Ldc Logo

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Choosing LDC Logo

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  • In 1940 a bet of $50,000 was placed with Raymond Loewy that he could not increase sales of the Lucky Strike cigarettes by simply redesigning the logo and packaging. Confident in his abilities he began re-design, his goal when designing was to make a logo that if seen just once would be imprinted in your memory, this was done using simplicity. The first change on Lucky Strike was to change the background to white, and place the logo on both sides of the packaging, this would reduce printing costs as well as increase brand exposure. He changed the text around the package to smaller sizes to not distract from the new logo design and to provide a clean white background. Needless to say he was awarded the $50,000 and increased Lucky Strikes profitability, not to mention created a design that is difficult to forget.Do these design changes sounds familiar? White background… Google. Remove text on packaging to not distract… Apple. Designers today are still using the same design tricks Raymond Loewy was using over 70 years ago to increase profitability. Have we come full circle to simplicity, or did simplicity ever leave?
  • Famous logos have these two things in common– distinctiveness and simplicity. The more complex a logo is, however, the less likely it will be that people will remember it.
  • two very important principles of logo design are a) using only 2-3 colors for a logo, and b) not mixing 2 or more different fonts together in the same design. Using more than 3 colors for a logo can make the logo difficult to memorize. Additionally, using 2 or more fonts can cause confusion.
  • Ldc Logo

    1. 1. LDCLogo<br />IDENTITY<br />
    2. 2. Raymond Loewy<br />
    3. 3. The Man Who Designed America<br />
    4. 4. SHELL n’ BP<br />
    5. 5. and of course RITZ<br />
    6. 6. "I'm no fan of cigarette marketing, but Loewy's vision for Lucky Strike (1940) might be the greatest packaging design ever”.<br />Mark Frauenfelde<br />Writer, illustrator, and co-founder of the Web's best blog, BoingBoing. <br />
    7. 7.
    8. 8. In 1940 a bet of $50,000 was placed with Raymond Loewy that he could not increase sales of the Lucky Strike cigarettes by simply redesigning the logo and packaging. <br />Confident in his abilities he began re-design, his goal when designing was to make a logo that if seen just once would be imprinted in your memory, this was done using simplicity. <br />The first change on Lucky Strike was to change the background to white, and place the logo on both sides of the packaging, this would reduce printing costs as well as increase brand exposure. He changed the text around the package to smaller sizes to not distract from the new logo design and to provide a clean white background. <br />Needless to say he was awarded the $50,000 and increased Lucky Strikes profitability, not to mention created a design that is difficult to forget.<br />
    9. 9. Logo is Important<br />
    10. 10. It’s about identity<br />
    11. 11. It’s about branding<br />
    12. 12. Famous logos have these two things in common: distinctiveness and simplicity<br />
    13. 13. Important principles<br />using only 2-3 colours <br />not mixing 2 or more different fonts<br />
    14. 14.
    15. 15. Reasons for Change<br />
    16. 16. Reason 1<br />Lots of team change<br />
    17. 17. Reason 2<br />New VC New Year<br />
    18. 18. Reason 3<br />The current logo<br />
    19. 19.
    20. 20. Time to Change<br />
    21. 21. 3 New Designs<br />
    22. 22. Design one<br />
    23. 23.
    24. 24. Design two<br />
    25. 25.
    26. 26. Design three<br />
    27. 27.
    28. 28. Design four<br />
    29. 29.
    30. 30. Which?<br />We decide<br />

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