this and future generations. The Neighborhood Council system is intended to reach the community at the grassroots level and it is supported by the City Council of Los Angeles. The Mayor, City Council, and State of California have recently launched several new sustainability programs and there is a need for public outreach and education. How does our community access these programs and implement their benefits for a cleaner, more livable city? Substantial clusters of cultural attractions, artists and galleries, and new pockets of residential development have changed the scope of the issues we face as an urban environment and creative solutions are necessary to enhance this influx of density. The SDAT process will provide us with a comprehensive understanding of how to manage the transformation of our neighborhood and maximize the potential community benefits of this growth. The SDAT process will provide guidance to the Sustainability Committee and Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council as it facilitates community collaboration and partnership to meet the needs of stakeholders in a pedestrian-oriented, sustainable urban environment. Downtown Los Angeles: Community-driven change Downtown Los AnGeles Center for Communities by Design 2009 Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) Program Proposal community-driven change
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS click section header to link to page Community Description Problem Statement & Issues Analysis Local Capacity & Resources Budget & Funding Educational Partners Community & Outreach SDAT Project Timeline Partnerships & Support Appendix A: Maps & Photos Appendix B: Planning Downtown Los AnGeles Center for Communities by Design 2009 Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) Program Proposal community-driven change Proposal Contact: Ashley Zarella, LEED AP, Assoc. AIA … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 756 S. Broadway, #1107 Director, Area-Wide Work-Force, Private Sector Los Angeles, CA 9 0 0 1 4 Chair, Sustainability Committee Telephone: 917-974-1891 Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council, 2008-2010 Email: ashley.zarella@dlanc.com 
  • 3. Downtown Los Angeles is a uniquely diverse community within a 498.3 square mile city. The City of Los Angeles developed as a multi-center city with nodes of urban activity linked by suburban development and highways. The population grew around the missions and ranchos of the past, rail infrastructure, and now highways creating the second largest city in the country with over 3.8 million people. Considered the historical center of the city, the Downtown Los Angeles community includes a multitude of distinct neighborhoods including: Spring Street Financial District, Broadway Theater and Commercial District, Arts District, Civic Center, El Pueblo, Gallery Row, Fashion District, Financial District, Toy District, Jewelry District, Bunker Hill, Chinatown, South Park, Old Bank District, Historic Core, Skid Row, Central City West, and Little Tokyo. The development of downtown has shifted south and west a few blocks from the original 1781 city center, Olvera Street, which is between the Civic Center and Chinatown and maintains its pedestrian orientation. The mid-century brought a boom of lavish development to Downtown Los Angeles as a center of agriculture and industrial businesses. The 1970s would follow with high vacancy rates, vagrancy and crime. Many of the major corporations previously headquartered downtown moved to new urban nodes within Los Angeles (e.g. Century City). The physical transformation of downtown community description was on hold. The middle class residential population soon left too, looking for cheap suburban housing built throughout the sprawling metropolitan area. Several banks remained downtown, however, and concentrated in the Bunker Hill area. Other service-oriented businesses began opening downtown, bringing a new workforce to the neighborhood. In recent years the downtown Los Angeles neighborhood has seen dramatic changes as a new and growing residential population has moved in. New construction and the 1999 adaptive reuse ordinance have brought substantial improvements to existing vacant buildings while attracting additional services to the neighborhood. Several historic banking headquarters have been rehabilitated into luxury apartments and new live-work loft spaces attract young creative professionals. A large influx of artists have converted previously abandoned storefronts and buildings into gallery space and several new restaurants and small stores have opened in some districts of the neighborhood. Art Walk, a community-driven program, brings thousands of people to the streets of the Historic Core the third Thursday of the month as vacant storefronts are illuminated by art, light and a pedestrian crowd. In just two years there was a 20% increase in the population of Downtown LA to 28,878 residents (2007). With the number of units under construction, it was anticipated that the 2015 target of 40,000 residents would be met by the end of this year. However, even as people began moving downtown, the number of jobs has decreased with the outsourcing of service sector jobs and depleted consumer population. The disproportionate number of jobs to residents downtown indicates a large commuter population that vacates the city after work and most weekends. The number of jobs has decreased, with more than 187,000 less jobs than the 1995 high of 605,000 jobs. With 243,217 of 418,000 jobs downtown, the majority of employment opportunities are in the public sector (government jobs).1 Adjacent to a pocket of recent development in the Historic Core and Little Tokyo, the Skid Row SDAT Application and homeless community faces multiple sociopolitical challenges, including access to services, affordability of housing, and opportunities for nearby, sustainable, and living wage jobs. With so Los Angeles Downtown Center Business Improvement District, The Downtown Los Angeles Market Report & 2006 Demo- 1 graphic Survey of New Downtown Residents (February 2007), http://www.downtownla.com/pdfs/econ_developments/  DCBID_Report-2005.pdf click here to return to table of contents
  • 4. many living on the streets, public health and safety are important and real local concerns. Actual numbers are difficult to predict. According to the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD), on September 3, 2008 there were approximately 177 women and 712 men sleeping on the few blocks of Skid Row with thousands more in area shelters. In 2006, the Washington Post reported more than 6,000 people on the streets of downtown.2 With the recent economic downturn there has been an influx of people, including families, moving into Skid Row. Here the public streets of an industrial neighborhood serve as the concrete backdrop to a transient population stuck on the streets of our nation’s second largest city. Single resident-occupied (SRO) transitional housing offers some assistance but there is a need to develop options for families and women with children for whom housing is nearly impossible to find. On April 27, 2002, the Los Angeles City Council certified the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council per the 1999 city charter revisions. The Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council has been working to represent anyone who lives, works, or owns a business in downtown. The 28-member Board of Directors is elected every two years, representing a range of stakeholders and works with a $50,000 per annum city-provided budget. Overseen by the City of Los Angeles Department of Neighborhood Empowerment (DONE), the mission of the Neighborhood Council is: To unite the diverse communities of Downtown Los Angeles and to provide an innovative forum for all community stakeholders to contribute to a healthy, vibrant, and inclusive downtown. Downtown Los Angeles falls within Council District 9 (Jan Perry) and Council District 11 (Jose Huizar) with active council offices in the neighborhood. Elected in 1991 and 2005 respectively, Councilmembers Perry and Huizar have developed great opportunities for sustainability downtown. Perry has actively supported more parks and open space and has helped made community-driven initiatives a success. Huizar has championed the Bringing Back Broadway initiative which plans to restore the highest concentration of historic theaters in the country, reintroduce the streetcar downtown, and expand sidewalks for a pedestrian-friendly environment. There have been substantial revitalization efforts downtown by both the private and public sector with the launch of major civic projects, master planning and park proposals, and large entertainment and residential development projects promising to transform the 1970s-1980s era commercial office tower skyline. For their success, these projects need the support of both sectors and the existing community. However, significant outreach is necessary to build consensus and disseminate information about existing programs to all. These major projects, combined with the organic transformation of districts such as Gallery Row, have increased construction employment downtown. Workers now have the option of choosing to live within walking distance from their job. As a center of business, international trade, entertainment, culture, media, fashion, science, technology and education, Downtown’s transformation is at a critical juncture in its history. In 2007, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the City Council championed major changes in downtown area zoning. These changes, along with improvements to building codes, allow for larger, denser developments downtown. Open space requirements are waived, however, for larger buildings with 15% low-income units which introduces additional challenges this neighborhood faces as it prepares for an influx of residents. In light of the massive transformation of our neighborhood, how do we create an environment that is amenable to the pedestrian lifestyle, with a healthy balance of green open space to urban density? The Sustainability Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council represents people who live, work, and/or own a business in our neighborhood and have expressed the desire to develop a community greening strategy. Launched in October 2008, the Sustainability Committee is now working to plan and execute a “toolkit” that any stakeholder can use to 2 Pomfret, John, “Downtown Los Angeles Gets a $10 Billion Remake” (Washington Post, January 2, 2006)  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/01/01/AR2006010101086.html click here to return to table of contents
  • 5. contribute to a greener urban environment. In response to the neighborhood transformation, the Sustainability Committee wants to identify resources and programs available to the public, develop a program of outreach and community education, and encourage public participation throughout the development of this strategy and execution. The entire process will be designed to include tenants, workers, business owners, and the homeless throughout the process. The Sustainability Committee will work through partnership and collaboration to enhance community outreach through other organizations with common goals. Much of the recent success of Downtown Los Angeles is attributed to the organic nature of its transformation. Buildings are rehabilitated, people move to live or work here, they then decide to do everything Downtown, creating new patches of revitalized pedestrian activity. Large community events, a high concentration of cultural attractions, and the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council have contributed to our rehabilitation and growth. This grant would support work already underway while enabling us to focus on the implementation strategies and recommendations of the Sustainable Design Assessment Team for a more sustainable future downtown. Although the proposed site area is just the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council area, this proposal and outcomes will be shared with other Neighborhood Council across Los Angeles to enhance the potential impact this process can bring to our entire City. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Short List of Planning and/or Revitalization Projects (hyperlinks are embedded): Barker Block 1010 Wilshire Canvas LA Chapman Flats Exposition Boulevard light rail Judson Lofts Union Lofts Metro Gold Line Extension LAPD headquarters Metro 417 CleanTech Manufacturing Ctr. LA River Revitalization The Great Republic Lofts Pegasus Apartments Civic Center Park Rowan Lofts The Roosevelt Rainbow Apartments Bringing Back Broadway LA Live Midnight Mission MTA Regional Connector Park Fifth Grand Avenue Project Evo South Colburn School for Performing Arts SB1818/SB435 Density Bonus ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… From the February 2007 report by the Los Angeles Downtown Center Business Improvement District: The Downtown Los Angeles Market Report & 2006 Demographic Survey of New Downtown Residents. A new study is underway to track ongoing demographic changes. Age: Median age was 31 years with Household size: Slightly more than half Location of Employment: More than 25.6% of Downtown residents between of Downtown households were made half (55.1%) of respondents surveyed 23-29 years of age. up of single persons (50.2%), while said they either work in the Central Gender: There were slightly more male 42.6% of households were made of two Business District or Greater Downtown residents (53.5% vs. 46.5% female) in persons and the remaining 7.2% three Los Angeles, followed by 22.4% in or more persons. Average: 1.6 people Westside Los Angeles (e.g. Hollywood, Downtown. per household. Wilshire, Santa Monica) compared to Ethnicity: Caucasian/whites accounted 24% in 2004. for 53.2% of the residents. Asian/Pacific Household Income: Median household islanders were the second largest income for households with at least Employment Sectors: The largest group at 24.9%, followed by Hispanics/ one income earner was $99,600 in the private-sector employment category in Latinos at 10.1% and African-American 2006 survey, compared with $96,300 Downtown was professional, scientific in 2004. and technical services, with a 2005 at 5.3%. average of 27,242 workers. This sector Marital Status: More than 60% of Rent vs. Own: The survey revealed that also had one of the highest average Downtown households were made up 62.6% of the units were rented, while annual wage levels, $94,236, among 30.2% are owned by the residents. of single persons. Downtown residents. Some residents (e.g., consultants on Origins: In 2006, 24.3% moved from temporary assignment) do not pay for Job Function: From the survey, 22.7% the Greater Westside of the County. their housing. of the residents were in professional, SDAT Application The next largest demographic group scientific and technical services. 20.7% (16.9%) moved from outside California Primary Residence: An overwhelming were in arts and entertainment and compared to 19.3% in 2004. About majority (89.1%) of respondents 10.6% were employed in educational 13.0% moved from elsewhere to considered Downtown to be their and health services. primary residence. Downtown.  click here to return to table of contents
  • 6. 00.1999 Staples Center opens and hosts four professional sports teams 00.2002 $190M Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels opens, designed by Rafael Moneo 00.2003 Walt Disney Concert Hall, designed 00.2003 Los Angeles Grand Avenue Authority by Frank Gehry established to manage $3 billion development 11.2004 Los Angeles approves $500M for waterway compliance with Federal Clean Water Act 09.2005 Construction starts on 5.6 million sq.ft. L.A. LIVE mixed-use development 09.2005 Historic Downtown LA Retail Project helps 20 businesses open, 139 find funding 03.2008 Bringing Back Broadway initiative is launched 06.2008 State of California Assembly authorizes 06.2007 Two tower Park Fifth condo project with $26.4M in funds for Downtown Civic Park $10M commitment for Pershing Square improvements 09.2008 CRA/LA releases RFP for 10.2007 Nokia Theater, with 7,100-seat theater, Cleantech Redevelopment Strategy opens at L.A. Live 10.2008 Dept. of Parks & Recreation approves 10.2007 Arts District building, the Barker Block funds to renovate Gladys Park in Skid Row 10.2008 CRA/LA approves $5M for 05.2008 Chapman Flats opens as 168 rental units, Broadway street car revival adaptive re-use of 1925 bank condo project 11.2008 Staples Center installs photovoltaics on 11.2008 Mayor’s Green Building Program: LEED nearly 24,000 sq.ft. of roof compliance for developments over 50,000 sq.ft. 00.2009 Angels Flight, world’s shortest railway, scheduled to reopen after 2001 closure 10.2009 New 500,000 sq.ft. LEED-compliant LAPD Headquarters to open, by AECOM Design  click here to return to table of contents
  • 7. The Sustainability Committee seeks to develop a community greening strategy for downtown and early discussions have identified the need to develop a livable city that offers accessibility to a clean pedestrian environment and diverse housing for a neighborhood disproportionately supporting a large, non-residential working population and homeless population. By working with the community, we want to offer all stakeholders, whether they live, work or own a business, more sustainable choices for a healthier urban environment. Through education and empowerment, the Sustainability Committee envisions a future downtown with green open space, fewer homeless on the streets, and a diversity that allows people to live a pedestrian lifestyle, within walking distance of their homes, jobs, cultural attractions, schools, and amenities. Downtown Los Angeles has evolved steadily in recent years with emergent pockets of vibrant pedestrian activity. Developers of various sizes opt to restore existing and often historical buildings or build new towers. Each project spurs another nearby development and a plethora of businesses and restaurants continue to open to service the new residential population. Downtown has become a cultural destination with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Disney Concert Hall, Mark Taper Auditorium, and the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) within a ten block radius (See Appendix A). As more projects are introduced, develop, and then open, problem statement & issues analysis the influx of a residential population presents us with new challenges we must address as a community. There have been several major initiatives on the behalf of the City of Los Angeles and the State of California in recent years, introducing new programs, services, and development opportunities to encourage sustainability in our urban centers. The issues are complex, however, and there is a great need for public outreach and education to help our neighborhood understand what is available for all stakeholders. As a community, we should find a comprehensive approach to sustainability planning, enhance the resources we have with greater efficiency, and establish a plan for more open space in our neighborhood as it rapidly transforms. Environmental C O M M U N I T Y - D R I V E N I N I T I A T I V E S F O R E N E R G Y E F F I C I E N C Y : Downtown’s revitalization has included the rehabilitation of existing buildings, new construction and street improvement projects. With revitalization comes the opportunity to commit to a greener environment in Downtown Los Angeles as a community. Our community should be empowered to make choices regarding the source of our energy and how efficiently it is used. It will take the commitment of communities across the region to make city and state regulations effective but changes must occur at the local level for any regional impact to be made. The Sustainability Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council is submitting this application because we hope to identify and develop tools for a public outreach with the professional, objective guidance of the SDAT team as we plan for a greener community. Currently there are efforts on the behalf of the private sector to improve energy efficiency. For instance, The Nokia Theater, Staples Center and LA Live are installing photovoltaics to SDAT Application offset energy consumption with solar power. Located in South Park, this downtown arts and entertainment destination could potentially educate thousands of visitors a year about on- site power generation and clean energy. This project will provide valuable learnings for other downtown developments and the market for green power. The Sustainability Committee would  click here to return to table of contents
  • 8. like to engage the community and inform them of existing services and programs that help reduce operating costs (less waste), improve community welfare, or enhance existing qualities of downtown. The SDAT process will help us identify how we might advance our commitment as a committee to sustainability to our neighborhood at large. We represent a broad range of stakeholders and hope to increase the number of people involved in the future of our community as a sustainable urban environment. Bringing Back Broadway is a plan to preserve historic theaters and buildings along a major downtown corridor. However, for this proposal to be most successful, the support of Councilmember Huizar and the Historic Downtown Business Improvement District (HDBID) must be complimented by local business investment and community engagement. Therefore, the community need to understand what resources are available to them and how to economically and practically address sustainability. The community needs tools we can all use to improve energy efficiency so we can encourage our city leaders to maintain and advance these goals on a more regional level. By developing a comprehensive community greening strategy, the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council can foster participation through partnership and outreach to downtown stakeholders while improving our energy efficiency. We would like to ask SDAT: How can we design our neighborhood as empty blocks are steadily filling up to improve our energy demand and avoid potential brownouts? The SDAT process could help the Sustainability Committee define best practices and community goals while addressing some of the contributing factors to the urban heat island effect in Downtown Los Angeles. A I R Q U A L I T Y - A R E G I O N A L / L O C A L P R O B L E M : One approach to reducing cooling loads is to design buildings suited for natural ventilation. As a community, we need to develop a strategy for improving air quality downtown. We should address how to reduce massive cooling loads, minimize the urban heat island effect, and establish an environment where natural ventilation is a clean option when ventilating a residential or commercial building. Most of pockets of vitality and growth downtown are surrounded by blocks of dirty, unfriendly concrete sidewalks, wide streets to accommodate 4+ lanes of traffic, and nearly vacant storefronts and buildings. Few trees line the streets of downtown and the lack of shade exacerbates the urban heat island effect. Downtown temperatures are often 12-15°F warmer than outlying suburbs, making it uncomfortable to walk around on warmer days. Because of its location in the Los Angeles Basin, emissions from regional automobile use and smog from the Los Angeles/Long Beach port creates a major public health problem. Atmospheric inversion occurs when exhaust is caught in the air. Los Angeles only has 15 inches of rainfall per year so there is no purge of the pollution and the roads and sidewalks downtown are slick with soot after even the lightest rain. The State of California has tried to mitigate air quality concerns through the early passage of legislation such as the Clean Air Act. In 2006, Assembly Bill 32 (AB32) was passed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 (a 30% reduction). AB32 supports green- tech business development and promotes public health. AB32 also links emissions to land use planning and transportation. As the center of public transit in the region, downtown Los Angeles has a significant opportunity to reduce sprawl by increasing residential development in its core to offset development on the urban fringe, changing travel patterns for thousands of people from a single occupancy vehicle to alternative modes (including by foot). In January 2009, the Air Resources Board will adopt a plan “indicating how emission reductions will be achieved from significant sources of GHGs via regulations, market mechanisms and other actions.” A series of public workshops will follow to share the strategy and explain each proposed measure. Legislation such as AB32 will provide our community with a larger framework for improving air quality but many steps still need to happen at the local level to ensure the community participates.  click here to return to table of contents
  • 9. The success of these state-mandated initiatives is contingent on a locally-grown cultural shift towards conservation and efficiency at the neighborhood level. AB32 assumes that, on a per- capita basis, every man, woman and child in California will have to reduce annual emissions by 4 tons per person by 2020. Until we can shift our behavior on the local level, we will continue to face the same regional problems as other urban nodes across Los Angeles. The Sustainability Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council will be assessing the existing and under-utilized programs available to stakeholders downtown to take action towards a more sustainable neighborhood and improving air quality. The SDAT report will help us establish priorities and opportunities to enhance these programs while creating a framework for new programs to fill the gaps for a comprehensive approach on the community level. Social P U B L I C S P A C E : The potential for density downtown with its existing building stock and open lots supports the vision for a pedestrian-oriented community and neighborhood. To offset the density of the neighborhood, cool open space is necessary and the community wants dog parks, green space, and shade. To promote community health and interaction, shared open space can create connection and social networking for the neighborhood. However, our primary open space, our streets, are not built or maintained to capture this potential. One of the challenges of open space in the past has been the very large homeless population of Downtown Los Angeles. Benches and shade is rare downtown and homeless people congregate in the few parks of the community or wherever shade can be found during the hottest days of the year. For security reasons, people are discouraged from loitering in public spaces and there are few places for community congregation. We need a plan to create shared space that we can all use and enjoy. Pershing Square has a history of poor planning and bad design decisions. Years of reworking and redesign have failed to remedy the park’s poor visibility and connection with the community. “These days,” reports the LA Times, “the park again seems one step behind the changing downtown.”3 This park is managed by an organization, however, which is currently working to develop and host both day and evening programming in support of the growing residential population. Unfortunately, this park has become the example of poor planning and management of open space downtown and few alternatives are available. Quimby fees are collected from developers and are designated for new parks and open space or existing park maintenance and improvements. Of the millions of dollars collected from downtown development, there is no new open space to offset the density introduced downtown by these projects. The City of Los Angeles Parks & Recreation Department, in response to a public outcry, is currently reviewing its ordinances and internal policies to enhance how Quimby fees are allocated and used as intended. Mandated by the State, there is nearly $12.6 million in unused Quimby Fees available for parks and open space development downtown. The increase in density is attributed mainly to the influx of young professionals and the conversion of industrial and commercial space into creative environments. While some areas of downtown continue to offer affordable leasing opportunities, the cost of housing is increasing with the introduction of more luxury condominiums. Some buildings planning to sell units have recently shifted to rentals to accommodate the changing marketplace and the economy continues to present better deals for residents with a good income. The Downtown Central Business Improvement District is currently running a demographic survey to better understand the changing residential population and identify community interest in bringing services and stores to the neighborhood. Public consensus continues to appreciate the need SDAT Application for parks and opens space and the SDAT team can help us identify how to design a more sustainable neighborhood as downtown transforms block by block. There is an additional opportunity for public education about the City of Los Angeles green DiMassa, Cara Mia, “Another go-around for L.A.’s Pershing Square” (Los Angeles Times, October 31, 2008) 3  http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-pershing31-2008oct31,0,2100603.story?page=1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 10. building program (effective 11/01/08) requiring all developments greater than 50,000 square feet to be LEED-compliant. The public will benefit most from this program if they understand how it impacts the future of the neighborhood and if it is a practical solution to an environmental problem. The Green Building Program presents new opportunities for innovation in sustainable design and how it evolves will have a significant impact on the future of the City of Los Angeles. Coupled with state regulations, Los Angeles is an incubator developing new techniques and materials for more energy-efficient buildings and improved air quality. With its rapid development and physical transformation, Downtown Los Angeles is an incubator for sustainability with an unique opportunity for the community to adopt sustainable practices and foster a pedestrian- oriented urban environment. The concentration of attractions and cultural heritage also makes Downtown Los Angeles a tourist attraction where visitors can stay in a hotel and walk around the neighborhood. Local public transit is affordable at 25¢/ride. The DASH connects several of these pedestrian pockets to centers of government and banking. There are plans to introduce downtown DASH service in the evening to serve the new residential population. Union Station is a regional transit hub with easy access to airports, other cities, and inter-urban connections such as bus and light rail to other nodes and neighborhoods throughout Los Angeles. It is time to focus on means of enhancing the pedestrian experience downtown as it remains accessible to places further away by a number of transit options. Downtown Los Angeles needs to transform some of its hardscapes into clean, shady public spaces. As with any urban center, garbage accumulates and must be managed for good public health. Around downtown, litter is troublesome and the Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) and homeless brigades can be seen cleaning some of the streets in the neighborhood. Non-profit organizations such as Chrysalis have created employment opportunities for the homeless with their waste management and recycling programs for area buildings. Litter on the sidewalks make trash receptacles of the storm drains, collecting garbage and flooding during heavy rainfall (it has only rained 16.4 inches in the past two years). The Bureau of Sanitation for the City of Los Angeles is developing a multi-year plan for a citywide zero-waste plan to eliminate 90% of solid waste. The planning process is inclusive with public workshops hosted around Los Angeles each month. Not only is it important to be involved in the planning process, our community must learn about the outcomes and what steps should be taken to improve our urban environment for a more sustainable future. In order for this plan to work, there must a significant public commitment to changing how we live and work. How do we reach out to a diverse group of businesses, tenants, property owners, social service providers, and homeless to encourage compliance with a zero-waste strategy and accessibility to services? For parks to offset density and enhance public health, we must maintain our public spaces as clean, shady places throughout our neighborhood. We need the help of the SDAT process to develop a plan to create accessible open space for all members of our community. We need a sustainable housing plan to give more people the opportunity to have regular access to a toilet, bed, and nearby services. A C C E S S I B I L I T Y T O D I V E R S E , A F F O R D A B L E H O U S I N G : Downtown Los Angeles has a large homeless population and needs more affordable housing as the cost of rentals in the area increase. The influx of young, educated professionals presents an opportunity to harness creative, community-building energy to enhance the neighborhood through social networking while maintaining affordability. Inevitably, rents will increase in these new pockets of pedestrian activity. This needs to be balanced with the availability of affordable housing, services, and sustainable employment opportunities in the neighborhood. Skid Row is still somewhat removed from the revitalization of downtown although it is adjacent to the successful Historic Core district. Project 50, for instance, is a County of Los Angeles program to identify the 50 most at-risk people on the streets of Los Angeles and bring them into an intensive program to address the plethora of their physical and emotional challenges. 10 click here to return to table of contents
  • 11. The main facilities of Project 50 are located caddy-corner to Pharmaka and other local galleries which have seeded the transformation of this area into Gallery Row. At this intersection, the homeless, residents and businesses interact daily as the nature of these streets change with the arrival of the new residential population. Local business improvement district security keep the homeless off the sidewalks of some streets downtown as they are displaced to the blocks of Skid Row in Central City East. Several hospitals have faced prosecution for illegally dumping homeless patients on these streets of the neighborhood. Skid Row is surrounded by facilities providing various social services and temporary housing options. These facilities offer a variety of options for the homeless and transitional populations. A recent program by the County Sheriff’s office allows for earlier intervention as convicts are released to help move those in need into the appropriate programs and services. Community activists have also succeeded in bringing improvements to the population of Skid Row such as garbage pick-ups and clean-up crews. Community-based activism recently motivated new improvements to the only park in Skid Row, Gladys Park, including a new water line for a clean water fountain and new basketball court which will help the community-organized Skid Row 3-on-3 Basketball League. Additionally, the focus of many of the service providers downtown has shifted form temporary housing to the creation of permanent housing solutions with in- house treatments and services. City Council and the Mayor are working on the city-wide level to address the challenges of such demographic and income shifts. The Mayor recently announced a five-year, $5 billion commitment to build 20,000 affordable housing units in the city to help the struggling middle class. With beautiful existing and even historic buildings, Downtown Los Angeles could potentially convert dozens of vacant building shells into affordable housing with integrated social services to help the homeless population address its many challenges including addiction, mental illness, criminal history, as well as the need for education and job training. It is important that this and all affordable housing schemes provide for a range of mixed income developments that include a range of housing affordability, from market rate to workforce housing and very low income units. The top-down nature of these programs, however, are less sustainable for the community which must live with the outcome. Work must be done at the most local level to ensure the success of these programs. By facilitating a community-driven solution, the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council can help foster the necessary public and private partnerships necessary for success. The neighborhood council can support the SDAT process through community outreach, feedback, and consensus-building. The most successful public policy for sustainability will be the result of a didactic process where the community is involved in the outcome. The SDAT will provide our neighborhood with a report informing us of ways and means to meet these objectives. Remediating and reusing existing structures, for instance, provides opportunity for the neighborhood to address the challenges of changing demographics and respective income levels. By facilitating the provision of more affordable housing to the most at-risk members of the community and as a whole, a better-informed Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council will work with community leaders as they develop their strategies and tactics at their respective level of authority. By introducing more open space, Downtown Los Angeles will be able to support increased density by offsetting the physical challenges of high-rise living and work environments with public space that meets the diverse needs of this community. Economic SDAT Application P U B L I C S E R V I C E S : Economic turmoil has made households and businesses concerned about finances while social service providers on Skid Row prepare for an influx of unemployed and displaced persons on the streets. How does our mixed-use neighborhood adopt more energy efficient and sustainable practices in a time when people are concerned about their financial security? As the City of Los Angeles looks to cut more than $300M-$400M from our 11 click here to return to table of contents
  • 12. budget this coming year, we must identify key services and programs available through city departments that our community does not want to lose. At the first Sustainability Committee meeting this fall, the Bureau of Sanitation presented its growing list of recycling programs. Many community members expressed concern about the lack of residential recycling downtown. Some buildings have organized collections to help residents recycle. However, there is a multi-family recycling program available to everyone in Los Angeles and anyone, including a tenant, can call to request service. The Bureau of Sanitation offers garbage assessment services to help businesses cut waste and trash fees and consultation services for building management to help set-up residential recycling collection centers. These programs offer substantial opportunity as new buildings open and residents move in. How we use public services will determine their priority as hard budget decisions must be made. The SDAT process can help the Sustainability Committee identify the most effective public services and programs as we address a more pedestrian-friendly, livable downtown. R E V I T A L I Z A T I O N & A C C E S S I B I L I T Y : Downtown’s revitalization has included the rehabilitation of existing buildings, new construction, and ancillary development. Local community activist and member of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Brady Westwater described the situation: “We have to expand the connective tissue of the community, the green space, to make it truly walkable.” How do we identify opportunities for greater public participation in greening our neighborhood? Do we start a green power initiative, for instance, to inform tenants and building owners of their energy source options? Would a more successful program provide energy efficiency tools for tenants in a space they do not own? What are the potential costs and how do we evaluate the benefits on the community level? The Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council has been certified by the City of Los Angeles and City Hall is located in our district affording us valuable opportunities to interact with our City Council and city departments as they develop programming and plans for the future of our metropolitan area. Downtown Los Angeles includes all levels of government with the large numbers of public sector employees. The County of Los Angeles is also currently vetting its update to its General Plan (last updated in 1986) at community outreach meetings throughout the county. This plan and many others reflect the state, county and city-level commitments to sustainability. The Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council will work with the SDAT to establish a mechanism for generating a community-level commitment to sustainable development and practices. This neighborhood has demonstrated capacity for diversity in growth and opportunity through the combination of rehabilitating historical buildings, converting building use, and new sustainable construction. In a neighborhood able to organically support a vibrant pedestrian economy, surface parking lots are concrete gaps in the urban fabric. The sidewalks are black with residue even with the help of successful private programs to clean and enhance the streetscapes. Downtown stakeholders need affordable housing, open space and a comprehensive sustainable strategy for future neighborhood transformation and enhancement. 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 13. The Sustainability Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council will serve as the primary contact for the Sustainable Design Assessment Team. Our committee is new and the list below includes all of the current committee members and their affiliations but new members and associations are getting involved as we continue to develop a community greening strategy. The SDAT Steering Committee will combine members of the Sustainability Committee with other downtown organizations for the broadest possible community representation. local capacity & resources Ashley Zarella, LEED AP, Assoc. AIA Gunnar Hand, AICP Chair, Sustainability Committee Sustainability Committee Member Affordable Housing Committee Member Planning & Land Use Committee Member Director, Areawide Workforce, Private Sector Director, Areawide Workforce, Public Sector Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council AECOM Design (formerly DMJM Design) Los Angeles County Dept. of Regional Planning Designer & LEED AP Senior Regional Planner Architect’s Newspaper Architect’s Newspaper Contributor Contributor 756 S. Broadway, #1107 756 S. Broadway, #1107 Los Angeles, CA 90014 Los Angeles, CA 90014 917-974-1891 816-916-6304 ashley.zarella@dlanc.com gunnar.hand@dlanc.com Jennifer Regan Winston Hoy Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Downtown Resident AEG Administration Manager, Sustainability Programs BraveNewBus www.bravenewbus.org 714 W. Olympic Blvd., Suite 301 Founder Los Angeles, CA 90015 213-763-5451 Los Angeles, CA 90014 jregan@aegworldwide.com 727-543-5633 bravenewbus@gmail.com Heidi Johnson Michael Hoy Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Downtown Resident Green Age Marketing www.greenagemarketing.com BraveNewBus Marketing Director www.bravenewbus.org Founder Los Angeles, CA SDAT Application 323-204-7246 Los Angeles, CA 90014 heidi@greenagemarketing.com 818-395-4779 bravenewbus@gmail.com 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 14. Joe Lucas Suzanne Robinson Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member BuildLACCD United States Green Building Council www.laccdbuildsgreen.org www.usgbc.org LA Chapter intern 915 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 810 Los Angeles, CA 90017 Los Angeles, CA 213-996-2234 213-689-9707 joe.lucas@build-laccd.org suzanne.robinson@usgbc-la.org Jill N. Willis General Jeff Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Best Best & Krieger, Attorneys at Law Director, Central City East & Skid Row Residents Partner Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council 300 South Grand Ave., 25th Floor Issues & Solutions Los Angeles, CA 90071 Community Organzier 213-787-2558 Los Angeles, CA jill.willis@bbklaw.com issuesandsolutions@yahoo.com Tanner Blackman Henry Proctor Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Planning & Land Use Committee Member Director, Homeless City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Planner Assistant The Art of Cleaning APA LA (American Planning Association) Company owner University Liaison Los Angeles, CA Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-392-2286 tannerblackman@yahoo.com henry.proctor@dlanc.com Ron Crockett Adam Tischer Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Fun Zone Reading Club CB Richard Ellis Huntington Hotel Associate, Brokerage Services & Downtown Urban Redevelopment Team 512 S.Main St., Los Angeles, CA 90013 626-676-6919 Los Angeles, CA ron.crockett@yahoo.com 213-613-3020 adam.tischer@cbre.com Alex Brideau III Alexander Sexsmith Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Los Angeles Housing Department Perkins+Will City of Los Angeles Designer Management Analyst 617 W. 7th Street, Suite 1200 Rotary International, Member Los Angeles, CA 90017 213-270-8400 Los Angeles, CA alexander.sexsmith@perkinswill.com alika@brideau.net Andre Krause, LEED AP Ariadne Shaffer Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Alternate, Areawide Workforce, Private Sector The Library Inc. Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Bookkeeper Los Angeles, CA 453 S. Spring Street, Suite 601 310-594-2125 Los Angeles, CA 90013 akrause409@hotmail.com 213-985-4225 ariadne@librarybookkeeping.com Athenel Ocampo Dorian Dudley Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Quatro Design Group Greenscape global (green roofs) Designer Founder 923 E 3rd Street, Suite 112 Los Angeles, CA Los Angeles, CA 90013 agreener2008@gmail.com 213-625-1995 athenel.ocampo@gmail.com 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 15. Stanley Michaels James Rojas Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Director, Resident Civic Center Los Angeles County Metro Transit Authority Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Transportation Planner Angelus Plaza Latino Urban Forum 255 S. Hill Street Founder Los Angeles, CA 90012 Gallery 727 213-623-4352 727 S. Spring Street stanleymichaels@hotmail.com Los Angeles, CA 90014 rojasj@metro.net Jon Toktas Katie Ricketts Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Business Director, Downtown Center Heath and Lejeune Inc. Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Sustainability Management Ardas Cafe P.O. Box 21387 Business Owner Los Angeles, CA 90021 213-614-1909 418 W. 6th Street katie@soullyorganic.com Los Angeles, CA 90014 jtoktas@gmail.com Leah Ross Megs Hey Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Lawyer Ciudad Public Relations & Marketing Manager Los Angeles, CA geemeg@gmail.com 445 Figueroa Street Los Angeles, CA 90071 leah@bordergrill.com Natalia Aguilar Sonia Prasad Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Los Angeles, CA Artist & Downtown Resident kartagraphix@yahoo.com Los Angeles, CA sonia_prasad@hotmail.com Veronica Siranosian Ginny-Marie Case Sustainability Committee Member Sustainability Committee Member Los Angeles County Dept. of Regional Planning The Robert Group (TRG) Regional Planner Project Manager, Public Relations Los Angeles, CA Los Angeles, CA vsiranosian@planning.lacounty.gov 323-699-9100 ginny@ginnycase.com SDAT Application 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 16. budget & funding The Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council receives $50,000 per year in funding from the City of Los Angeles and is regulated by DONE (Department of Neighborhood Empowerment). In its first year, the Sustainability Committee has $1,500 available over three quarters with no prior commitments for spending. Due to the diversity of the committee and representation of stakeholders, there is substantial access to in-kind services such as work space, meeting space, supplies and photocopying, advertising, local transportation, media and communications, and catering. In addition to the Sustainability Committee, there are several committees which could provide valuable resources to the SDAT such as the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Planning & Land Use Committee, Economic Development Committee, Parks, Recreation & Open Space Committee, Public Health and Safety Committee, Transportation Committee, Affordable Housing & Homeless Committee, and Education Committee. Each of these committees has additional resources for the provision of the required budget and funding for this proposal. The Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council has some limitations regulated by DONE on how money can be collected or transferred and donors do not receive the tax incentives for their donation. We can, however, organize in-kind donations from the broad-base of the community which we represent with efficiency and transparency. Fiscal accountability will be a primary condition for all program costs and will be included in a report on the process by the Sustainability Committee. Lessons learned will be documented and shared with other neighborhood councils for future implementation in other urban nodes of Los Angeles. For the recent Park[ing] Day LA, the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council raised more than $1,000 in cash and in-kind donations for a block party with only a few weeks of planning. The Sustainability Committee is confident it will meet its financial obligations in support of the SDAT funding and program needs. 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 17. educational par tner s As part of our work, the Sustainability Committee is dedicated to public education and outreach. In collaboration with the Education Committee, the Sustainability Committee will identify opportunities for partnerships with local grade schools, high schools, and post-secondary institutions. There are several local high schools with community service programs and the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council would be able to make arrangements for their involvement. City Year, a non-profit organization that gets high school seniors involved in civic programs, recently approached the neighborhood council for opportunities for involvement. We hope to develop outreach and public education programs with these schools and their students in mind as we believe it is valuable to have youth make an informed commitment to sustainability through service. Southern California Institute for Architecture (SCI-Arc) is located in the downtown neighborhood and the Sustainability Committee will establish opportunities to include both graduate and undergraduate students of architecture in the SDAT process. We have opportunities through our committee membership to reach out to planning and urban design students at the University of Southern California and engage them in the process of developing a community greening strategy. As a committee, we are focused on education as a priority and plan to engage these institutions, as well as professional organizations such as the AIA and APA (American Planning Association), throughout the process of developing and implementing the final plan. SDAT Application 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 18. 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 19. The Sustainability Committee will develop a communication strategy that reaches the broadest number of stakeholders. Currently, the Sustainability Committee is supported by a blog but will soon be replaced with a more functional website to facilitate not only public commentary but community information, educational and searchable resources, a database of existing public services to facilitate better practices, as well as a public record of the activities of the Sustainability Committee and SDAT. The Sustainability Committee will invite community stakeholders and leaders to be included on the SDAT Steering Committee which will work as a subcommittee of the Sustainability Committee. All recommendations by the Sustainability Committee must be approved by the Board of Directors before any action is taken. The Steering Committee will be given some flexibility in its decision-making as long as the decision is aligned with Board-approved criteria. The Steering Committee will work with the Sustainability Committee to develop outreach strategies, develop a database of contacts, and help recruit local volunteers with relevant experience in public relations for advisement. Downtown Los Angeles has a multitude of weblogs that reach a large number of downtown stakeholders. Some of these blogs cover a variety of Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council events and meetings and a system of coordinated outreach will ensure that they receive communication & outreach information in a timely manner with full disclosure of our activities as we plan for a more sustainable downtown. The Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council also utilizes local listservs which are an effective means of announcing meetings, programs, or other activities around the neighborhood. In addition to online media, there are several weekly downtown newspapers in addition to the city-wide Los Angeles Times. The Downtown News and Garment & Citizen are two free weeklies that cover a multitude of issues downtown and are distributed throughout the area. ECO-LA is a city-wide publication that is specifically targeted to environmentally-conscious Angelinos and has already volunteered to cover the SDAT process in support of the work of the Sustainability Committee. (see online: http://downtownsustainability.blogspot.com). The Sustainability Committee will help develop procedures for press releases and notifications to ensure efficient communication and a clear message. The Sustainability Committee will soon elect a public co-chair who will work with Ashley Zarella, LEED AP, Assoc. AIA and Director, Area-Wide Workforce, Private Sector of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council. The Co-Chairs will be members of the Steering Committee and be considered primary project contacts. The Sustainability Committee will make recommendations for any additional project spokespersons for final approval by the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Board of Directors. The President is the spokesperson for the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council per the bylaws and should be the primary contact for matters related to the full council. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… List of Local Media Online blogdowntown.com, www.angelenic.com, www.laist.com, www.viewfromaloft.com, SDAT Application www.lacurbed.com, www.lavoice.com, www.la.streetsblog.com Downtown News (www.downtownnews.com), Los Angeles Garment & Citizen (www. Print garmentandcitizen.com), Los Angeles Times (www.latimes.com), Architect’s Newspaper (www.architectsnewspaper.com) 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 20. 2008 Sustainability Committee SDAT November • Submit SDAT Application • Determine committee objectives and finalize mission statement • Presentation from Mayor’s Office on Green Building Program (K.Kline) December • Gap assessment to understand • AIA Communities by Design reviews existing programs/services and applications needs • Launch initial website to replace blog (http://downtownsustainability. blogspot.com) with resource center, community feedback, events, and other topics of interest. • Identify community partners with similar goals SDAT project timeline 2009 Sustainability Committee SDAT January • Gap assessment to continue and sustainability committee to identify projects for 2009 • Begin neighborhood survey for needs assessment • Presentation by author of The Urban Homestead on sustainable living in urban environments February • Develop outreach strategy and curriculum for SDAT launch and project (town hall meetings, stakeholder-specific meetings, district-specific, etc.) with criteria for success and regular evaluation March • Launch “low-hanging fruit” 2009 programs (e.g. bilingual outreach on recycling; tree planting initiative) April • Prepare for SDAT visit and start of community sustainable plan • Announce SDAT Steering • SDAT process begins with initial Committee - to include members of visit by the team. Introductions Sustainability Committee, partner to community leaders, tours of organizations and community neighborhood, and report by leaders Sustainability Committee with • Town hall meeting to introduce additional learnings and background community to the SDAT process and information for the successful encourage participation launch of sustainability planning. May • Evaluate 2009 programs in month • Major issues to be announced 2; make adjustments per learnings June • Develop school programs for Fall 0 click here to return to table of contents
  • 21. July • Develop additional “low-hanging fruit” 2009 programs as a precursor to the community sustainability “toolkit” for all stakeholders (e.g. water and energy conservation techniques, greening the home, and waste management strategies). August • In partnership with the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Education Committee, launch a secondary school outreach program to encourage community activism and awareness about the environment and making better • Interim review with SDAT to choices. determine if we are on track, September • Work with students at SCI-Arc and reevaluate goals, and coordinate USC to develop additional planning progress being made by the team and design strategies as part of the with upcoming projects for the “toolkit,” in particular incentives and Sustainability Committee. recognition for community members who opt to participate. The toolkit is intended to give people who live, work, and own a business downtown easy, affordable ways to reduce their carbon footprint and they should be recognized for participation. October • Continue community outreach and education with a comprehensive communications strategy. November • Launch 2009 holiday-focused programs, in partnership with the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Economic Development Committee, such as a “buy local” to enhance economic sustainability by highlighting downtown (green) retailers, create a program to replace plastic bag use downtown, etc. December • Continue community outreach and education with a comprehensive communications strategy. 2010 Sustainability Committee SDAT January • Evaluate 2009 programs and host meetings for public feedback. • Develop goals for 2010 based on community feedback and needs assessment. February • Prepare for SDAT report/plan by including the community in the • SDAT to present strategy for process, reporting on the work of developing a community greening the Sustainability Committee, and strategy with recommendations on recruit volunteers/partners for how to foster a more pedestrian- the implementation of the SDAT friendly, accessible urban SDAT Application recommendations. environment with better energy efficiency, diverse housing options, March • Host community meetings to share and equal access to public SDAT strategy and learnings, solicit programs. feedback and determine next steps as a neighborhood. 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 22. April • Develop a comprehensive implementation strategy for the community plan in partnership with other organization, community leaders and stakeholders. • Identify and address potential challenges with a transitioning Board of Directors. The Sustainability Committee public co-chair will be responsible for managing the transition through the end of 2010. May • Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council elections (2010-2012) • Continue with the development of a comprehensive implementation strategy for the community plan in partnership with other organization, community leaders and stakeholders. June • Develop a final communications, education and outreach strategy July for a hard launch of the community August sustainability plan in the fall. September • In partnership with the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood October Council, its committees, and other November community partners introduce the downtown sustainability plan with a clear list of goals and action items outlined. December • Provide report back to AIA Communities by Design and make a public presentation on the experience. This should include leadership from other neighborhood councils. The Sustainability Committee was launched this fall to develop a community greening strategy for downtown. We are currently working to identify our objectives for the next two years and the SDAT process will compliment the work currently underway with an even more technical, professional, and objective perspective. The hope is to develop a “toolkit” for community stakeholders (tenants, residents, workers, business owners, and the homeless) with resources and options for healthier, more sustainable choices we can all make on a daily basis. The SDAT process will enable us to address some of the bigger issues we face downtown by identifying additional opportunities for collaboration and optimization of existing programs and services. We hope to share this process and our learnings with other neighborhood councils to encourage more grassroots action towards a sustainable future for the City of Los Angeles.  click here to return to table of contents
  • 23. partnerships & support SDAT Application  click here to return to table of contents
  • 24. November 7, 2008 Ms. Erin Simmons, Director Center for Communities by Design The American Institute of Architects 1735 New York Avenue, NW Washington DC 20006-5292 FOUNDING PLATINUM SPONSORS Hellmuth, Obata+Kassabaum (HOK) P.I.P.E. Trust Fund LA/NECA Bentley Prince Street Re: Sustainable Design Assistance Team Application – Downtown Los Angeles Southern California Edison Neighborhood Council Sustainability Committee ’08-‘09 BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS Dear Ms. Simmons, CHAIR Peter Barsuk Gensler On behalf of USGBC-LA, I would like to offer our support for the Sustainability VICE-CHAIR Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Sustainable Design James Brock Assessment Team (SDAT) grant application. Environmental Planning Associates TREASURER David Summers Downtown Los Angeles is at a critical time of transformation and the SDAT will Glumac provide our community with a valuable framework as we develop our sustainability SECRETARY David Stevens goals for a more livable urban center. We are excited to further our work toward the Southern California Gas Company goal of sustainable development and look forward to this project. DIRECTORS AT-LARGE Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions. We look forward to your Annie Argento Brightworks decision. Claire Bowin City of Los Angeles Sincerely, Dimitris Klapsis HMC Architects Steve Lamar Lance A. Williams Swinerton James Leahy KEMA Services, Inc Lance A. Williams, Ph. D. Brenden McEneaney LEED® Accredited Professional City of Santa Monica Executive Director John Zinner Zinner Consultants EMERGING GREEN BUILDERS Edward Belden Los Angeles and San Gabriel Rivers Watershed Council EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Lance A. Williams, Ph. D.  click here to return to t. 213.689.9707 | f. 213.689.9709 table of contents
  • 25. AIA | Los Angeles A Chapter of The American Institute of Architects Ann Livingston, Esq. Director, AIA Center for Communities by Design SDAT Program Director, Center for Communities by Design The American Institute of Architects 1735 New York Avenue NW Washington, D.C. 20006-5292 RE: LETTER OF SUPPORT – Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) Ms. Livingston: The AIA Los Angeles Chapter is delighted to endorse the SDAT application for The Sustainability Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council (DLANC). We fully support their endeavor to develop a community greening “toolkit” that any Downtown LA stakeholder can use to contribute positively to a greener urban environment. We also recognize the importance of DLANC’s role in serving as an advisory committee to City of Los Angeles’ Council Districts Nine, Fourteen and One. At this juncture for the Los Angeles region, implementing the sustainable design principals of AIA Communities by Design and its values of a Green Urbanism into the vernacular of our communities has become one of our most vitally important objectives. The AIA Los Angeles Chapter looks forward to working with the The Sustainability Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council to adopt principals of sustainability and we look forward to becoming a dynamic resource to provide the leadership to improve the built environment in exactly this manner. Downtown Los Angeles is an exemplary community at the heart of Los Angeles region. It hosts a varied and diverse industry of economic development and prosperity, which reverberates throughout Southern California. It hosts our iconic commercial hub, our historic core, our opportunity for Transit-Oriented- Development, dozens of architecture & design firms (AC Martin Partners, DMJM Design, Harley Ellis Deveraux, Altoon & Porter, ZGF, Perkins & Will, to name just a few), several museums, theaters and cultural centers, as well as, numerous vibrant & lively art galleries, restaurants and music venues. Home to over 28,000 residents (with 40,000 expected by 2015), Downtown Los Angeles’ impact & influence on the Los Angeles area is immense. It is a model community that many other Cities look towards for leadership and urban design savvy. The City of Los Angeles and its neighboring municipalities all intrinsically pour into the Downtown Los Angeles and vice versa. It is for that reason that AIA Los Angeles passionately endorses an SDAT for Downtown Los Angeles– for it will not only benefit the commercial core of Los Angeles but will reverberate throughout the region. Many of the future design challenges that face Downtown Los Angeles are just as relevant for a vast many other communities in the region and the lessons learned from an SDAT for Downtown Los Angeles can easily apply elsewhere. SDAT Application In fact, performing an SDAT for Downtown LA benefits the entire region of Los Angeles andthe entire State of California as a whole. For as the Southern California region continues to expand, develop & multiply, it will be essential, if not imperative, for sustainable design practices to be expeditiously implemented into  AIA Los Angeles 2007 Sponsorship Opportunities | 3780 Wilshire Blvd, Ste. 800 Los Angeles, CA 90010 | 213.639.0777 | www.aialosangeles.org click here to return to table of contents
  • 26. the General Plans, Design Review Guidelines and common everyday practices of all municipalities in the area. The AIA Los Angeles chapter encourages you to support the SDAT Grant Application for The Sustainability Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council and welcomes remaining a vital part of the process. Please feel free to contact me with any additional questions. Very truly yours, Will Wright Director, Legislative Affairs  AIA Los Angeles 2007 Sponsorship Opportunities | 3780 Wilshire Blvd, Ste. 800 Los Angeles, CA 90010 | 213.639.0777 | www.aialosangeles.org click here to return to table of contents
  • 27. CITY OF LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL OFFICERS J. RUSSELL BROWN, PRESIDENT P.O. Box 13096 Los Angeles, CA 90013-0096 BRADY WESTWATER, VP OF ADMINISTRATION TELEPHONE: (213) 488-1901 PATTI BERMAN, VP OF OUTREACH & COMMUNICATION FAX: (213) 341-2382 E-MAIL: Planning@DLANC.com ALEX CHA, TREASURER DLANC Office Coordinator: Ted Greaton ANNA DANIELLE DURAN, SECRETARY November 11, 2008 Ms. Erin Simmons, Director Center for Communities by Design The American Institute of Architects 1735 New York Avenue, NW Washington DC 20006-5292 Re: Sustainable Design Assistance Team Application – Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Sustainability Committee Dear Ms. Simmons, On behalf of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council, I would like to offer our support for our Sustainability Committee’s application for the Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) grant. The Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council has a history of supporting community-based initiatives in a neighborhood that has seen radical transformation in recent years. Many of the positive changes downtown are the result of dedicated community members with a vision and the Neighborhood Council has proudly supported their efforts through various combinations of outreach, partnerships, and financial support. We represent a broad range of stakeholders and are actively engaged in community and city-wide planning efforts as a voice of our neighborhood. We believe the SDAT grant will provide our organization and this community with a valuable understanding of how we can advance the goals of our Sustainability Committee to develop a long-term community greening plan. The Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council is equipped to provide the logistical support and an indepth understanding of our neighborhood throughout the SDAT process and we believe we can maximize the benefits of this opportunity through community outreach, engagement, and education. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions. We look forward to your decision. Sincerely, SDAT Application J. Russell Brown President Approved by the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Board of Directors 11/11/08  click here to return to table of contents
  • 28.  click here to return to table of contents
  • 29. SDAT Application  click here to return to table of contents
  • 30. 0 click here to return to table of contents
  • 31. appendix a: maps & photos Los Angeles Citywide Map of Neighborhood Councils Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council districts Infrastructure - Roads Generalize Land Use - Central City Parks, including Civic Park Cultural attractions (images) Cultural attractions (maps) Historic Buildings of Downtown Los Angeles General Plan Land Use Map - Central City Community Plan Map of Neighborhood Districts: Historic Core New Downtown Civic Center Fashion District Chinatown/Pueblo South Park Wholesale/Skid Row SDAT Application 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 32. NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCILS IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES 5 4 North Valley Area City of 114 San Fernando 101 118 7 10 113 99 9 120 6 112 8 111 LEGEND: 100 22 13 CERTIFIED WITH ELECTED BOARD 23 14 11 19 15 CERTIFIED – ORGANIZING ELECTION 20 CERTIFICATION PENDING 21 24 FORMING 25 South 16 17 Valley 18 28 26 Area 27 40 36 41 West East 30 39 37 29 Area Area 64 42 43 65 102 33 34 32 38 Cities of 44 117 48 West Hollywood Central Area & 47 29 Hollywood Hills West 119 Beverly Hills 55 53 58 30 Hollywood United 63 54 97 32 Central Hollywood 46 104 61 60 76 33 Hollywood Studio District 62 52 66 50 73 34 East Hollywood Central 74 City of 36 Greater Griffith Park 75 Area 77 115 Santa East Area 46 Historic Cultural 67 78 Monica 79 37 Atwater Village 52 Downtown Los Angeles 38 Silver Lake 53 Rampart Village 81 Culver City 82 110 39 Glassell Park 68 54 MacArthur 109 80 40 Eagle Rock 55 Wilshire Center-Koreatown 70 41 Historic Highland Park 58 Mid City WEST South 86 42 Arroyo Seco 60 P.I.C.O. Area 43 Elysian Valley Riverside 76 Pico Union 84 71 44 Greater Echo Park Elysian 97 Westlake 87 47 Lincoln Heights 104 Olympic Park 88 48 LA-32 119 Greater Wilshire 50 Boyle Heights South Valley Area 102 Greater Cypress Park 11 West Hills South Area North Valley Area 90 13 Canoga Park 73 Mid City 4 Granada Hills North Harbor Area 14 Winnetka 74 United Neighborhoods of the 5 Sylmar 90 Harbor Gateway North 15 Reseda Historic Arlington Heights, West 6 Arleta 91 Harbor Gateway South 16 Woodland Hills-Warner Center 7 Pacoima Adams, and Jefferson Park 92 Harbor City 17 Tarzana Communities 8 Sun Valley Area 93 Wilmington 18 Encino 75 West Adams 9 Foothill Trails District 94 Northwest San Pedro 19 West Van Nuys/Lake Balboa 77 Empowerment Congress 10 Sunland-Tujunga 95 Central San Pedro 20 Van Nuys North Area 22 North Hollywood West 91 96 Coastal San Pedro 21 Greater Valley Glen 78 Southeast/Central Ave 99 Chatsworth 23 North Hollywood North East 79 Empowerment Congress 100 Panorama City 24 Mid-Town North Hollywood West Area 101 Mission Hills 25 Valley Village 80 Park Mesa Heights 111 North Hills West 26 Sherman Oaks 81 Empowerment Congress 112 North Hills East 92 Harbor 27 Studio City Central Area 113 Northridge West 93 Area 28 Greater Toluca Lake 82 Vernon/Main 114 Porter Ranch 84 Empowerment Congress 118 Granada Hills South 94 Southwest Area 120 Northridge East West Area 86 Community and Neighbors for 61 South Robertson 62 Westside Ninth District Unity (CANNDU) 95 63 Westwood 64 Bel Air-Beverly Crest 87 Empowerment Congress 65 Brentwood 66 West Los Angeles Southeast Area 67 Mar Vista 68 Grass Roots Venice 88 Watts 96 70 Del Rey 71 Westchester/Playa del Rey 109 Vermont Harbor 115 Palms 117 Pacific Palisades 110 Central Alameda 07-11-06 Melvin Cañas  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 33. 1 3 2 Residential Districts 1. City West At-Large 4 2. Bunker Hill Alex Cha 3. Civic Center Resident 4. Historic Downtown Russell Brown 5. Central City East & Skid Row 5 6. South Park 6 Homeless 7. Fashion District Henry Proctor 8. Alameda East 7 Business Hal Bastian Area-Wide Directors 8 1. Mamta Patel 2. Russell Chan 3. Stanley B. Michaels 4. Patti Berman 5. General Jeff 6. Mary Wentz 7. Andrew Ruiz 8. Michael Francesconi Residential Districts Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council represents stakeholders The who live, work or own a business downtown. There are 28 members on the Board of Directors. Business Districts 1. David Hurtado 2. Jon Toktas 3. Michael Delijani 4. James Doizaki 1 5. Mike Pfeiffer 6. Brandon Coburn 2 Business Districts 7. Seth Polen 1. City West 2. Downtown Center 3. Historic Downtown 3 Area-Wide Directors 4. Central City East/Toy District Artist 5. South Park Dawna Nolan 6. Fashion District 4 7. Alameda East 5 Arts, Cultural & Educational Interests Danielle Duran Shane Guffogg 6 Brady Westwater Social Services Provider Wendell Blessingame 7 Antoinette Falice Shannon Parker SDAT Application Workforce-Private Sector Ashley Zarella Workforce-Public Sector Gunnar Hand  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 34. 2 1 4 3 Highways 1. Pasedena-Harbor Fwy (110) 2. Hollywood Fwy (101) 3. Santa Monica Fwy (10) Water 4. Los Angeles River Infrastructure - Roads Downtown Los Angeles is defined by the Los Angeles River on the east, US 101 on the north, the 10 Freeway on the south and, to include adjacent new residential towers, just west of Harbor Freeway. The Los Angeles River.  From blogdowntown.com photo pool click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 35. City streets are wide with few trees and little shade. Temperatures downtown are typically 12-15ºF higher than surrounding areas. Vacant and under-utilized storefronts make transitioning between new pockets of development downtown less pedestrian-friendly. Palm trees at Pershing Square (above) offer little more than decoration. The concrete park sits above a parking structure and is barely visible from the street. SDAT Application The city grid is intersected by several tunnels creates a disconnect for pedestrians for the convenience of the automobile.  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 36.  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 37. Downtown Los Angeles is home to the City of Los Angeles, state and federal government offices. City Hall is pictured on the left. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 38. Image by Johnson Fain Architects. Assets and Challenges Our neighborhood’s include a high concentration of cultural attractions which draws large crowds and few parks to service the community. Parks 1 2 3 4 Parks 1. Civic Center Park 2. Pershing Square  3. Grand Hope Park click here to return to 4. Gladys Park Appendix A table of contents
  • 39. 1. Civic Center Park There is a proposal by Johnson Fain Architects to redesign the Civic Center Park to make it more accessible to pedestrians and connected to the neighborhood. 2. Pershing Square 3. Grand Hope Park SDAT Application 4. Gladys Park One of the few public spaces for recreation downtown, Gladys Park is located in the heart of Skid Row and host to the 3-on-3 basketball league.  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 40. Nokia Theater L.A. Live (left) in South Park includes the Nokia Theater (above) and other facilities. The $2.5 billion dollar development is expected to produce a $10 billion economic impact, create more than 25,000 jobs, and produce more than $18 million in new annual tax revenues. The estimated $2.1 billion Grand Avenue project designed by Frank Gehry will include up to 3.6 Nokia Theater at L.A. Live million square feet of mixed-use development, the creation of a new park, streetscape improvements as well as outdoor public spaces throughout the development. It is estimated to create 29,000 construction-related jobs and 5,900 long-term jobs, and will generate more than $615 million in revenues annually along with an estimated $105 million annually in tax revenues. It was recently announced that the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group will manage the 275-room hotel that will occupy the first 20 floors of the 48-story tower. Colburn School (bottom left): This school for the performing arts recently underwent a 326,000- square foot, $120 million expansion. Walt Disney Concert Hall Grand Avenue Festival Colburn School Street Festival 0 click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 41. Outdoor art at ArtWalk activates the sidewalk in front of a parking lot Temporary installation parks on the streets of the Historic Core A space opens up for ArtWalk The Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council has actively supported programs such as ArtWalk to engage the community, encourage interaction and attract more people to stay beyond the end of their work day. Galleries around the neighborhood coordinate openings with ArtWalk and live music, wine, and crowds of people have become the standard for this amazing community event. Temporary installation parks on the streets of the Historic Core SDAT Application 1 click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 42. Points of interest 1. Music Center Ahmanson Theater Mark Taper Forum Dorothy Chandler Pavilion 1 2. Music Center 2 76 Walt Disney Concert Hall 8 Roy & Edna Disney/CalArts Theater 3 54 9 3. Colburn School of Performing Arts 4. Museum of Contemporary Art 13 14 5. Wells Fargo Historical Museum 10 14 11 6. Chinese American Museum 12 15 7. Japanese American National Museum 8. Los Angeles Children’s Museum 9. Museum of the Temporary Contemporary 10. LA Live 11. Staples Center 12. LA Convention Center 13. Bringing Back Broadway area (Historic Theaters) 14. ArtWalk 15. Southern California Institute for Architecture (SCI-Arc) Cultural Attractions/Assets Million Dollar Theater Tower Theater Inside the Staples Center Mark Taper Auditorium  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 43. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 44.  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 45. Bunker Hill The Sustainability Committee envisions a downtown that values its heritage and history while making changes for a healthier, more sustainable future for this and future generations. Aerial of Downtown in 1929 (above). SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 46. Click Here to Read and Search Footnotes 6 Click Here to Read and Search Footnotes 10 13 13 6 10 13 13 2,4 2,4 2,4 2,4 12 3 3 12 3 3 6 6 7 7 2,4 2,4 2,14 2,4 2,14 2,4 Click Footnote Section to Read and Search Footnotes Click Footnote Section to Read and Search Footnotes  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 47. Many downtown streets (left) are vacant at night raising concerns of public safety for the new residential population. Some evenings of the month, however, bring visitors to cultural attractions and community events such as ArtWalk. Until recently, there were few changes to the downtown skyline with the bulk of high-rise commercial development in the Bunker Hill and Financial District. Recent architectural additions, such as the CalTrans building by Morphosis, have drawn significant attention to downtown and its potential. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 48. Historic Core Map courtesy of USC School of Geography  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 49. “new” Downtown SDAT Application Map courtesy of USC School of Geography  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 50. Civic Center Map courtesy of USC School of Geography 0 click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 51. Fashion District SDAT Application Map courtesy of USC School of Geography 1 click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 52. Chinatown/Pueblo Map courtesy of USC School of Geography  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 53. South Park SDAT Application Map courtesy of USC School of Geography  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 54. W h o l e s a l e / S k i d Ro w Map courtesy of USC School of Geography  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 55. The population of Skid Row is difficult to track with new people coming and others leaving daily. With hard economic times, more people end up on the streets and in the transitional housing of Downtown Los Angeles. Each month community leaders walk together through the streets of Skid Row to familiarize themselves with the community, track progress and identify new areas for improvement. Commander Andrew Smith addresses the group in front of the Midnight Mission at 601 San Pedro Street. Images from blogdowntown.com photo pool SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 56. Angeles Plaza, adjacent to Angels Flight (the world’s shortest railroad) on Bunker Hill, is home for more than 1,300 senior citizens. Opened in 1980, the average of the residents here is of 82 years old. Public health and safety is a concern for the new residential population. Broadway (above) has the largest concentration of historic theaters in the country and has been the subject of many planning initiatives including the recent Bringing Back Broadway plan to widen sidewalks, reintroduce the streetcar, and revitalize the theaters.  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 57. Parking lots interrupt the streets and create unfriendly gaps in the urban fabric. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 58. A solar-powered trash compactor called a “big belly” was recently installed downtown as part of a pilot program. Access controlled to stem garbage hunting. The Sustainabilty Committee would like to better understand how this may help us manage waste downtown and identify where other big bellies (and recycling options) might work. New LAPD Headquarters is a LEED building with a public auditorium, restaurant, and large open plaza. There are several public transit options for local and regional trips. The DASH, operated by the City of Los Angeles costs $0.25/ride. There are plans to expand service to evenings to service the new residential population.  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 59. Rehabilitated buildings around the neighborhood are opening. Some efforts have been made by private development to enhance streetscapes in South Park, for instance. These improvements, however, should be enhance further to encourage pedestrian traffic and link other areas of the neighborhood. The City of Los Angeles Urban Design Studio recently developed urban design guidelines, a walkability checklist, and other planning tools which we must understand better as a community to increase their efficacy. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix A table of contents
  • 60. 0 click here to return to table of contents
  • 61. app endix b: planning City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, Cultural Master Plan City of Los Angeles Green Building Program City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Urban Design Studio Guidelines Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles, Cleantech Manufacturing Center Bringing Back Broadway Park 101 - Hollywood Freeway Cap Park (EDAW) City of Los Angeles Metro Transity Authority current projects Grand Avenue Project AB 1493: The Greenhouse Effect and California AB 32: Climate Change Draft Scoping Plan SDAT Application 1 click here to return to table of contents
  • 62.  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
  • 63. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
  • 64.  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
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  • 71. SDAT Application 1 click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
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  • 73. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
  • 74.  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
  • 75. http://urbandesignla.com/downtown_guidelines.htm Urban Design Principles Walkability Check List Downtown Design Guidelines 21st Century City Plan Studio Events About the Studio Contact DESIGN for a LIVABLE DOWNTOWN is an interdepartmental project among Department of City Planning, Community Redevelopment Agency, Department of Transportation and Public Works. Together with urban design, transportation and environmental consultants, the Urban Design Studio and City Team is advancing new context-sensitive street standards which emphasize walkability, sustainability and transit options; and simple but critical urban design standards to reinforce the community character of Downtown Los Angeles' many neighborhoods and Districts. The purpose of the Design Guidelines is to coordinate and orchestrate the overall development of the city core, so that projects help each other succeed and result in a better, livable downtown. The DRAFT Design Guidelines, quot;DESIGN for a LIVABLE DOWNTOWNquot;, are intended to provide guidance for creating a livable Downtown and will be used jointly by the Planning Department and Redevelopment Agency staff; and the Departments of Transportation and Public Works. Definitions Adoption of the Project will result in an amendment to the Central Appendix City Community Plan, implementation of its Urban Design Chapter, revision to the Los Angeles City's Street Standards requirements for Table of Contents Downtown, and clarifications of the Municipal Code. Adoption of the Project will result in the Community Redevelopment Agency using Download PDF Document the same standards as their quot;Design for Developmentquot; guidelines. Expected Public Review: Spring -Summer 2008 Citywide Planning Commission Hearing/Action: Summer 2008 Redevelopment Agency Hearing/Action: Summer 2008 These DRAFT standards are currently being tested in a quot;Pilot Programquot; as projects apply for entitlements in the Downtown area. You can review the DRAFT Design Guidelines, quot;DESIGN for a LIVABLE DOWNTOWNquot;, on-line or download either the entire document or by chapter. A DRAFT Copy of the Downtown Design Los Angeles Walkability Guidelines and Checklist http://urbandesignla.com/walkability.htm Guidelines has been made available for download in Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format. The Acrobat Reader plugin is available as a free download from http://www.adobe.com. 1 of 1 11/13/2008 12:06 AM Urban Design Principles Walkability Check List Downtown Design Guidelines 21st Century City Plan Studio Events About the Studio Contact WALKABILITY GUIDELINES AND CHECKLIST With leadership from the Urban Design Studio, in Summer 2007, the Citywide Planning Commission adopted the Walkability Checklist and directed that it be applied to all projects seeking discretionary approval, primarily Site Plan Review and Zone Change cases. Initially advanced by Councilmember Eric Garcetti, making our City more walkable is the natural outgrowth of a good climate, a desire to reduce carbon footprints, and create more opportunities within neighborhood districts for social contact and exchange. Walkability has a long history in the City, first considered prominently by former Councilmember Michael Woo who introduced the original Pedestrian Bill of Rights. The development of the initial Checklist required input by many stakeholders, lead by the City's Pedestrian Advisory Committee and including participation from SDAT Application several departments and agencies as well. On August 23, 2007, the Citywide Planning Commission approved the Walkability Checklist. The final graphically complete Walkability Checklist is under preparation, but for those who want to consult its many innovations and forward-thinking for current applications and projects, please see the following pages.  Download: Walkability Guidelines and Check List click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
  • 76.  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
  • 77. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
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  • 81. SDAT Application 1 click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
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  • 83. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
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  • 87. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
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  • 94. ‘Park 101′ vision downtown’s next big thing by Stephen Friday (June 29, 2008) 2 http://www.angelenic.com/780/park-101-vision- downtowns-next-big-thing/ 1 A grand proposal to cap Downtown’s half- 4 mile stretch of the 101 Freeway was publicly presented at the Caltrans Headquarters on Friday to a large audience of government officials, area stakeholders and curious residents. Dubbed simply ‘Park 101’, the vision was formulated by 24 summer interns of EDAW, one of the world’s leading design firms. The company’s 3 highly-acclaimed intern program, in its twenty- eighth year, brings together students from all over the world to address issues of regional or international significance -- in this case, a progressive urban planning concept adapted to the unique needs of inner city Los Angeles. Highways Through site visits, discussions with state and 1. Pasedena-Harbor Fwy (110) local officials, EDAW staff and other design 2. Hollywood Fwy (101) professionals participated with the students as a 3. Santa Monica Fwy (10) team to explore possible solutions to reconnect two Water halves of Downtown severed by the construction 4. Los Angeles River of the 101 Freeway.  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
  • 95. Not Just a “Cap” In explaining their design process, each of EDAW interns (some of which have never been to Los Angeles, or the United States) took turns during the presentation to touch on personal inspirations ranging from traditional European models to contemporary American examples such as Chicago’s Millennium Park and Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park. 101 Freeway Through Downtown Los AngelesConnectivity, pedestrian detail, land use optimization, sensitivity to context, and “wow factor” are all cited as driving forces behind the design. The final product is much more than a “cap” or a park - it’s an iconic embodiment of 21st-century Los Angeles; a statement of what this city, famous for its mis-guided affinity with the automobile, can become. In addition to creating a large amount green space atop the “Big Trench,” the Park 101 scope includes 1.9 million square-foot of mix-use development with 2,000 new residential units, office space, a grocery store and other retail, amphitheater, and a series of “grand gateway structures” anchoring the west end — one which is described as the 101 Freeway Through Downtown Los Angeles. Built in 1950, the eight-lane tallest skyscraper on the West Coast. highway (and its tentacles of on/off ramps) is responsible for fragmenting many original city streets and creating a pedestrian barrier between Park 101 is also intended to integrate with the Downtown’s landmark attractions throughout the historic centers of El LA River Revitalization Project, create a gateway Pueblo and Chinatown to the north and the districts of Bunker Hill and for Chinatown, and supplement Grand Avenue’s Civic Center to the south. “architecture row,” while diversifying land use in an area currently dominated by civic structures. The primary objective of the Park 101 project is to reclaim approximately 100 acres of land from Alameda to Grand (east and west) and Temple to It’s essentially a magic bullet for everything wrong Cesar Chavez (north and south), and relink the community both physically with this region of Downtown today — another and mentally by shifting the focus away from the automobile. “lump sum fix” becoming increasingly popular in the continued reinvention of Downtown, first seen in the 1950s with the ambitious Bunker Hill redevelopment project. Making it All Happen Planners and designers behind Park 101 propose a three-phase implementation, the first of which is estimated to cost approximately $700 million and would include the foundation infrastructure and major park component. All mixed-use buildings and signature towers (appearing white in the photos of the model above) would follow in later phases. The team of presenters argue that hundreds of millions of dollars produced by increased property values and taxes from the subsequent formation of “new real estate” could offset the costs of construction. Basically, the project would pay for itself, while generating over 5,000 long-term jobs. Sound to good to be true? It always is. Taking what we’ve learned from the Grand Avenue Project fiasco — can it be done within the next 10 SDAT Application years? park 101 Images provided by EDAW  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
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  • 97. SDAT Application  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
  • 98. 134 5 Colorado Bl Bl ock Bl m E agle R 134 Dr rha 2 Figu Ba eroa Y o rk Bl St 5 Hillhurst Av Colorado Bl Bl Laure Dr ck Bl 110 d lan Ca l ho Wilton Pl Eagle Ro m er l hu Dr ul rha li z B l Cy 2 h tc en Los Fe Av F ig u n Dr Ba Fle M ga eroa Sa Bl Y o rk nF Bl r io n St Hillhurst Av er Hollywood Bl rey na Hype L aBl Dr nd nte 110 u re nd Sunset Bl oR lla Ca ho Mo Wilton Pl r l hu ul e li z B l Cy d ch Dr en Av Lo s Fe n t Dr Fle M ga on e Bl Sa gt Bl Santa Monica Bl n nF H un ti ri o n G le nd al e Hollywood Bl l rn eB rey Hype an nte Bl do Sunset Bl lak 101 Mo Melrose Av Rd Dr er n Bl lv to ng Si Santa Monica Bl H un ti Gl en da le l eB Beverly Bl lak 101 Broadway Melrose Av er lv T h ir d Si St Beverly Bl St Rd in Broadway Ma Va ll e y on Bl T h ir d Wilshire Bl St i fn2 Stss Rd i i nM Olympic Bl Ma Va lle y Fir n Bl sio Wilshire Bl st 10i s fn2 San Pico Bl St M Vice Olympic Bl n Fir te B st San Se l 10 Pico Bl St Vice ve n te B nt Se l hS St ve t nt Av ena hS St l Bl B Venice Hoover St Vermont lAv Bl t Av Av ena La Cienega Bl Bl Bl Av rtson Lor Hoover St Vermont Av Venice aw B Western Av fax La Cienega Bl Av Western rt s o n Lor haw fax 4th rea nsh 4th Fair rea Ces F a ir St Robe ns Ces St Robe La B ar C La B Cre ar C Cre hav hav ez A ez A v v Six Six tee 60 nth tee fn2 60 nth St St fn2 Wh 5 itti er Alam eda St Wh Bl 5 i t Bl Olympict i e Ala med a St r Bl Santa Fe Av Soto St Olympic Bl Santa Fe Av Soto St Figure 3-1 Long Range Land Use Diagram Metro Figure 3-1 Long Range Land Use Diagram Close window to return to previous page Metro  Close click here to to return to previous page window return to Appendix B table of contents
  • 99. INTRODUCTION The General Plan Framework is a long range, citywide, comprehensive growth strategy. It is a special element of the general plan which looks to the future as required by law and replaces Concept Los Angeles and the Citywide Plan (adopted in 1974). Because it looks at the city as a whole, the Framework provides a citywide context within which local planning takes place. Both the benefits and challenges of growth are shared. The Framework sets forth a conceptual relationship between land use and transportation on a citywide basis and defines new land use categories which better describe the character and function of the city as it has evolved over time. The new categories - Neighborhood District, Community Center, Regional Center, Downtown Center and Mixed Use Boulevards - are broadly described (with ranges of intensity/density, heights and lists of typical uses) and generally shown on this long range land use diagram. The definitions reflect a range of land use possibilities found in the city's already diverse urban, suburban and rural land use patterns - patterns which have evolved over time at different rates and in different locations. Their generalized locations reflect a conceptual relationship between land use and transportation. Because it is citywide, the Framework cannot anticipate every detail. Therefore, the community plans must be looked to for final determinations as to boundaries, land use categories, intensities and heights that fall within the ranges described by the Framework. The Citywide General Plan Framework Element neither overrides nor supersedes the Community plans. It guides the city’s long range growth and development policy, establishing citywide standards, goals, policies and objectives for citywide elements and community plans. The Framework is flexible, suggesting a range of uses within its land use definitions. Precise determinations are made in the Community Plans. LEGEND Districts, Centers & Mixed Use Boulevards Neighborhood District Relationship To Community Plans A focal point for surrounding residential neighborhoods and containing a diversity Adoption of the Framework neither overrides nor mandates changes to the Community Plans. The Community Plans reflect appropriate levels of development at the time of the Framework’s adoption. of land uses such as restaurants, retail outlets, grocery stores, child care facilities, As community plans are updated utilizing future population forecasts and employment goals, the small professional offices, community meeting rooms, pharmacies, religious facilities Framework is to be used as a guide - its generalized recommendations to be more precisely determined and other similar services. The clustering of uses minimizes automobile trip-making for the individual needs and opportunities of each community plan area. During that process, nothing and encourages walking to and from adjacent neighborhoods. Pedestrian-oriented suggests that a community plan must be amended to the higher intensities or heights within the ranges described in the Framework. The final determination about what is appropriate locally will areas are encouraged, and the district may be served by a local shuttle service. be made through the community plans - and that determination may fall anywhere within the ranges Generally, Neighborhood Districts are at a floor area ratio of 1.5:1 or less and described. characterized by 1- or 2-story buildings. Dr As the city evolves over time, it is expected that areas not now recommended as Neighborhood n to Districts, Community and Regional Centers, and Mixed Use Boulevards may be in the future Community Center appropriately so designated; and areas now so designated may not be appropriate. Therefore, the Framework long range diagram may be amended to reflect the final determinations made through A focal point for surrounding residential neighborhoods and containing a diversity the Community Plan update process should those determinations be different from the adopted of uses such as small offices and overnight accommodations, cultural and entertainment Framework. facilities, schools and libraries, in addition to neighborhood oriented services. Examples of the application of Framework definitions: Community Centers range from floor area ratios of l.5:1 to 3.0:1. Generally, the height 1. A Regional Center located in a low- to mid-rise suburban area characterized by large vacant lots may have a lower intensity; while an urban area, where most lots are smaller and built upon at higher of different types of Community Centers will also range from 2- to 6-story buildings, intensities may have higher overall intensities. While the uses of these two types of Regional Centers e.g., some will be 2-story Centers, some 4- or 6-story Centers depending on the will generally be the same (e.g., large office buildings, major entertainment facilities, extensive retail, character of the surrounding area. Community Centers are served by small shuttles, including large shopping malls, overnight accommodations, served by major transportation and close local buses in addition to automobiles and/or may be located along rail transit stops. to housing), the development characteristics will differ and be determined through the Community Plan process, taking into account the surrounding area. 2. A Community Center in one part of the city may be identified for a low intensity, e.g., floor area Regional Center ratio of 1.5:1 and a height of 3 stories; while in another part of the City, a Communify Center may A focal point of regional commerce, identity and activity and containing a diversity start with a low intensity, e.g., floor area ratio of 1.5:1, but permit a bonus density (e.g., permit an of uses such as corporate and professional offices, residential, retail commercial additional floor area ratio of 0.5:1) and higher building heights whenever new development also malls, government buildings, major health facilities, major entertainment and cultural includes housing. These kinds of more precise determinations are made through the Community Plans. The General facilities and supporting services. Generally, different types of Regional Centers will Plan Framework provides the range within which the determinations are made. fall within the range of floor area ratios from 1.5:1 to 6.0:1. Some will only be commercially oriented; others will contain a mix of residential and commercial uses. Generally, Regional Centers are characterized by 6- to 20-stories (or higher). Regional Centers are usually major transportation hubs. Relationship To Specific Plans The city has a number of adopted specific plans which set detailed development regulations for local areas and include various types of regulatory limitations. Examples of these limitations include quot;trip Downtown Center caps,quot; Design Review Boards, density/intensity limits, maximum heights, landscape, lot coverage, An international center for finance and trade that serves the population of the five etc. The General Plan Framework is consistent with and does not supersede nor override these local county metropolitan region. Downtown is the largest government center in the region requirements. and the location for major cultural and entertainment facilities, hotels, professional offices, corporate headquarters, financial institutions, high-rise residential towers, regional transportation facilities and the Convention Center, The Downtown Center Footnotes is generally characterized by a floor area ratio up to 13:1 and high rise buildings. 1. The General Plan Framework is comprised of the generalized Long Range Land Use Diagram, policies and programs. For a comprehensive understanding of the Framework's recommendations, both maps and text should be consulted. Mixed Use Boulevard 2. Special Study Area. Future changes in use require approval by appropriate decision makers through These connect the city’s neighborhood districts and community, regional and Downtown appropriate studies and procedures. Changes may result in a community plan amendment, specific centers. Mixed Use development is encouraged along these boulevards, with the plan, development agreement, change of zone; and may include further restrictions, if necessary. scale, density and height of development compatible with the surrounding areas. 3. As decisions are made to fund or withdraw funding from transit stations, adjacent land uses will Generally, different types of Mixed Use Boulevards will fall within a range of floor be re-evaluated. area ratios from 1.5:1 up to 4.0:1 and be generally characterized by 1- to 2-story 4. Compact areas identified for future growth are known as Districts, Centers and Mixed Use Boulevards. They are also defined by their function within the community, citywide and regional commercial structures, up to 3- to 6-story mixed use buildings between centers and context and take into consideration adjacent property in adjoining cities when appropriate. They offer higher buildings within centers. Mixed Use Boulevards are served by a variety of a range of development potential because some are developed to their maximum, while others transportation facilities. are not. 0 3 5 KILOMETERS 1 4 2 1 1/2 0 1/2 1/4 1 4 MILES 1 3 2 N SDAT Application CITY OF LOS ANGELES GENERAL PLAN FRAMEWORK 2-19-03  click here to return to Appendix B table of contents
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  • 108. Western states are building strong regional program. Seven American states and three Canadian provinces make up the Western Climate Initiative. The WCI is an historic effort to collaborate climate action policies of the western United States, Canada and Mexico. (Source: Air Resources Board) State government will lead by example. As an employer of more than 350,000 Californians, state government is uniquely situated to adopt and implement policies that give worker the ability to decrease their individual carbon impact, including encouraging transit use, telecommuting and use of alternative work schedules. Projected 2020 Emissions, under a Business-as-Usual Approach: 596 MMT 1990 Emissions Inventory Baseline 427 MMT Total Reductions Needed to meet AB32 requirements: 169 MMT Timeline: By Jan 1, 2009 ARB adopts plan indicating how emission reductions will be achieved from significant sources of GHGs via regulations, market mechanisms and other actions. During 2009 ARB staff drafts rule language to implement its plan and holds a series of public workshop on each measure (including market mechanisms). By Jan 1, 2010 Early action measures take effect. During 2010 ARB conducts series of rulemakings, after workshops and public hearings, to adopt GHG regulations including rules governing market mechanisms. By Jan 1, 2011 ARB completes major rulemakings for reducing GHGs including market mechanisms. ARB may revise the rules and adopt new ones after 1/1/2011 in furtherance of the 2020 cap. By Jan 1, 2012 GHG rules and market mechanisms adopted by ARB take effect and are legally enforceable. Dec 31, 2020 Deadline for achieving 2020 GHG emissions cap. Downtown Los AnGeles Center for Communities by Design 2009 Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) Program Proposal community-driven change If you have any questions or require clarification, please do not hesitate to contact Ashley Zarella, LEED AP, Assoc. AIA at ashley.zarella@dlanc.com or 917-974-1891. Thank you for taking time to review this proposal and supporting documentation. We look forward to hearing from you. 10 click here to return to click here to return to Appendix B table of contents table of contents